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Two-Dimensional Single-Crystal Nanowire Arrays

Authors

  • Dunwei Wang Dr.,

    1. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, MC 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-395-2355
    2. Department of Chemistry, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Yuri Bunimovich,

    1. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, MC 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-395-2355
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Akram Boukai,

    1. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, MC 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-395-2355
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • James R. Heath Prof.

    1. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, MC 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-395-2355
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  • The authors thank DARPA MolApps program, the NSF (CCF-0541461) and the MARCO Center for Advanced Materials and Devices for financial support. We are also grateful to Prof. Andrew DeHon and Prof. Alain Martin for insightful discussion.

Abstract

original image

Two dimensions are better than one: 1D arrays of nanowires, produced using the superlattice nanowire pattern transfer (SNAP) technique, are extended into two dimensions to produce 2D single-crystal nanowire structures. The method is demonstrated as a general approach towards achieving ohmic contacts to p- and n-type silicon nanowires, regardless of their doping level. Photonic-like crystals and suspended structures (see figure) are also demonstrated.

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