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Quantum dots: Small 10/2010

Authors

  • Hongguang Liu,

    1. Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS)Department of Radiology Stanford University Medical Center California, LA 94305 (USA)
    2. Institute of Radiation Medicine Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Peking Union Medical College Tsinghua University, Tianjin, 300192 (P.R. China)
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  • Xiaofen Zhang,

    1. Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS)Department of Radiology Stanford University Medical Center California, LA 94305 (USA)
    2. Institute of Radiation Medicine Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Peking Union Medical College Tsinghua University, Tianjin, 300192 (P.R. China)
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  • Bengang Xing,

    1. Division of Chemistry and Biological chemistry School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences Nanyang Technological University Singapore 637371 (Singapore)
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  • Peizhen Han,

    1. Institute of Radiation Medicine Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Peking Union Medical College Tsinghua University, Tianjin, 300192 (P.R. China)
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  • Sanjiv Sam Gambhir,

    1. Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS)Department of Radiology Stanford University Medical Center California, LA 94305 (USA)
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  • Zhen Cheng

    Corresponding author
    1. Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS)Department of Radiology Stanford University Medical Center California, LA 94305 (USA)
    • Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS)Department of Radiology Stanford University Medical Center California, LA 94305 (USA).
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Abstract

original image

The cover picture shows a new method to illuminate quantum dots (QDs) by radiation luminescence as an internal light source. Taking advantage of the radioactive luminescent light at the visible and NIR range, many different fluorophores such as QDs can be exited to emit fluorescence for optical imaging. Three CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs are chosen and irradiated by a β emitter, 131I. The excited QDs can produce fluorescence for both in vitro and in vivo imaging. This study demonstrates an alternate strategy for the design of self-illuminating optical-imaging agents. Radiation-luminescence-excited fluorophores could also be readily adapted for dual-modality imaging. For more information, please read the Communication “Radiation-Luminescence-Excited Quantum Dots for in vivo Multiplexed Optical Imaging” by Z. Cheng et al., beginning on page 1087.

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