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Small-Caliber Vascular Prosthesis Prototype Based on Controlled Release of Heparin from Mesochannels and Its Enhanced Biocompatibility

Authors

  • Yu Zhou,

    1. Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
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  • Kun Li,

    1. Department of Vascular Surgery, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008, China
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  • Jia Yuan Yang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
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  • Chen Xi Guan,

    1. Ecomaterials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
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  • Ying Wang,

    1. Ecomaterials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
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  • Chang Jian Liu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Vascular Surgery, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008, China
    • Department of Vascular Surgery, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008, China
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  • Jian Hua Zhu

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
    • Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China.
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Abstract

A novel small-caliber vascular prosthesis prototype is proposed on the basis of a new heparin release system, that is, the controlled delivery of heparin from mesochannels. Fabrication of mesochannels on artificial biomaterials is successfully achieved through epitaxial growth of mesoporous silica nanoparticles on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene grafts, and thus heparin can be immobilized through a space limitation effect, thereby avoiding the loss of bioactivity and enabling long-lasting release. The adsorption and release of heparin are controlled by adjusting the adsorbate–adsorbent interaction through tailoring the mesostructure. Owing to the continuous and sustained release of heparin, the performances of artificial vessels are greatly improved, thus paving a new way to prepare functional blood-contacting biomaterials with high biocompatibility.

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