In-Vitro Permeability of Neutral Polystyrene Particles via Buccal Mucosa

Authors

  • Birgit Johanna Teubl,

    1. Karl Franzens University of Graz, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences/Pharmaceutical Technology, Humboldtstrasse 46, Graz 8010, Austria
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  • Claudia Meindl,

    1. Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, Stiftingtalstraße 24, Graz 8010, Austria
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  • Andreas Eitzlmayr,

    1. Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering GmbH, Inffeldgasse 13, Graz 8010, Austria
    2. Institute for Process and Particle Engineering, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 21, Graz 8010, Austria
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  • Andreas Zimmer,

    1. Karl Franzens University of Graz, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences/Pharmaceutical Technology, Humboldtstrasse 46, Graz 8010, Austria
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  • Eleonore Fröhlich,

    1. Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, Stiftingtalstraße 24, Graz 8010, Austria
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  • Eva Roblegg

    Corresponding author
    1. Karl Franzens University of Graz, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences/Pharmaceutical Technology, Humboldtstrasse 46, Graz 8010, Austria
    2. Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering GmbH, Inffeldgasse 13, Graz 8010, Austria
    • Karl Franzens University of Graz, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences/Pharmaceutical Technology, Humboldtstrasse 46, Graz 8010, Austria.
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Abstract

Drugs can be absorbed well in the oral cavity, which eliminates problems related to intestinal and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Although it is well-established that nanoparticles are small enough to penetrate/permeate epithelial barriers, there is no clear understanding of how they interact with the buccal mucosa. This work provides useful information regarding particle properties with regard to mucosal uptake and can be used for the rational design of nanocarriers. In the buccal mucosa, the uptake of neutral polystyrene nanoparticles (PP) is size-dependent. Compared to 25 and 50 nm particles, 200 nm PP particles penetrate into deeper regions of the mucosa. This is attributed to the structure of the buccal mucosa, i.e., mucus layer and microplicae. The particles permeate the mucus layer and deposit in ridge-like folds of superficial buccal cells. Thus, the effects of thermodynamic driving forces and/or interparticle electrostatic repulsion are enhanced and cellular uptake might be reduced for smaller particle sizes.

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