Small

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 12

December 2008

Volume 4, Issue 12

Pages 2087–2303

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Small 12/2008

      Vladimir Stepanenko and Frank Würthner

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890058

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture illustrates an atomic force microscopy image of hexagonal honeycomb networks created by metal-ion-directed self-assembly of terpyridine-functionalized perylene bisimide dyes. In general, hexagonal networks provide a highly stable lattice of cells that requires the least material to cover a given volume. While the reason why honey bees construct such networks is a matter of debate, the work of Stepanenko and Wurthner elucidates the formation of well-defined nanoscale honeycomb networks of cyclic dye arrays. Such networks of functional colorants might become of considerable interest for photonic and photovoltaic applications if the interior volume were filled with appropriate material. For more information, please read the Communication “Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Cyclic Dye Arrays into Two-Dimensional Honeycomb Nanonetworks” beginning on page 2158.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Contents: Small 12/2008 (pages 2087–2096)

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890059

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. News (pages 2098–2099)

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801701

  4. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Synthetic methods

      Room-Temperature Synthetic Pathways to Barium Titanate Nanocrystals (pages 2102–2106)

      Christopher W. Beier, Marie A. Cuevas and Richard L. Brutchey

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800761

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      BaTiO3 nanocrystals offer exciting possibilities in the areas of miniaturized memory, sensors, and piezoelectrics. Consequently, facile, low-temperature methods of nanocrystal formation are sought after to replace traditional high-temperature methods. This Concept article discusses several room-temperature pathways to well-defined BaTiO3 nanocrystals. The TEM image shows a BaTiO3 nanocrystal formed at room temperature, with its unit cell on the left.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Gold nanoparticles

      Biodistribution of 1.4- and 18-nm Gold Particles in Rats (pages 2108–2111)

      Manuela Semmler-Behnke, Wolfgang G. Kreyling, Jens Lipka, Stefanie Fertsch, Alexander Wenk, Shinji Takenaka, Günter Schmid and Wolfgang Brandau

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800922

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      1.4-nm gold nanoparticles (NPs) are observed to cross the air/blood barrier of the lungs much more efficiently than 18-nm gold NPs (see figure). The NP accumulation pattern in the secondary-target organs differs strongly from those seen after direct intravenous injection. From this, it is hypothesized that NPs interact dynamically with proteins and cells, which determines their accumulation in the various organs.

    2. Core/shell nanowires

      Transmission Electron Microscopy in situ Fabrication of ZnO/Al2O3 Composite Nanotubes by Electron-Beam-Irradiation-Induced Local Etching of ZnO/Al2O3 Core/Shell Nanowires (pages 2112–2117)

      Yang Yang, Roland Scholz, Andreas Berger, Dong Sik Kim, Mato Knez, Dietrich Hesse, Ulrich Gösele and Margit Zacharias

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800795

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      The stability at room temperature of ZnO/Al2O3 core/shell coaxial nanowires exposed to an electron beam in a TEM is investigated. It is found that during irradiation the nanowires transform in situ into ZnO/Al2O3 composite nanotubes (see image). It is suggested that the nanotube formation follows an irradiation-induced local etching of the ZnO core. The most relevant factor in this process is the defective nature of the ZnO nanowire core in combination with the presence of a stable and homogeneous Al2O3 shell.

    3. Nanopillar arrays

      Fabrication of Silicon Nanopillar Teradot Arrays by Electron-Beam Patterning for Nanoimprint Molds (pages 2118–2122)

      Jung-Sub Wi, Hyo-Sung Lee, Kipil Lim, Sung-Wook Nam, Hyun-Mi Kim, Soo-Yeon Park, Jae Jong Lee, Chris Daehoon Hong, Sungho Jin and Ki-Bum Kim

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800625

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      Critical issues that occur during the fabrication of high-density nanostructures by e-beam lithography are considered. A 25-nm-pitch Si nanopillar array and a 15-nm-pitch resist nanodot array are fabricated. Transfer of 1 teradot inch−2 patterns from the nanopillar array to a polymer surface is carried out by nanoimprint lithography (see picture).

