SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Alchian, A. A. and H. Demsetz (1972). ‘Production, information costs, and economic organization’, American Economic Review, 62, pp. 777795.
  • Anderson, B. L. and A. J. H. Latham (eds.) (1986). The Market in History. Croom Helm, London.
  • Argyris, C. and D. A. Schon (1978). Organizational Learning: A Theory of Action Perspective. Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA.
  • Arrow, K. (1962). ‘The economic implications of learning by doing’, Review of Economic Studies, 29, pp. 155173.
  • Baden-Fuller, C. and M. Pitt (1996). ‘The nature of innovating strategic management’. In C. Baden-Fuller and M. Pitt (eds.), Strategic Innovation. Routledge, London, pp. 342.
  • Barnard, C. I. (1938). The Functions of the Executive. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Barnett, W. P. and R. A. Burgelman (1996). ‘Evolutionary perspectives on strategy’, Strategic Management Journal, Summer Special Issue, 17, pp. 519.
  • Barney, J. B. (1986). ‘Strategic factor markets: Expectations, luck and business strategy’, Management Science, 32, pp. 12311241.
  • Barney, J. B. (1991). ‘Firm resources and sustained competitive advantage’, Journal of Management, 17, pp. 99120.
  • Best, M. H. (1990). The New Competition: Institutions of Industrial Restructuring. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Bijker, W. E., T. P. Hughes and T. J. Pinch (eds.) (1987). The Social Constructions of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Buckley, W. (ed.) (1968). Modern Systems Research for the Behavioral Scientist. Aldine, Chicago, IL.
  • Callon, M. (1980). ‘The state and technical innovation: A case study of the electrical vehicle in France’, Research Policy, 9, pp. 358376.
  • Callon, M. (1987). ‘Society in the making: The study of technology as a tool for sociological analysis’. In W. E. Bijker, T. P. Hughes and T. Pinch (eds.), The Social Construction of Technological Systems. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 83103.
  • Chamberlin, E. H. (1933). The Theory of Monopolistic Competition. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Chi, M., R. Glaser and M. J. Farr (eds.) (1988). The Nature of Expertise. Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ.
  • Cohen, M. D. and L. S. Sproull (eds.) (1996). Organizational Learning. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA.
  • Conner, K. R. (1991). ‘A historical comparison of resource-based theory and five schools of thought within industrial organization economics: Do we have a new theory of the firm?’, Journal of Management, 17 (1), pp. 121154.
  • Czikszentmihalyi, M. (1988). ‘The flow experience and its significance for human psychology’. In M. Czikszentmihalyi and I. S. Czikszentmihalyi (eds.), Optimal Experience: Psychological Studies of Flow in Consciousness. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K., pp. 1535.
  • David, P. (1985). ‘Clio and the economics of QWERTY’, American Economic Review, 75 (2), pp. 332337.
  • DiMaggio, P. (1990). ‘Cultural aspects of economic action and organization’. In R. Friedland and A. F. Robertson (eds.), Beyond the Marketplace: Rethinking Economy and Society. Aldine de Gruyter, New York, pp. 113136.
  • Dosi, G. (1982). ‘Technological paradigms and technological trajectories’, Research Policy, 11, pp. 147162.
  • Durkheim, E. (1964). The Rules of Sociological Method. Free Press, New York.
  • Friedland, R. and A. F. Robertson (1990). ‘Beyond the marketplace’. In R. Friedland and A. F. Robertson (eds.), Beyond the Marketplace: Rethinking Economy and Society. Aldine de Gruyter, New York, pp. 349.
  • Fuller, S. (1988). Social Epistemology. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, IN.
  • Galenson, D. W. (ed.) (1989). Markets in History: Economic Studies of the Past. Cambridge University Press, New York.
  • Grant, R. M. (1995). Contemporary Strategy Analysis: Concepts, Techniques, Applications (2nd ed.). Blackwell, Cambridge, MA.
