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Heteroepitaxial Growth of Nanoscale Oxide Shell/Fiber Superstructures by Mild Hydrothermal Processes

Authors

  • Chun-Hu Chen,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
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  • Lei Jin,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
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  • Anais E. Espinal,

    1. Institute of Materials Science University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (USA)
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  • Brian T. Firliet,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
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  • Linping Xu,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
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  • Mark Aindow,

    1. Department of Chemical, Materials & Biomolecular Engineering University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (USA)
    2. Institute of Materials Science University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (USA)
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  • Raymond Joesten,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
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  • Steven L. Suib

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
    2. Institute of Materials Science University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA).
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  • We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences for support of this research. We thank the Center for Environmental Sciences and Engineering of the University of Connecticut for support and assistance in executing the research. We also thank Dr. Frank Galasso, Dr. Xiongfei Shen, and Mr. Shih-Po Sun for helpful discussions and suggestions.

Abstract

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A general method utilizing heteroepitaxy of various rutile-phase materials such as TiO2 and SnO2 is developed that allows control of pure phases, nanometer-sized particulates, production of oriented hollow rods, and controlled thickness of phases normally produced at elevated temperatures.

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