Enabling Cargo-Carrying Bacteria via Surface Attachment and Triggered Release

Authors

  • Rohan Fernandes,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Mary Zuniga,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Fritz R. Sassine,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Mert Karakoy,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • David H. Gracias

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
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Abstract

original image

Motile bacteria are selectively attached to submicrometer-scale cargo immobilized on gold patterns on a silicon substrate using surface chemistry and the specificity of antibody-based capture. The bacteria–cargo conjugates can be released on-demand from the surface with benign chemicals, and the motile bacteria are observed to propel their cargo in solution.

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