A Light Trigger for DNA Nanotechnology

Authors

  • Thortsen L. Schmidt,

    1. Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, 3 Blackfan Circle, 02130 Boston, MA, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this research.
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  • Martin B. Koeppel,

    1. Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University Hospital of Cologne, Goldenfelsstr. 19–21, 50935 Cologne, Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this research.
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  • Julie Thevarpadam,

    1. Goethe-University Frankfurt, Cluster of Excellence Macromolecular Complexes, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt/M., Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this research.
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  • Diana P. N. Gonçalves,

    1. Goethe-University Frankfurt, Cluster of Excellence Macromolecular Complexes, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt/M., Germany
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  • Alexander Heckel

    Corresponding author
    1. Goethe-University Frankfurt, Cluster of Excellence Macromolecular Complexes, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt/M., Germany
    • Goethe-University Frankfurt, Cluster of Excellence Macromolecular Complexes, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt/M., Germany.
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Abstract

original image

DNA minicircles with light-activated ‘caged’ interaction modules—based either on sticky ends or G-quadruplex interactions—do not form dimers until they are irradiated with near-UV light (not harmful for DNA). This technology offers a level of spatiotemporal (hybridization) control for functional nanoarchitectures.

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