  • Grant, R. M. (1996). ‘A knowledge-based theory of inter-firm collaboration’, Organization Science, 7, pp. 375387.
  • Harper, D. A. (1987). Working Knowledge: Skill and Community in a Small Shop. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.
  • Hayek, F. A. (1945). ‘The use of knowledge in society’, American Economic Review, 35, pp. 519530.
  • Healy, J. F. and L. E. Bourne (1995). Learning and Memory of Knowledge and Skills: Durability and Specificity. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA.
  • Hedlund, G. and I. Nonaka (1993). ‘Models of knowledge management in the West and Japan’. In P. Lorange, B. Chakravarty, J. Roos and A. Van de Ven (eds.), Implementing Strategic Processes: Change, Learning and Cooperation. Basil Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 117144.
  • Hirschhorn, L. (1984), Beyond Mechanization: Work and Technology in a Postindustrial Age. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Huber, G. (1991). ‘Organizational learning: The contributing processes and the literatures’, Organization Science, 2, pp. 88115.
  • Hughes, T. P. (1983). Networks of Power: Electrification in Western Society, 1880–1930. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD.
  • Hughes, T. P. (1992). ‘The dynamics of technological change: Salients, critical problems and industrial revolutions’. In G. Dosi, R. Gianetti and P. A. Toninelli (eds.), Technology and Enterprise in a Historical Perspective. Clarendon Press, Oxford, pp. 97118.
  • Ihde, D. (1993). Philosophy of Technology: An Introduction. Paragon House, New York.
  • James, W. (1950). The Principles of Psychology, Vols. I and II. Dover Publications, New York.
  • Knight, F. H. (1921). Risk, Uncertainty and Profit. Houghton Mifflin, Boston, MA.
  • Kogut, B. and U. Zander (1992). ‘Knowledge of the firm, combinative capabilities, and the replication of technology’, Organization Science, 3, pp. 383397.
  • Kuhn, T. S. (1970). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (2nd ed.). University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.
  • Kusterer, K. C. (1978). Know-how on the Job: The Important Working Knowledge of the ‘Unskilled’ Workers. Westview Press, Boulder, CO.
  • Landes, D. S. (1983). Revolution in Time: Clocks and the Making of the Modern World. Belknap Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Latour, B. (1987). Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers through Society. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Latour, B. (1993). We Have Never Been Modern. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Latour, B. (1996). Aramis or the Love of Technology. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Law, J. and M. Callon (1992). ‘The life and death of an aircraft: A network analysis of technical change’. In W. E. Bijker and J. Law (eds.), Shaping Technology/Building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 2152.
  • Learned, E., R. Christensen, K. Andrews and W. Guth (1965). Business Policy: Text and Cases. Irwin, Homewood, IL.
  • Leonard-Barton, D. (1995). Wellsprings of Knowledge: Building and Sustaining the Sources of Innovation. Harvard Business School Press, Boston, MA.
  • Machlup, F. (1980). Knowledge: Its Creation, Distribution, and Economic Significance, Vol. 1. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.
  • McCloskey, D. N. (1989). ‘The open fields of England: Rent risk and the rate of interest, 1300–1815’. In D. W. Galenson (ed.), Markets in History. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 551.
  • Moingeon, B. and A. Edmondson (eds.) (1996). Organizational Learning and Competitive Advantage. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA.
  • Nelson, R. R. (1992). ‘Economic growth via the coevolution of technology and institutions’. In L. Leydesdorff and P. Bessalaar (eds.), Evolutionary Economics and Chaos Theory: New Directions in Technology Studies. St. Martin's Press, New York.
  • Nelson, R. R. (19 March 1996). Personal communication.
  • Nelson, R. R. and S. G. Winter (1982). An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change. Belknap Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Nohria, N. and G. Eccles (1992). Networks and Organizations: Structure, Form and Action. Harvard Business School Press, Boston, MA.
