Facile Colloidal Lithography on Rough and Non-planar Surfaces for Asymmetric Patterning

Authors

  • Samuel A. Pendergraph,

    1. Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003-9263, USA
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  • Jin Young Park,

    1. Department of Renewable Energy Engineering, Energy Resources Engineering, Jungwon University, Chungcheongbuk-do, 367-805, South Korea
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  • Nicholas R. Hendricks,

    1. Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003-9263, USA
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  • Alfred J. Crosby,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003-9263, USA
    • Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003-9263, USA.
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  • Kenneth R. Carter

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003-9263, USA
    • Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003-9263, USA.
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Abstract

original image

Free-standing colloidal arrays can be easily transferred to supported fibers. These films conform and provide the template to have consistent submicrometer and nanometer features transferred to the periphery of rough, 7 μm diameter fibers. This technique is adjustable to a number of fiber surfaces and colloidal template sizes.

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