Nanoscale Origami for 3D Optics

Authors

  • Jeong-Hyun Cho,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Michael D. Keung,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Niels Verellen,

    1. imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
    2. INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Department of Physics and Astronomy, K. U. Leuven Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Liesbet Lagae,

    1. imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
    2. INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Department of Physics and Astronomy, K. U. Leuven Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Victor V. Moshchalkov,

    1. INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Department of Physics and Astronomy, K. U. Leuven Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Pol Van Dorpe,

    1. imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • David H. Gracias

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
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Abstract

original image

Nanoscale self-folding of electron-beam lithography patterned templates is used to create 3D devices for optics and biosensing.

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