  • Nonaka, I. and H. Takeuchi (1995). The Knowledge-creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation. Oxford University Press, New York.
  • Orton, J. D. and K. E. Weick (1990). ‘Loosely coupled systems: A reconceptualization’, Academy of Management Review, 15, pp. 203223.
  • Penrose, E. T. (1952). ‘Biological analogies in the theory of the firm—I’, American Economic Review, 42, pp. 804819.
  • Penrose, E. T. (1953). ‘Biological analogies in the theory of the firm—II’, American Economic Review, 43, pp. 603619.
  • Penrose, E. T. (1959). The Theory of the Growth of the Firm. Wiley, New York.
  • Pickering, A. (ed.) (1992). Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.
  • Pinch, T. J. and W. E. Bijker (1987). ‘The social construction of facts and artifacts’. In W. E. Bijker, T. P. Hughes and T. J. Pinch (eds.), The Social Construction of Technological Systems. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 1750.
  • Plotkin, H. (1994). Darwin Machines and the Nature of Knowledge. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Polanyi, M. (1962). Personal Knowledge: Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy (corrected ed.). University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.
  • Polanyi, M. (1967). The Tacit Dimension. Anchor Books, Garden City, NY.
  • Popper, K. R. (1969). Conjectures and Refutation: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge (3rd edn.). Routledge & Kegan Paul, London.
  • Porter, M. E. (1979). ‘How competitive forces shape strategy’, Harvard Business Review, 57 (2), pp. 137145.
  • Porter, M. E. (1980). Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors. Free Press, New York.
  • Porter, M. E. (1991). ‘Towards a dynamic theory of strategy’, Strategic Management Journal, Winter Special Issue, 12, pp. 95117.
  • Purser, R. E. and A. Montuori (1995). ‘Varieties of knowledge work experience: A critical systems inquiry into the epistemologies and mindscapes of knowledge production’, Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams, 2, pp. 117161.
  • Reber, A. S. (1993). Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge: An Essay on the Cognitive Unconscious. Oxford University Press, New York.
  • Rumelt, R. P. (1987). ‘Theory, strategy, and entrepreneurship’. In D. Teece (ed.), The Competitive Challenge. Ballinger, Cambridge, MA, pp. 137158.
  • Samuelson, P. A. (1955). ‘Diagrammatic exposition of a theory of public expenditure’, Review of Economics and Statistics, 37, pp. 350356.
  • Sandelands, L. E. and R. E. Stablein (1987). ‘The concept of organization mind’, Research in the Sociology of Organizations, 5, pp. 135161.
  • Schank, R. and R. Abelson (1977). Scripts, Plans, Goals and Understanding. Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ.
  • Schendel, D. (1996). ‘Editor's introduction to the 1996 summer special issue: Evolutionary perspectives on strategy’, Strategic Management Journal, Summer special issue, 17, pp. 14.
  • Scherer, A. G. and M. J. Dowling (1995). ‘Towards a reconciliation of the theory-pluralism in strategic management’. In P. Shrivastava and C. Stubbart (eds.), Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 12A. JAI Press, Greenwich, CT, pp. 195247.
  • Selznick, P. (1957). Leadership in Administration: A Sociological Interpretation. Harper & Row, New York.
  • Simon, H. A. (1947). Administrative Behavior. Macmillan, New York.
  • Simon, H. A. (1973). ‘The organization of complex systems’. In H. Pattee (ed.), Hierarchy Theory: The Challenge of Complex Systems. George Braziller, New York, pp. 327.
  • Singley, M. K. and J. R. Anderson (1989). The Transfer of Cognitive Skill. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1989). Industry Recipes: The Nature and Sources of Managerial Judgement. Basil Blackwell, Oxford.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1992). ‘Strategy theorizing: Expanding the agenda’. In P. Shrivastava, A. Huff and J. Dutton (eds.), Advances in Strategic Management, 12A. JAI Press, Greenwich, CT, pp. 332.
