Adaptive Fabrication of a Flexible Electrode by Optically Self-Selected Interfacial Adhesion and Its Application to Highly Transparent and Conductive Film

Authors

  • Bongchul Kang,

    1. KAIST Institute for Optical Science and Technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, South Korea
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  • Jinho Yun,

    1. KAIST Institute for Optical Science and Technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, South Korea
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  • Sung-Gaun Kim,

    1. Mechanical Engineering, Kongju National University, Cheonan 314-701, South Korea
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  • Minyang Yang

    Corresponding author
    1. KAIST Institute for Optical Science and Technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, South Korea
    • KAIST Institute for Optical Science and Technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, South Korea.
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Abstract

A novel adaptive electrode fabrication method using optically self-selected interfacial adhesion between a laser-processed metal layer and polymer film is introduced to fabricate cost-effectively a high-resolution arbitrary electrode with high conductivity. The quality is close to that from vacuum deposition on a highly heat sensitive polymer film, with active response to various design requirements. A highly conductive metal film (resistivity: 3.6 μΩ cm) below a 5 μm line width with a uniform stepwise profile and mirror surface quality (Rrms: 5–6 nm) is fabricated on a cheap polymer film with a heat resistance limit of below 100 °C. Severe durability tests are successfully completed without using any adhesion promoters. Finally, a highly transparent and conductive electrode with a transparency above 95% and sheet resistance of less than 10 Ω sq−1 is fabricated on a polymer film and on glass by using this method. These results can help realize a potential high-throughput, low-cost, solution-processable replacement for transparent conductive oxides.

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