Small

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 11

November 2008

Volume 4, Issue 11

Pages 1851–2083

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Small 11/2008

      Brian J. Jordan, Yuval Ofir, Debabrata Patra, Stuart T. Caldwell, Andrew Kennedy, Steven Joubanian, Gouher Rabani, Graeme Cooke and Vincent M. Rotello

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows scanning electron microscopy images of organic nanowires and platelets. High-aspect- ratio nanowires were formed via synergistic hydrogen bonding and dipole–dipole interactions of a hydrogen-bonding azobenzene flavin system. In contrast, micrometer-size platelets were formed using a highly analogous non-hydrogen-bonding molecule. Co-precipitation of the two analogous molecules provides efficient control over both nanowire length and diameter. This strategy offers an opportunity to engineer supramolecularassemblies with well-defined size, shape, and morphology for electronic and optical applications. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Controlled Self-Assembly of Organic Nanowires and Platelets using Dipolar and Hydrogen Bonding Interactions” by G. Cooke, V. M. Rotello, et al. beginning on page 2074.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Contents: Small 11/2008 (pages 1851–1859)

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890054

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
  4. Correspondences

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Semiconductor nanocrystals

      On the Interpretation of Colloidal Quantum-Dot Absorption Spectra (pages 1866–1868)

      Iwan Moreels and Zeger Hens

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800068

      Concerns are expressed regarding the interpretation of absorption spectra for colloidal quantum dots. Using the work presented in this journal by R. Koole et al. (Small, 2008,4, 127) as an example, the correspondents cast doubt on the role of Raleigh scattering as a background source in these spectra, and the use of second-derivative analysis in resolving electronic transitions.

    2. Response Concerning “On the Interpretation of Colloidal Quantum Dot Absorption Spectra” (pages 1869–1870)

      Rolf Koole, Guy Allan, Christophe Delerue, Daniel Vanmaekelbergh, Arjan J. Houtepen and Andries Meijerink

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800488

      In response to the correspondence of I. Moreels and Prof. Z. Hens, the authors of the manuscript “Optical Investigation of Quantum Confinement in PbSe Nanocrystals at Different Points in the Brillouin Zone” address, with reference to their original work, the doubts raised regarding absorption-spectra interpretation.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Nanowire heterointerfaces

      Heterointerfaces in Semiconductor Nanowires (pages 1872–1893)

      Ritesh Agarwal

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800556

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Semiconductor nanowires have unique properties such as highly anisotropic geometry, large surface-to-volume ratio, and carrier and photon confinement. Currently, tremendous efforts are devoted to the rational synthesis of advanced nanowire heterostructures (see image). For functional devices to be made from these materials, precise control over composition, structure, morphology, and dopant concentration is needed. Progress, promise, and challenges in the area of nanowire heterostructured materials are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the effect of different types of heterointerfaces on device properties.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Light-emitting polymers

      Sub-50-nm Conjugated Polymer Dots by Nanoprinting (pages 1894–1899)

      Elisa Mele, Andrea Camposeo, Milena De Giorgi, Francesca Di Benedetto, Carmela De Marco, Vittorianna Tasco, Roberto Cingolani and Dario Pisignano

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Isolated organic light-emitting dots with lateral dimensions down to the 10-nm scale are realized by direct particle replication on conjugated polymers (see image). The emission properties of the realized nanostructures, exhibiting blue-shift up to 90 meV with respect to reference film samples, demonstrate the occurrence of excitation-transfer spatial-confinement effects in the conjugated polymer particles.

    2. Self-assembly

      Electrostatic Self-Assembly of Charged Colloids and Macromolecules in a Fluidic Nanoslit (pages 1900–1906)

      Madhavi Krishnan, Zdeněk Petrášek, Ingolf Mönch and Petra Schwille

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Negatively charged colloidal nanospheres (left) and DNA (right) self assemble along contours of like-charged SiO2 domains patterned in a fluidic nanoslit. The attractive interactions driving this static self-assembly process manifest in solution at low ionic strength and slit depths of around 100 nm. Scale bar represents 10 µm.