    4. Atomic force microscopy

      Probe Tips Functionalized with Colloidal Nanocrystal Tetrapods for High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging (pages 2123–2126)

      Concetta Nobile, Paul D. Ashby, P. James Schuck, Angela Fiore, Rosanna Mastria, Roberto Cingolani, Liberato Manna and Roman Krahne

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800604

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      Tetrapods have the unique property of self-aligning on a flat surface with one arm pointing in the direction perpendicular to the surface plane. The positioning of single tetrapods on the flattened tip of commercial AFM probes (see image) is reported. These tetrapod-functionalized AFM probes are used to image the topography of different samples revealing excellent spatial and vertical resolution.

    5. Nanopatterning

      Piezoelectric Inkjet Printing of Biomimetic Inks for Reactive Surfaces (pages 2127–2130)

      Leila F. Deravi, Jan L. Sumerel, Sarah L. Sewell and David W. Wright

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800536

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      Dendrimer printing: A composite dendrimer ink is developed and patterned onto gold, glass, or sapphire substrates using piezoelectric inkjet printing. Varying the spot spacing, the number of print cycles, and the reaction time with monosilicic acid (see image) provides a microenvironment with properties reminiscent of patterned silica on the cell wall of diatoms.

    6. Nanoarrays

      pH-Responsive Fluorescent Nanoarrays Fabricated by Direct-Write Parallel Dip-Pen Nanolithography (pages 2131–2135)

      Alberto Martínez-Otero, Jordi Hernando, Daniel Ruiz-Molina and Daniel Maspoch

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800481

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      pH-Responsive fluorescein nanoarrays are fabricated through the use of direct-write parallel dip-pen nanolithography (see schematic picture). The reversible pH-induced fluorescence emission change of each fluorescein feature is detected by confocal microscopy after those features are exposed to acidic and basic vapors.

    7. Nanoparticle Growth

      The Role of Amines in the Growth of Terbium(III)-Doped Cerium Phosphate Nanoparticles (pages 2136–2139)

      Katharina Hickmann, Karsten Kömpe, Alexander Hepp and Markus Haase

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800469

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      By varying the type of the amines used in the synthesis of CePO4:Tb nanoparticles it is possible to direct the colloidal solubility in solvents of different polarity (see image). Moreover, it is shown that the resulting particle size is influenced by the concentration of the amine used in synthesis. Particles in the range from 4 to 24 nm in diameter are prepared.

    8. Nanowetting

      Sharp-Cornered Liquid Drops by Wetting of Nanoscale Features (pages 2140–2142)

      Fabrice Birembaut, Nicolas Perney, Katrin Pechstedt, Philip N. Bartlett, Andrea E. Russell and Jeremy J. Baumberg

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800564

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      Serrated-edge droplets: The wetting of metallic microstructures with nanoscale features, used as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering, can result in sharp bending of the droplet edges. Tethering of the liquid/air/substrate contact line induces flows of analyte to particular locations as the droplet recedes during evaporation (see SEM image). Molecules are preferentially deposited in the pyramidal pits on these structures.

    9. Microcontact printing

      White Electroluminescence from a Microcontact-Printing-Deposited CdSe/ZnS Colloidal Quantum-Dot Monolayer (pages 2143–2147)

      Aurora Rizzo, Marco Mazzeo, Mariano Biasiucci, Roberto Cingolani and Giuseppe Gigli

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800350

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      A simple and dry method for colloidal semiconductor nanocrystal (NC) deposition on soluble organic semiconductor layers is developed, consisting of spin coating followed by poly(dimethylsiloxane) transfer. This technique is used to deposit a homogeneous layer of mixed red, green, and blue CdSe/ZnS quantum dots onto an organic multilayer structure (see picture) and to fabricate a heterojunction hybrid organic/inorganic white-light-emitting diode.

    10. Smart minibots

      Biomimetic Soft Multifunctional Miniature Aquabots (pages 2148–2153)

      Gu Han Kwon, Joong Yull Park, Jeong Yoon Kim, Megan L. Frisk, David J. Beebe and Sang-Hoon Lee

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800315

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      Small (micro- to millimeter) soft polymeric aquabots that perform multifunctional operations in aqueous environments, effectively simulating their natural counterparts (see image)are presented. These aquabots have diverse muscle-like locomotive mechanisms as well as integrated organs including body structures, sensors, and drug-releasing systems. The demonstrated functions have potential applications in drug delivery, environmental monitoring, and inspection.

