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Titania Nanotubes: A Novel Platform for Drug-Eluting Coatings for Medical Implants?

Authors

  • Ketul C. Popat Prof.,

    1. Department of Physiology/Division of Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco CA 94143, USA, Fax: (+1) 415-476-2414
    2. Department of Mechanical Engineering/School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523, USA
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  • Matthew Eltgroth,

    1. School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco CA 94143, USA
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  • Thomas J. LaTempa,

    1. Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, State College PA 16802, USA
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  • Craig A. Grimes Prof.,

    1. Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, State College PA 16802, USA
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  • Tejal A. Desai Prof.

    1. Department of Physiology/Division of Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco CA 94143, USA, Fax: (+1) 415-476-2414
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  • The authors are grateful for a UCSF REAC award, the Sandler Family Supporting Foundation, and NSFCCTS-0518269 for funding this project. K.C.P. and M.E. contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

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Nanotubes for drug release: Titania nanotubes (see image) fabricated by an easy anodization process can be used as drug-eluting coatings for implantable devices. The release rate of the drugs is controlled by varying the amount of proteins loaded into the nanotubes. Moreover, by changing the nanotube diameter, wall thickness, and length, the release kinetics can be altered for each specific drug to achieve a sustained release.

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