    3. Carbon nanotubes

      Field-Emission Characteristics of Individual Carbon Nanotubes with a Conical Tip: The Validity of the Fowler–Nordheim Theory and Maximum Emission Current (pages 1907–1912)

      Ming-Sheng Wang, Qing Chen and Lian-Mao Peng

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using the field-emission (FE)-induced evaporation technique, carbon-nanotube (CNT) caps with continuously varying radii from subnanometer to 2.5 nm are obtained on individual CNTs with a conical tip. It is found that 1 nm may be considered as a practical critical radius for the applicability of the Fowler–Nordheim theory for capped CNTs, and the maximum stable FE current is dominated by the CNT cap structure.

    4. Dual-scale structures

      Generation and Self-Replication of Monolithic, Dual-Scale Polymer Structures by Two-Step Capillary-Force Lithography (pages 1913–1918)

      Hoon Eui Jeong, Rhokyun Kwak, Jae Kwan Kim and Kahp Y. Suh

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inhibition effects in UV radiation curing caused by oxygen are used for fabricating monolithic, micro/nanoscale hierarchical polymer structures via a two-step UV-assisted capillary molding technique (see image). Using this approach, various dual-scale polymer structures are created within a few minutes with precise control over geometrical parameters.

    5. Nanopattern fabrication

      Large-Scale Fabrication of Bi-Functional Nanostructured Polymer Surfaces for Selective Biomolecular Adhesion (pages 1919–1924)

      Stéphane Mornet, Frédéric Brétagnol, Ilaria Mannelli, Andrea Valsesia, Lucel Sirghi, Pascal Colpo and Francois Rossi

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200701162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A method for the fabrication of nanopatterned surfaces consisting of sub-100-nm poly(acrylic acid) domains in an antifouling poly(ethylene oxide)-like film is investigated. The possibility of using monolayer films of hard silica nanospheres (see image) as nanomasks, without an etching procedure, is demonstrated. The method is suitable for the preparation of nanostructured protein arrays.

    6. Metallic nanoparticles

      Metallic Iron Nanoparticles for MRI Contrast Enhancement and Local Hyperthermia (pages 1925–1929)

      Costas G. Hadjipanayis, Michael J. Bonder, Srinivasan Balakrishnan, Xiaoxia Wang, Hui Mao and George C. Hadjipanayis

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New metallic magnetic nanoparticles with greater magnetic properties than current iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of comparable size (10 nm) are described. The multifunctional iron-based NPs coated with biocompatible carboxyl-terminated polyethylene glycol (see image) generate more effective local hyperthermia when subjected to an oscillating magnetic field and have a stronger MRI T2 shortening effect than IONPs.

    7. Nanoparticle arrays

      Direct-Write Nanoparticle Microarrays for Cell Assays (pages 1930–1935)

      Kyung-Jin Jang and Jwa-Min Nam

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800270

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple and straightforward method for creating nanoparticle microarrays on poly(ethylene glycol) brushes by using a noncontact microarrayer provides cellular nanoenvironment platforms for high-throughput and high-content cell assays on a single chip. Better transfection efficiency, cell proliferation, and cell survival are observed when cells are assayed on the nanofeatured surface (see image) than when they were assayed on a flat glass surface without nanofeatures.

    8. Nanotube composites

      The Role of Interfacial Oxygen Atoms in the Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon-Nanotube-Reinforced Metal Matrix Nanocomposites (pages 1936–1940)

      Kyung Tae Kim, Seung Il Cha, Thomas Gemming, Jürgen Eckert and Soon Hyung Hong

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200701223

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chemically bonded oxygen atoms at the carbon nanotube (CNT)/metal interface provide strong bonding between CNTs and a metal matrix (see picture). The origin of the enhanced mechanical properties of CNT/Cu is analyzed by the load-transfer concept and oxygen atoms are found to be a key factor in the construction of strong CNT/metal composites.

    9. Biomimetic assembly

      Adenovirus Knob Trimers as Tailorable Scaffolds for Nanoscale Assembly (pages 1941–1944)

      Mathew M. Maye, Paul Freimuth and Oleg Gang

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800177

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The biomimetic assembly of nanoparticles into controllable nanostructures hinges on the ability to regulate system reactivity. The introduction of structural elements with predesigned symmetries and quantized number of binding sites may aid in this effort. Symmetric adenovirus knob proteins are used as scaffolds for nano-assembly (see image). By way of genetic mutation, solvent-accessible Cys residues are incorporated onto a knob's trimeric surface, and the resulting symmetric tridentate crosslinker is shown to possess tunable assembly characteristics with gold nanoparticles.

