Biomineralization: Physicochemical and Biological Properties of Biomimetic Mineralo-Protein Nanoparticles Formed Spontaneously in Biological Fluids (Small 13/2013)

Authors

  • Hsin-Hsin Peng,

    1. Laboratory of Nanomaterials, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    2. Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work.
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  • Cheng-Yeu Wu,

    1. Laboratory of Nanomaterials, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    2. Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    3. Research Center of Bacterial Pathogenesis, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work.
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  • David Young,

    1. Laboratory of Nanomaterials, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work.
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  • Jan Martel,

    1. Laboratory of Nanomaterials, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    2. Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    Current affiliation:
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work.
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  • Andrew Young,

    1. Laboratory of Nanomaterials, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    2. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • David M. Ojcius,

    1. Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    2. Health Sciences Research Institute and Molecular Cell Biology, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, CA 95343, USA
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  • Yu-Hsiu Lee,

    1. Laboratory of Nanomaterials, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    2. Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
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  • John D. Young

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA
    2. Laboratory of Nanomaterials, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    3. Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Gueishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
    4. Biochemical Engineering Research Center, Ming Chi University of Technology, 84 Gungjuan Road, Taishan, Taipei 24301, Taiwan
    • Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA.

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Abstract

original image

The properties of biological mineralo-protein nanoparticles that form spontaneously in human body fluids are described by J. D. Young and co-workers on page 2297. Concentrations of serum and precipitating ions near physiological levels produce small biomimetic nanoparticles that grow steadily in size but retain a similar protein profile irrespective of size. These biological mineral particles are phagocytosed by immune cells and they activate pro-inflammatory responses in a size-dependent manner.

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