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3D Nanofabrication: Nanoscale Origami for 3D Optics (Small 14/2011)

Authors

  • Jeong-Hyun Cho,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Michael D. Keung,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Niels Verellen,

    1. imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
    2. INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Department of Physics and Astronomy, K. U. Leuven Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Liesbet Lagae,

    1. imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
    2. INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Department of Physics and Astronomy, K. U. Leuven Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Victor V. Moshchalkov,

    1. INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Department of Physics and Astronomy, K. U. Leuven Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Pol Van Dorpe,

    1. imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • David H. Gracias

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    2. Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
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Abstract

original image

The cover image shows 500 nm scaled dielectric cubes with precise metal patterns (50 nm line width) including functional optical elements such as split-ring resonators (SRRs) on all faces. The cubes fold up spontaneously during the plasma etching of electron-beampatterned panels. This self-folding enables origami-inspired approaches to be extended to the nanoscale, allowing precisely patterned 3D structures to be self-assembled from flat (2D) panels in a parallel manner. Compared to planar patterns, arrangements of optically active elements in polyhedral geometries can augment functionality for optics and biosensing. For more information, please read the Communication “Nanoscale Origami for 3D Optics” by D. H. Gracias and co-workers, beginning on page 1943.

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