    11. Nanodiamonds

      A Facile and Scalable Process for Size-Controllable Separation of Nanodiamond Particles as Small as 4 nm (pages 2154–2157)

      Yoichi Morita, Tatsuya Takimoto, Hiroshi Yamanaka, Katsumi Kumekawa, Shizuka Morino, Shuji Aonuma, Takahide Kimura and Naoki Komatsu

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800944

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      Nanodiamond (ND) particles as small as 4 nm are separated from powdered ND prepared by a static high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) method using ultracentrifugation. The size of the isolated ND is tunable, ranging from 4 to 25 nm, by the selection of appropriate duration and acceleration of the centrifugation. The availability of various sizes of ND particles enables full and precise investigation of their size effects.

    12. Nanonetworks

      Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Cyclic Dye Arrays into Two-Dimensional Honeycomb Nanonetworks (pages 2158–2161)

      Vladimir Stepanenko and Frank Würthner

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Higher-order organization of perylene bisimide-based trimeric metallocycles, which are constructed by metal-ion-directed self-assembly of the respective ditopic terpyridyl ligands, affords domains of two-dimensional honeycomb-structured nanonetworks (see image) reminiscent of the structural organization of dyes in purple bacterial photosynthetic membrane.

    13. Self-assembled monolayers

      Application of Block-Copolymer Supramolecular Assembly for the Fabrication of Complex TiO2 Nanostructures (pages 2162–2165)

      Sung Ho Kim, Oun-Ho Park, Fredrik Nederberg, Teya Topuria, Lesile E. Krupp, Ho-Cheol Kim, Robert M. Waymouth and James L. Hedrick

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801115

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      Porous micellar TiO2 nanostructures are prepared from self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers with oligomeric titanium precursor (see image). This study also shows a strategy to expand the scope of possible TiO2-nanostructure morphologies thorugh control of the stereochemistry of block copolymers or selectivity of solvent. This simple scheme for nanoporous TiO2 can bring new applications with improved performance from in areas such as energy and the environment.

    14. Carbon nanotubes

      Enhanced Environmental Mobility of Carbon Nanotubes in the Presence of Humic Acid and Their Removal from Aqueous Solution (pages 2166–2170)

      Peng Wang, Qihui Shi, Hongjun Liang, David W. Steuerman, Galen D. Stucky and Arturo A. Keller

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800753

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      HA-coated CNTs are very stable in aqueous solution and are able to transport through porous media to a significant extent, indicating high environmental mobility. Use of magnetic metaloxide nanoparticles as affinity probes provides a permanent and efficient removal strategy for HA-coated CNTs from aqueous media (see image).

    15. Nanogels

      Biocompatible Hybrid Nanogels (pages 2171–2175)

      Andrij Pich, Fenbao Zhang, Lei Shen, Sebastian Berger, Olga Ornatsky, Vladimir Baranov and Mitchell A. Winnik

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801159

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      Gels for cells: Hybrid nanogels (see image) that are easily taken up by living cells are prepared with colloidal and temperature-sensitive properties. Integration of reactive nanoparticles (NPs) into the colloidal network during polymerization reduces the colloid dimensions and creates a core–shell structure that isolates the NPs from the surrounding environment.

    16. Gold nanoprisms

      DNA-Gold Triangular Nanoprism Conjugates (pages 2176–2180)

      Jill E. Millstone, Dimitra G. Georganopoulou, Xiaoyang Xu, Wei Wei, Shuyou Li and Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800931

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      DNA-conjugated triangular gold nanoprisms are synthesized and characterized to determine the factors that allow adsorbtion of alkylthiol-modified oligonucleotides on different facets of an anisotropic gold nanoparticle (see image). Face-selective DNA-ligand adsorption processes are time-dependent and can be exploited to selectively immobilize DNA on the different edges and faces of the particle.

    17. Nanojunctions

      Reversibly Compressible and Stretchable “Springlike” Polymeric Nanojunctions Between Metal Nanoparticles (pages 2181–2186)

      Kabeer Jasuja, Arthur Thompson and Vikas Berry

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800788

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      Spring-loaded junctions: An electromechanical device is fabricated by incorporating crosslinked polymer molecules between gold nanoparticles in a two-dimensional array. After compression or stretching induced by a high electric field (see picture) or a centrifugal field, respectively, the junctions exert force on the nanoparticles to move them back to their original position, similar to a windup toy.

