Peptide-Nanotube Biochips for Label-Free Detection of Multiple Pathogens

Authors

  • Roberto de la Rica,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Hunter College, City University of New York 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Hunter College, City University of New York 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA).
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  • Christophe Pejoux,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Hunter College, City University of New York 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA)
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  • Cesar Fernandez-Sanchez,

    1. Department of Micro- and Nanosystems Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)
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  • Antonio Baldi,

    1. Department of Micro- and Nanosystems Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)
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  • Hiroshi Matsui

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Hunter College, City University of New York 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Hunter College, City University of New York 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (USA).
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  • This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (sensor fabrication, biological materials) under Award No. ECCS-082390 and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (AC impedance analysis) under Award No. DE-FG-02-01ER45935. Hunter College infrastructure is supported by the National Institutes of Health, the RCMI program (G12-RR003037-245476). R.R. acknowledges a postdoctoral fellowship from the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación and Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología.

Abstract

original image

Peptide nanotubes are integrated with microfabricated transducer arrays for bacterial detection. On each microelectrode of the array, circulating antibody-modified peptide nanotubes agglutinate bacteria as pathogen catchers and generate an impedance signal on the transducer. The pathogen microarray can detect as few as 102 cells of E. coli or S. typhi within one hour and the sensor chip can be easily reused for multiple measurements.

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