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Surface Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes Impacts the Growth and Expression of Water Channel Protein in Tomato Plants

Authors

  • Hector Villagarcia,

    1. Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA
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  • Enkeleda Dervishi,

    1. Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA
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  • Kanishka de Silva,

    1. Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA
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  • Alexandru S. Biris,

    Corresponding author
    1. Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA
    2. Nanotechnology Center, Department of Systems Engineering, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA
    • Nanotechnology Center, Department of Systems Engineering, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA.
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  • Mariya V. Khodakovskaya

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA
    • Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA
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Abstract

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Specific properties of carbon nanotubes, such as their level of agglomeration in the medium and their surface characteristics, can be critical for the physiological response of plants upon application of carbon nanotubes. The correlations among the level of aggregation, the type of functional group on the surface of the carbon nanotubes, and the growth performance of tomato plants are documented.

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