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Nanofibrous Bio-inorganic Hybrid Structures Formed Through Self-Assembly and Oriented Mineralization of Genetically Engineered Phage Nanofibers

Authors

  • Tao He,

    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA, Tel: 405–325-4385, Fax: 405–325-6111
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  • Gopal Abbineni,

    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA, Tel: 405–325-4385, Fax: 405–325-6111
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  • Binrui Cao,

    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA, Tel: 405–325-4385, Fax: 405–325-6111
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  • Chuanbin Mao

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA, Tel: 405–325-4385, Fax: 405–325-6111
    • Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry University of Oklahoma Norman, OK 73019, USA Tel: 405–325-4385, Fax: 405–325-6111.

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Abstract

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Filamentous M13 phage is genetically engineered to become anionic by fusing a negatively charged peptide to its major coat protein (pVIII). The cationic precursors of hydroxylapatite (HAP) such as Ca2+ ions induce the self-assembly of the negatively charged phage into a nanofibrous structure in the presence of anionic precursors such as PO43− ions. The cationic and anionic precursors are accumulated within the nanofibrous structure, leading to the formation of oriented nanocrystalline HAP.

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