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Metal Oxides: Zebrafish High-Throughput Screening to Study the Impact of Dissolvable Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on the Hatching Enzyme, ZHE1 (Small 9–10/2013)

Authors

  • Sijie Lin,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
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  • Yan Zhao,

    1. Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA,
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  • Zhaoxia Ji,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
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  • Jason Ear,

    1. Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA,
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  • Chong Hyun Chang,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
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  • Haiyuan Zhang,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
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  • Cecile Low-Kam,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
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  • Kristin Yamada,

    1. Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
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  • Huan Meng,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
    2. Division of NanoMedicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
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  • Xiang Wang,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
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  • Rong Liu,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
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  • Suman Pokhrel,

    1. IWT Foundation Institute of Materials Science, Department of Production Engineering, University of Bremen, Germany
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  • Lutz Mädler,

    1. IWT Foundation Institute of Materials Science, Department of Production Engineering, University of Bremen, Germany
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  • Robert Damoiseaux,

    1. Molecular Shared Screening Resources, California NanoSystem Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
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  • Tian Xia,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
    2. Division of NanoMedicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
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  • Hilary A. Godwin,

    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
    2. Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
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  • Shuo Lin,

    1. Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA,
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  • André E. Nel

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107
    2. Division of NanoMedicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
    • Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, Tel: (310) 825-6620, Fax: (310) 206-8107.
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Abstract

original image

Zebrafish is emerging as a model organism for the safety assessment and hazard ranking of engineered nanomaterials. On page 1776, A. E. Nel and co-workers showcase a highly automated high-throughput screening (HTS) platform using zebrafish embryos for the hazard assessment of 24 representative metal oxide nanoparticles. Through HTS analysis, four metal oxide nanoparticles are found to interfere with zebrafish embryo hatching. It is further demonstrated that hatching interference is a result of toxic metal ion shed from nanoparticles, compromising the zebrafish hatching enzyme 1 (ZHE1) activity. The structural and functional similarities of hatching enzymes across fish species suggest that the ZHE1 mechanistic paradigm could be used to predict the toxicity of a large number of engineered nanoparticles that may be hazardous to aquatic species.

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