Evaluation metrics for biostatistical and epidemiological collaborations

Authors

  • Doris McGartland Rubio,

    Corresponding author
    1. Data Center, Center for Research on Health Care, Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 200 Meyran Avenue, Suite 200, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, U.S.A.
    • Data Center, Center for Research on Health Care, Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 200 Meyran Avenue, Suite 200, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, U.S.A.
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  • Deborah J. del Junco,

    1. Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design Core, Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, U.S.A.
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  • Rafia Bhore,

    1. Division of Biostatistics, Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, U.S.A.
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  • Christopher J. Lindsell,

    1. Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training and Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, U.S.A.
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  • Robert A. Oster,

    1. Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, and Design and Biostatistics Program, Center for Clinical and Translational Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, U.S.A.
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  • Knut M. Wittkowski,

    1. Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design Core, Center for Clinical and Translational Science, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, U.S.A.
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  • Leah J. Welty,

    1. Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
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  • Yi-Ju Li,

    1. Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Translational Medicine Institute, Center for Human Genetics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, U.S.A.
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  • Dave DeMets,

    1. Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
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  • the Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design (BERD) Key Function Committee of the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Consortium

Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Correction: Evaluation metrics for biostatistical and epidemiological collaborations Volume 31, Issue 6, 600, Article first published online: 11 January 2012

Abstract

Increasing demands for evidence-based medicine and for the translation of biomedical research into individual and public health benefit have been accompanied by the proliferation of special units that offer expertise in biostatistics, epidemiology, and research design (BERD) within academic health centers. Objective metrics that can be used to evaluate, track, and improve the performance of these BERD units are critical to their successful establishment and sustainable future. To develop a set of reliable but versatile metrics that can be adapted easily to different environments and evolving needs, we consulted with members of BERD units from the consortium of academic health centers funded by the Clinical and Translational Science Award Program of the National Institutes of Health. Through a systematic process of consensus building and document drafting, we formulated metrics that covered the three identified domains of BERD practices: the development and maintenance of collaborations with clinical and translational science investigators, the application of BERD-related methods to clinical and translational research, and the discovery of novel BERD-related methodologies. In this article, we describe the set of metrics and advocate their use for evaluating BERD practices. The routine application, comparison of findings across diverse BERD units, and ongoing refinement of the metrics will identify trends, facilitate meaningful changes, and ultimately enhance the contribution of BERD activities to biomedical research. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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