Self-Assembly: Liquid Crystal Order in Colloidal Suspensions of Spheroidal Particles by Direct Current Electric Field Assembly (Small 10/2012)

Authors

  • Aayush A. Shah,

    1. Program of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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  • Heekyoung Kang,

    1. School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Kevin L. Kohlstedt,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 3410 G.G. Brown, 2300 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136
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  • Kyung Hyun Ahn,

    1. School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Sharon C. Glotzer,

    1. Program of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    3. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 3410 G.G. Brown, 2300 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136
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  • Charles W. Monroe,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 3410 G.G. Brown, 2300 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136
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  • Michael J. Solomon

    Corresponding author
    1. Program of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 3410 G.G. Brown, 2300 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136
    • Program of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
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Abstract

original image

The cover picture features the self-assembly of anisotropic colloidal particles, which can improve the fundamental understanding of crystallization and the glass transition as well as be applied for materials with advanced optical and mechanical properties. A DC electric field device is used to rapidly self-assemble spheroids. The main image depicts a suspension of colloidal spheroids subject to a DC electric field, which leads to the formation of a crystalline phase. The confocal microscopy (CLSM) image of one such structure is shown between the electrodes, and the upper left corner shows a 3D rendering of the assembly, as generated by image processing of CLSM results. The electric field device is overlaid on a scanning electron microscopy image of the disordered spheroids, and the background image is a larger-scale confocal microscopy image of an electric-field-induced assembly. For further information, please read the Full Paper “Liquid Crystal Order in Colloidal Suspensions of Spheroidal Particles” by M. J. Solomon and co-workers beginning on page 1551. Image credit: Benjamin Schultz, Mahesh Ganesan, and Aayush A. Shah.

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