Heteroepitaxy: Small 9/2010

Authors

  • Chun-Hu Chen,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lei Jin,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Anais E. Espinal,

    1. Institute of Materials Science University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Brian T. Firliet,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Linping Xu,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mark Aindow,

    1. Department of Chemical, Materials & Biomolecular Engineering University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (USA)
    2. Institute of Materials Science University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Raymond Joesten,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Steven L. Suib

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA)
    2. Institute of Materials Science University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269–3060 (USA).
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

original image

The cover picture shows electron microscopy images of the produced nanoscale shell/fiber superstructure TiO2 on cryptomelane MnO2 (OMS-2) in a single-step aqueous reaction. Control of the nanostructure and orientation of materials is important but complicated in current nanotechnological applications. The discovery of size, shape, and array controls of TiO2 nanomaterials via heteroepitaxy offers a much simpler way to produce complex nanomaterials. The mechanism study shows that the nanoshell is formed prior to the surface nanofibers. The whole growth process is highly dependent on the interface misfits of materials. Thus, selected preparation of nanoshell or shell/fiber nanostructure is allowed for many materials research needs. This unique heteroepitaxy relationship is general for rutile oxides and potentially general for many different tunnel oxides. For more information, please read the Communication “Heteroepitaxial Growth of Nanoscale Oxide Shell/Fiber Superstructures by Mild Hydrothermal Processes” by S. L. Suib et al., beginning on page 988.

Ancillary