    10. Anodic alumina

      Vapor-Phase Synthesis of Mesostructured Silica Nanofibers Inside Porous Alumina Membranes (pages 1945–1949)

      Kyung Jin Lee, Sa Hoon Min and Jyongsik Jang

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mesoporous silica nanofibers with tunable mesostructure (see image) are prepared in anodic aluminum oxide cationic-surfactant dual templates using vapor-deposition hydrolysis, which has merits in mass production. The microstructure of the mesoporous silica nanofibers changes from parallel to helical alignment as the alkyl-chain length of the surfactant is decreased.

    11. Cell-delivery microscaffolds

      Triple Constructs Consisting of Nanoparticles and Microspheres for Bone-Marrow-Derived Stromal-Cell-Delivery Microscaffolds (pages 1950–1955)

      Ji Sun Park, Kyeongsoon Park, Dae Gyun Woo, Han Na Yang, Hyung-Min Chung and Keun-Hong Park

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200701315

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effective stabilization of 2- and 3D assemblies of heparin/poly(l-lysine) nanoparticles is achieved through embedment in DHEA- and DEXA-loaded poly(l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (see image). These structures, which have great potential for use in cell delivery and for tissue regeneration, are manufactured using layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly, and are shown to have a positive effect on bone-marrow stromal cell aggregation and differentiation.

    12. Multifunctional particles

      Voltage-Controllable Magnetic Composite Based on Multifunctional Polyethylene Microparticles (pages 1956–1958)

      A. Ghosh, N. K. Sheridon and P. Fischer

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200701301

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Micromagnets with collinear electric and magnetic dipole moments are embedded in a polymer to form a magnetic composite (see image). Each particle is a micromagnet that sits in a fluid-filled cavity in which it is free to rotate. Under the application of a voltage, the multifunctional particles align with the applied electrostatic field to give rise to a net magnetization.

    13. Field-effect transistors

      Doping-Free Nanoscale Complementary Carbon-Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors with DNA-Templated Molecular Lithography (pages 1959–1963)

      Kuk-Hwan Kim, Ju-Hyun Kim, Xing-Jiu Huang, Seung Min Yoo, Sang Yup Lee and Yang-Kyu Choi

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800226

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A comprehensive methodology that enables cost-effective and reproducible fabrication for doping-free complementary carbon-nanotube field-effect transistors with molecular-scale nanogaps is presented (see image). Incorporating top-down/bottom-up dualities, numerous SWNTs are localized at a predefined active region and interconnected via a DNA-templated nanogap.

    14. Nanocomposites

      Composite Carbon Nanotube/Silica Fibers with Improved Mechanical Strengths and Electrical Conductivities (pages 1964–1967)

      Huisheng Peng, Menka Jain, Dean E. Peterson, Yuntian Zhu and Quanxi Jia

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two approaches to the synthesis of composite carbon nanotube/silica fibers in which the carbon nanotubes are highly aligned are investigated, one involving directly casting and the other using surface modification to induce hydrogen bonding between the carbon nanotubes and a silica precursor. Due to the nanotube alignment, these composites (see image) exhibit high strength and conductivity, and good chemical and thermal stability, and are expected to find applications in many advanced applications.

    15. Ferromagnetic nanocrystals

      Synthesis of Ultrasmall Ferromagnetic Face-Centered Tetragonal FePt–Graphite Core–Shell Nanocrystals (pages 1968–1971)

      Won Seok Seo, Se Mi Kim, Young-Min Kim, Xiaoming Sun and Hongjie Dai

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800257

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A graphite coat: Ultrasmall L10-ordered face-centered tetragonal FePt–graphite shell nanocrystals were synthesized by a simple one-step CVD process. Particles with sizes between 1 and 3 nm were readily obtained by varying the amount of metal precursors loaded on a silica support. FePt–graphite shell nanocrystals with mean diameter ≈2.8 nm (see picture) exhibit ferromagnetism with relatively high coercivity at room temperature and superior chemical stability against etching and oxidation.

    16. Biomimetics

      Biomimetic Antireflective Si Nanopillar Arrays (pages 1972–1975)

      Hongbo Xu, Nan Lu, Dianpeng Qi, Juanyuan Hao, Liguo Gao, Bo Zhang and Lifeng Chi

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800282

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biomimetic antireflective Si nanopillar arrays are created using self-assembled polymer-sphere monolayers as etching masks (see image). These tapered Si nanopillar arrays can greatly suppress the reflectivity of Si. This method provides a facile approach for producing antireflection (AR) surfaces on large areas with low cost and high throughput.

