Biodegradable Nanocapsules as siRNA Carriers for Mutant K-Ras Gene Silencing of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

Authors

  • Guimiao Lin,

    1. School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
    2. The key lab of Biomedical Engineering and Research, Institute of Uropoiesis and Reproduction, School of Medical Sciences, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060, China
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  • Rui Hu,

    1. School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
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  • Wing-Cheung Law,

    1. Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-4200, USA
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  • Chih-Kuang Chen,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-4200, USA
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  • Yucheng Wang,

    1. School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
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  • Hui Li Chin,

    1. Division of Structural Biology & Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
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  • Quoc Toan Nguyen,

    1. Division of Structural Biology & Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
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  • Cheng Kee Lai,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-4200, USA
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  • Ho Sup Yoon,

    1. Division of Structural Biology & Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
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  • Xiaomei Wang,

    1. The key lab of Biomedical Engineering and Research, Institute of Uropoiesis and Reproduction, School of Medical Sciences, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060, China
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  • Gaixia Xu,

    1. The key lab of Biomedical Engineering and Research, Institute of Uropoiesis and Reproduction, School of Medical Sciences, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060, China
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  • Ling Ye,

    1. Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China
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  • Chong Cheng,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-4200, USA
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  • Ken-Tye Yong

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
    • School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore.
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Abstract

The application of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based RNA interference (RNAi) for cancer gene therapy has attracted great attention. Gene therapy is a promising strategy for cancer treatment because it is relatively non-invasive and has a higher therapeutic specificity than chemotherapy. However, without the use of safe and efficient carriers, siRNAs cannot effectively penetrate the cell membranes and RNAi is impeded. In this work, cationic poly(lactic acid) (CPLA)-based degradable nanocapsules (NCs) are utilized as novel carriers of siRNA for effective gene silencing of pancreatic cancer cells. These CPLA-NCs can readily form nanoplexes with K-Ras siRNA and over 90% transfection efficiency is achieved using the nanoplexes. Cell viability studies show that the nanoparticles are highly biocompatible and non-toxic, indicating that CPLA-NC is a promising potential candidate for gene therapy in a clinical setting.

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