Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as a Delivery System for Hydrophobic Anticancer Drugs

Authors

  • Jie Lu Dr.,

    1. Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, California NanoSystems Institute, JCCC, University of California, Los Angeles, 609 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-206-5231
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  • Monty Liong,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, 605 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-206-4038
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  • Jeffrey I. Zink Prof.,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, 605 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-206-4038
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  • Fuyuhiko Tamanoi Prof.

    1. Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, California NanoSystems Institute, JCCC, University of California, Los Angeles, 609 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, Fax: (+1) 310-206-5231
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  • J.L. and M.L. contributed equally to this work. We thank Thoi D. Nguyen for helpful experiments and discussions. This work is supported by the US National Institutes of Health (grant no. CA32737), the National Science Foundation (grant no. DMR 0346601), and the University of California (UC) Lead Campus for Nanotoxicology Training and Research, funded by the UC TSR&TP.

Abstract

original image

Special delivery: The hydrophobic anticancer drug camptothecin was incorporated into fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (see image) and delivered to various cancer cells to induce cell death. These results suggest a method to overcome the insolubility problem of many anticancer drugs, which is considered to be one of the major challenges in cancer therapy.

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