  • Spender, J-C. (1993). ‘Competitive advantage from tacit knowledge? Unpacking the concept and its strategic implications’, Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings, pp. 3741.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1994a). ‘Knowing, managing and learning: A dynamic managerial epistemology’, Management Learning, 25, pp. 387412.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1994b). ‘Workplace knowledge as a competitive advantage: Management education's missed targets’. In J. B. Barney, J.-C. Spender and T. Reve, Does Management Matter? On Competencies and Competitive Advantage. Lund Institute of Economic Research, Lund, pp. 3768.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1994c). ‘Organizational knowledge, collective practice and Penrose rents’, International Business Review, 3, pp. 353367.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1995). ‘Organizations are activity systems, not merely systems of thought’. In P. Shrivastava and C. Stubbart (eds.), Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 11. JAI Press, Greenwich, CT, pp. 151172.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1996a). ‘Organizational knowledge, learning and memory: Three concepts in search of a theory’, Journal of Organizational Change Management, 9, pp. 6379.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1996b). ‘Competitive advantage from tacit knowledge? Unpacking the concept and its strategic implciations’. In B. Moingeon and A. Edmondson (eds.), Organizational Learning and Competitive Advantage. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp. 5673.
  • Spender, J.-C. (1996c). ‘Villain, victim or visionary? The insights and flaws in F. W. Taylor's ideas’. In J.-C. Spender and H. Kijne (eds.), Scientific Management: Frederick Wins low Taylor's Gift to the World. Kluwer, Norwell, MA, pp. 131.
  • Spender, J.-C. (forthcoming). ‘Workplace cognition: The individual and collective dimensions’. In J.-C. Spender and C. Eden (eds.), Managerial and Organizational Cognition. Sage, London.
  • Spender, J.-C. and P. H. Grinyer (1996). ‘Organizational renewal: Deinstitutionalization and loosely-coupled systems’, International Studies of Management and Organization, 26, pp. 1740.
  • Stacey, R. (1995). ‘The science of complexity: An alternative perspective for strategic change processes’, Strategic Management Journal, 16 (6), pp. 477495.
  • Sternberg, R. J. and R. K. Wagner (eds.) (1986). Practical Intelligence: Nature and Origins of Competence in the Everyday World. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K.
  • Teece, D. J. (1987). ‘Profiting from technological innovation’. In D. J. Teece (ed.), The Competitive Challenge. Ballinger, Cambridge, MA, pp. 185219.
  • Tharp, R. G. and R. Gallimore (1988). Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning, and Schooling in Social Context. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K.
  • Thompson, J. D. (1967). Organizations in Action: Social Science Bases of Administrative Theory. McGraw-Hill, New York.
  • Trist, E. and H. Murray (eds.) (1993). The Social Engagement of Social Science, Vol. II: The Sociotechnical Perspective. University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, PA.
  • von Hippel, E. (1988). The Sources of Innovation. Oxford University Press, New York.
  • von Hippel, E. (1994). ‘Sticky information and the locus of problem solving: Implications for innovation’, Management Science, 40, pp. 429439.
  • Weber, M. (1968). On Charisma and Institution Building. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.
  • Weick, K. E. and K. H. Roberts (1993). ‘Collective mind in organizations: Heedful interrelating on flight decks’, Administrative Science Quarterly, 38, pp. 357381.
  • Wernerfelt, B. (1984). ‘A resource-based view of the firm’, Strategic Management Journal, 5 (2), pp. 171180.
  • Wheatley, M. J. (1994). Leadership and the New Science: Learning about Organization from an Orderly Universe. Berrett-Koehler, San Francisco, CA.
  • Williamson, O. E. (1990). ‘The firm as a nexus of treaties: An introduction’. In M. Aoki, B. Gustafsson and O. E. Williamson (eds.), The Firm as a Nexus of Treaties. Sage, Newbury Park, CA, pp. 125.