A model of work-related well-being for educators in South Africa

Authors

  • Leon T. B. Jackson,

    1. WorkWell: Research Unit for People, Policy and Performance, North-West University, South Africa
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  • Sebastiaan Rothmann,

    Corresponding author
    1. WorkWell: Research Unit for People, Policy and Performance, North-West University, South Africa
    • WorkWell: Research Unit for People, Policy and Performance, North-West University, Potchefstroom, 2520, South Africa
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  • Fons J. R. van de Vijver

    1. Department of Psychology, Tilburg University, the Netherlands, and WorkWell: Research Unit for People, Policy and Performance North-West University, South Africa
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Abstract

The aims of this study were to assess the validity and internal consistency of constructs in a model of work-related well-being and to test a structural model of their relationships. The Maslach Burnout Inventory—General Survey, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, a Job Demands-Resources Scale, a Health Questionnaire, and an Organizational Commitment Scale were administered to a stratified random sample of 1177 educators in North-west Province (South Africa). A good fit was found for a model in which burnout (exhaustion and mental distance) mediated the relationship between job demands and ill-health, while work engagement (vigor and dedication) mediated the relationship between job resources and organizational commitment. Job resources contributed strongly to low burnout and high work engagement. These results suggest that both positive and negative aspects of work-related well-being (i.e. burnout and work engagement) can be integrated into one model. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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