Porous Graphene as an Atmospheric Nanofilter

Authors

  • Stephan Blankenburg,

    Corresponding author
    1. nanotech@surface Laboratory, EMPA – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8060 Duebendorf, Switzerland
    2. Universität Paderborn, Pohlweg 55, 33095 Paderborn, Germany
    • nanotech@surface Laboratory, EMPA – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8060 Duebendorf, Switzerland.
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  • Marco Bieri,

    1. nanotech@surface Laboratory, EMPA – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8060 Duebendorf, Switzerland
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  • Roman Fasel,

    1. nanotech@surface Laboratory, EMPA – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8060 Duebendorf, Switzerland
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  • Klaus Müllen,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55124 Mainz, Germany
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  • Carlo A. Pignedoli,

    1. nanotech@surface Laboratory, EMPA – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8060 Duebendorf, Switzerland
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  • Daniele Passerone

    1. nanotech@surface Laboratory, EMPA – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8060 Duebendorf, Switzerland
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Abstract

The fabrication of nanoscale membranes exhibiting high selectivity is an emerging field of research. The possibility to use bottom-up approaches to fabricate a filter with porous graphene and analyze its functionality with first principle calculations is investigated. Here, the porous network is produced by self-assembly of the hexaiodo-substituted macrocycle cyclohexa-m-phenylene (CHP). The resulting porous network exhibits an extremely high selectivity in favor of H2 and He among other atmospheric gases, such as Ne, O2, N2, CO, CO2, NH3, and Ar. The presented membrane is superior to traditional filters using polymers or silica and could have great potential for further technological applications such as gas sensors or fuel cells.

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