    18. Silicon nanowires

      In Situ Laser Synthesis of Si Nanowires in the Dynamic TEM (pages 2187–2190)

      Mitra L. Taheri, Bryan W. Reed, Thomas B. LaGrange and Nigel D. Browning

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800588

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      The dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ nanowire (NW) synthesis and characterization. Initial results show crystalline Si NW production by a root-based growth mechanism using a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method inside the microscope column (see image). The potential of the DTEM to characterize the evolution of nanostructures by PLA methods is demonstrated.

    19. Gold nanoparticles

      pH-Induced Reversible Expansion/Contraction of Gold Nanoparticle Aggregates (pages 2191–2194)

      Yi Chen and Chengde Mao

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800569

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      The formation and dissociation of DNA triplexes is found to be programmable through changing the pH value of the solution. This provides a mechanism to reversibly control interparticle spacing and phonon resonance in gold nanoparticle aggregates, and could have applications in pH sensors.

    20. Carbon nanotubes

      In Situ Tailoring and Manipulation of Carbon Nanotubes (pages 2195–2198)

      Yuan-Chih Chang, Yuan-Hong Liaw, Yang-Shan Huang, Tung Hsu, Chia-Seng Chang and Tien-Tzou Tsong

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800563

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      Nano-manipulation: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes are manipulated in situ using an ultrahigh vacuum transmission electron microscopy/scanning tunneling microscopy method. This method allows for the “peeling” of internal layers of the nanotube, producing low-mass, high-diameter nanotubes, suitable for application as nanoparticle probes or as nanobalances. The precision of the technique makes it possible to reinsert the peeling layers, forming a cylinder/piston-type system (see image).

    21. Photonic crystals

      Enhanced Fluorescence on a Photonic Crystal Surface Incorporating Nanorod Structures (pages 2199–2203)

      Wei Zhang, Nikhil Ganesh, Patrick C. Mathias and Brian T. Cunningham

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800367

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      The emission intensity of is fluorescent dye molecules is increased by over two orders of magnitude through the combined effects of enhanced near fields produced by a 1D photonic crystal slab and enhanced surface area provided by a nanorod-structured TiO2 film (see image).

    22. Bioprobes

      Gold Nanorod Probes for the Detection of Multiple Pathogens (pages 2204–2208)

      Chungang Wang and Joseph Irudayaraj

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800309

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      Multiple pathogenic detection: A simple, sensitive, and inexpensive multiplex pathogen detection scheme, based on novel gold nanorod bioprobes, is developed to detect <102 cfu mL−1 of pathogens. This method sets the stage for the first demonstration of LSPR sensors using gold nanorods with different aspect ratios to detect multiple pathogens, specifically and sensitively.

    23. Semiconducting nanotubes

      Carbon Nanotubes with an Extended Line Defect (pages 2209–2213)

      Mousumi Upadhyay Kahaly, Satinder P. Singh and Umesh V. Waghmare

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200701039

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      Using concepts of defects in graphene lattices (see image) a new class of semiconducting carbon nanotubes is predicted, with an unusual one-dimensional electronic structure. These CNTs are of comparable stability to known carbon nanostructures, have similar mechanical properties, and may be useful in applications based on a combination of electronic transport properties.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. Nanowires

      Integration of Thin-Film-Fracture-Based Nanowires into Microchip Fabrication (pages 2214–2221)

      Seid Jebril, Mady Elbahri, Getachew Titazu, Kittitat Subannajui, Samia Essa, Florentina Niebelschütz, Claus-Christian Röhlig, Volker Cimalla, Oliver Ambacher, Bernd Schmidt, Debdulal Kabiraj, Devesh Avasti and Rainer Adelung

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800228

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      Integrated nanowires: A process for one-step device fabrication using the integration of nanowires (NWs) into silicon microchips (see image) is presented. A fracture approach enables the reproducible fabrication of NWs at desired positions between microcontact lines. The first measurements of the electrical properties of these devices suggest that they may be suitable for application in gas-sensing devices.

    2. Nanoparticle self-assembly

      Real-Time Tracking of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticle Self-Assembly (pages 2222–2228)

      P. Siffalovic, E. Majkova, L. Chitu, M. Jergel, S. Luby, I. Capek, A. Satka, A. Timmann and S. V. Roth

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800353

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      Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (see image) and time-resolved reflectivity are employed for in situ tracking of reciprocal space. A focused synchrotron beam and an X-ray camera, with an exposure time of 25 ms, and sample oscillations make it possible to relate the dynamic reciprocal and direct space features and to localize the nanoparticle self-assembly.

