Get access

Multicomponent DNA-Templated Nanoparticle Chains with Controllable Dimension and Composition

Authors

  • Pengfei Wang,

    1. Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907–2032, USA
    2. Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907–2032, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hamsa Jaganathan,

    1. Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907–2032, USA
    2. Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907–2032, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Albena Ivanisevic

    Corresponding author
    1. Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907–2032, USA
    2. Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907–2032, USA
    • Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 206 S. Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907–2032, USA.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

original image

Multicomponent DNA-templated nanoparticle chains with controllable dimension and composition are fabricated by joining nanoparticle (NP)-coated DNA fragments with asymmetric sticky overhangs in a specific pattern. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the proton relaxation properties for two- segmented multicomponent structures. The position, composition, and the pattern of the NP chains has an influence on proton relaxation.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary