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Switchable Nanodumbbell Probes for Analyte Detection

Authors

  • Phyllis F. Xu,

    1. Department of Nanoengineering and Materials Science Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, M/C 0448, La Jolla, CA 92093-0448, USA
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  • Albert M. Hung,

    1. Department of Nanoengineering and Materials Science Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, M/C 0448, La Jolla, CA 92093-0448, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, North Carolina A&T State University, 2907 East Lee St., Suite 208, Greensboro, NC 27401, USA
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  • Hyunwoo Noh,

    1. Department of Nanoengineering and Materials Science Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, M/C 0448, La Jolla, CA 92093-0448, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
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  • Jennifer N. Cha

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nanoengineering and Materials Science Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, M/C 0448, La Jolla, CA 92093-0448, USA
    • Department of Nanoengineering and Materials Science Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, M/C 0448, La Jolla, CA 92093-0448, USA.
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Abstract

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Nanodumbbell gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dimers connected by DNA show significant change in interparticle distance in the presence of a specific analyte, ATP. The nanodumbbell begins in an extended state, but after the addition of the analyte, the DNA connecting the AuNPs forms a stable hairpin, which causes a large decrease in the interparticle distance.

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