    17. Templated synthesis

      DNA-Mediated Synthesis of Microporous Single-Crystal-Like NaTi2(PO4)3 Nanospheres (pages 1976–1979)

      Jiehua Liu, Jianling Zhang, Siqing Cheng, Zhimin Liu and Buxing Han

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800284

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      Microporous, highly monodisperse single-crystal-like NaTi2(PO4)3 nanoparticles with a strong acidic surface and uniform size are prepared by using calf thymus DNA as a structure-directing agent under acidic conditions. The nanoparticles (see image) were very active, stable, and selective catalysts for the ketalization of cyclohexanone and 1,2-ethanediol to cyclohexanone ethylene ketal.

    18. SERS

      Nanoparticle-Decorated Nanocanals for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 1980–1984)

      Hyunhyub Ko and Vladimir V. Tsukruk

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800301

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoparticle-decorated nanocanal arrays show significant enhancement of Raman scattering for a model explosive-related dinitrotoluene compound. The Raman scattering by gold nanoparticles distributed along nanocanals (see image) is efficiently combined with optical-wave guiding to allow significant surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Fullerenes

      Real-Time Translocation of Fullerene Reveals Cell Contraction (pages 1986–1992)

      Emppu Salonen, Sijie Lin, Michelle L. Reid, Marcus Allegood, Xi Wang, Apparao M. Rao, Ilpo Vattulainen and Pu Chun Ke

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200701279

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The interaction of fullerene with natural phenolic acid is shown to induce cell contraction, through a consideration of the interaction between the fullerene C70 and phenol gallic acid (GA). The self-assembly of C70–GA complexes is investigated using both experiments and simulations (see image), and the translocation and aggregation of these complexes across the cell membrane is observed to have an effect on cell function, ultimately leading to cytotoxicity and cell death.

    2. Helical nanofibers

      Construction of Helical Nanofibers from Self-Assembling Pseudopeptide Building Blocks: Modulating the Handedness and Breaking the Helicity (pages 1993–2005)

      Samit Guha, Michael G. B. Drew and Arindam Banerjee

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800002

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Give them a hand! The construction of helical nanofibers, the reversal of the helical nature of the nanofibers, and the breakage of the helicity of these nanofibers are successfully demonstrated by using suitable self-assembling pseudopeptide-based molecular building blocks (see image). The molecular structure, chirality, and type of supramolecular structure all play an important role in governing the shape and chiral nature of the nanostructure.

    3. Quantum dots

      CdTe Nanoparticles Display Tropism to Core Histones and Histone-Rich Cell Organelles (pages 2006–2015)

      Jennifer Conroy, Stephen J. Byrne, Yurii K. Gun'ko, Yury P. Rakovich, John F. Donegan, Anthony Davies, Dermot Kelleher and Yuri Volkov

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800088

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Unmodified quantum dots are capable of a strikingly rapid accumulation in the nuclei and nucleoli of living phagocytes in vitro. Using a combination of advanced technological approaches, including live cell confocal microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (see image), spectroscopic methods, and zeta potential measurements, it is shown that these QDs preferentially bind to the positively charged core histone proteins.

    4. Microgels

      Design of Multicomponent Microgels by Selective Deposition of Nanomaterials (pages 2016–2024)

      Jessica Hain, Marc Schrinner, Yan Lu and Andrij Pich

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800149

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multicomponent microgels are obtained by targeted deposition of different nanomaterials. These aqueous microgels are decorated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanorods through in situ oxidative polymerization (see image). The PEDOT nanorods in the microgel structure are used for selective deposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Microgel/PEDOT/AuNPs hybrid particles with different nanoparticle loadings are obtained and show extraordinary catalytic activity in aqueous medium.

    5. Nanoparticle toxicity

      Assessing Methods for Blood Cell Cytotoxic Responses to Inorganic Nanoparticles and Nanoparticle Aggregates (pages 2025–2034)

      Belén Díaz, Christian Sánchez-Espinel, Manuel Arruebo, José Faro, Encarnación de Miguel, Susana Magadán, Clara Yagüe, Rodrigo Fernández-Pacheco, M. Ricardo Ibarra, Jesús Santamaría and África González-Fernández

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800199

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cellular uptake of five different nanoparticles (NPs) is investigated in vivo with different types of human peripheral blood cells (lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes and erythrocytes), mouse macrophages, and human tumor cell lines (see image). The cytotoxicity, internalization, aggregation in medium, and reactive oxygen species production of the NPs are examined, and differences dependent on both NP and cell type are found.

    6. Carbon nanotubes

      New Insight into Carbon-Nanotube Electronic-Structure Selectivity (pages 2035–2042)

      Bobby G. Sumpter, De-En Jiang and Vincent Meunier

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800298

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electronic-structure selectivity: The efficiency of water-soluble diazonium salts for manipulating carbon nanotubes based on their intrinsic electronic structure is shown to come from an interplay of nanotube metallicity and that of the anion and cation of the salt (see image).

    7. Anticancer micelles

      Doxorubicin-Loaded Polymeric Micelle Overcomes Multidrug Resistance of Cancer by Double-Targeting Folate Receptor and Early Endosomal pH (pages 2043–2050)

      Dongin Kim, Eun Seong Lee, Kyung Taek Oh, Zhong Gao Gao and You Han Bae

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200701275

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To combat multidrug resistance in cancers, a pH-sensitive, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded mixed-micelle system is prepared. A green-fluorescence dye is used to demonstrate that the drug carried by the micelle escapes from the endosomal compartment (see picture). In vitro tests against wild-type and DOX-resistant ovarian carcinoma cell lines suggest that the micelles effectively kill both types.

    8. Conducting polymers

      A General Synthesis for PEDOT-Coated Nonconductive Materials and PEDOT Hollow Particles by Aqueous Chemical Polymerization (pages 2051–2058)

      Shyh-Chyang Luo, Hsiao-hua Yu, Andrew C. A. Wan, Yu Han and Jackie Y. Ying

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Empty vessels: Polystyrene nanoparticles are coated with functionalized PEDOT by chemical polymerization in aqueous solutions to form core/shell nanoparticles. The polystyrene cores can be removed with an organic solvent. The use of toluene to dissolve the cores provides hollow PEDOT particles with single holes. In contrast, when THF is employed to remove the polystyrene core, flat spheres are formed.

    9. Nanocubes

      Direct Observation of the Transition Point Between Quasi-Spherical and Cubic Nanoparticles in a Two-Step Seed-Mediated Growth Method (pages 2059–2066)

      Ekaterina Dovgolevsky and Hossam Haick

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800207

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A direct exploration of the shape transformation of quasi-spherical Au seeds to nanocubes shows an abrupt cuboctahedral-to-nanocube transition at a critical size (see image). After most of the cuboctahedral nanoparticles are transformed to nanocubes, the nanoparticles initiate further homogeneous growth. These observations are attributed to a weighted contribution of a kinetic growth mechanism and self-diffusion of metal adatoms.

    10. Nanofibers

      Controlling Nanoparticle Location via Confined Assembly in Electrospun Block Copolymer Nanofibers (pages 2067–2073)

      Vibha Kalra, Jinwoo Lee, Jung Hun Lee, Seung Goo Lee, Manuel Marquez, Ulrich Wiesner and Yong Lak Joo

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800279

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first ever tailored nanofibers with internal confined assembly used as a template to guide nanoparticles are fabricated. The figure shows cross sections of nanofibers with magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in poly(styrene-b-isoprene). The nanoparticles (dark dots) preferentially wet the isoprene domain (dark regions) due to specific surface chemistry. Scale bar is 200 nm.

    11. Organic nanowires

      Controlled Self-Assembly of Organic Nanowires and Platelets Using Dipolar and Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions (pages 2074–2078)

      Brian J. Jordan, Yuval Ofir, Debabrata Patra, Stuart T. Caldwell, Andrew Kennedy, Steven Joubanian, Gouher Rabani, Graeme Cooke and Vincent M. Rotello

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800811

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Synergistic dipole–dipole and hydrogen-bonding interactions are used to assemble nanostructured materials. Precipitation of a hydrogen-bonding donor–acceptor molecule yields nanowires ≈50–150 nm in diameter while a non-hydrogen-bonding analog generates hexagonal platelets (see image). The similarity of the two structures allows intermediate structures to be formed via co-precipitation.

  8. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Keywords Index Small 11/2008 (page 2080)

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890055

  9. Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Authors Index Small 11/2008 (pages 2081–2082)

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890056

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Correspondences
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. coming soon (page 2083)

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890057

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