    3. Charge transport

      Charge Transport Through a Cardan-Joint Molecule (pages 2229–2235)

      Mario Ruben, Aitor Landa, Emanuel Lörtscher, Heike Riel, Marcel Mayor, Helmar Görls, Heiko B. Weber, Andreas Arnold and Ferdinand Evers

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800390

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      Single-molecule electrical transport through a cardan-joint-type molecule of the RuII-polypyridyl type is investigated. The results and the simulations show that the cardan-joint structural element of the [RuII(L)2]2+ molecule controls the magnitude of the current, but leaves the positions of steps in the IV curve invariant.

    4. Diamond nanoparticles

      Detection of Single Photoluminescent Diamond Nanoparticles in Cells and Study of the Internalization Pathway (pages 2236–2239)

      Orestis Faklaris, Damien Garrot, Vandana Joshi, Frédéric Druon, Jean-Paul Boudou, Thierry Sauvage, Patrick Georges, Patrick A. Curmi and François Treussart

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800655

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      Diamond nanoparticles are promising photoluminescent probes for tracking intracellular processes, due to embedded, perfectly photostable color centers. The spontaneous internalization process of such nanoparticles (diameter 25 nm) in HeLa cancer cells is investigated by confocal microscopy and time-resolved techniques. The preliminary conclusion is that nanodiamonds are not trapped in endosomes (low colocalisation fraction, marked by yellow arrow on the figure).

    5. Nanoparticle grafting

      Magnetic Imaging of Cyanide-Bridged Co-ordination Nanoparticles Grafted on FIB-Patterned Si Substrates (pages 2240–2246)

      Alberto Ghirri, Andrea Candini, Marco Evangelisti, Gian Carlo Gazzadi, Florence Volatron, Benoit Fleury, Laure Catala, Christophe David, Talal Mallah and Marco Affronte

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800897

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      Cyanide-bridged co-ordination nanoparticles are used to decorate selected portions of Si surfaces, which have been prefunctionalized with a suitable organic ligand and subsequently patterned by low-dose focused ion beam lithography (see picture). By means of a scanning Hall-probe microscope (SHPM) an in-depth investigation of the magnetic response of the grafted nanoparticles to the applied magnetic field and at different temperatures is presented.

    6. Magnetic-metal nanorods

      Spontaneous Formation of Vertical Magnetic-Metal-Nanorod Arrays During Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition (pages 2247–2254)

      Han-Bo-Ram Lee, Gil Ho Gu, Jong Yeog Son, Chan Gyung Park and Hyungjun Kim

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801074

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      Nanorods grow up: Co and Ni nanorods (NRs) are fabricated without catalyst or template by the spontaneous formation of NRs during plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD; see picture). Pure metal NRs 9–10 nm in diameter are synthesized on SiO2 and Si substrates by using metal–organic precursors and an NH3 plasma mixed with SiH4 as reactant.

    7. Carbon nanotubes

      Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotube Networks on Large-Area Glass Substrate by the Dip-Coating Method (pages 2255–2261)

      Eui Yun Jang, Tae June Kang, Hyeoung Wook Im, Dae Weon Kim and Yong Hyup Kim

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800600

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      Highly uniform and large-area single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT) networks are realized on glass substrate by the dip-coating method. In the repetitive dip-coating process, the changes in polarity and hydration properties of the substrate affect the morphology of the SWNT networks and result in their nonlinear growth.

    8. Polyarene-Functionalized Fullerenes in Carbon Nanotubes: Towards Controlled Geometry of Molecular Chains (pages 2262–2270)

      Thomas W. Chamberlain, Rudolf Pfeiffer, Herwig Peterlik, Hans Kuzmany, Francesco Zerbetto, Manuel Melle-Franco, Luke Staddon, Neil R. Champness, G. Andrew D. Briggs and Andrei N. Khlobystov

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800552

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      Fullerene molecules functionalized with aromatic side groups are inserted in carbon nanotubes. The physical size of the functional groups affects separations between fullerene cages. Different non-covalent intermolecular interactions take place inside carbon nanotubes depending on the nanotube diameter and the orientation of encapsulated molecules (See image).

    9. Cluster deposition

      Selective Electroless Deposition of Metal Clusters on Solid-Supported Bacteriorhodopsin: Applications to Orientation Labeling and Electrical Contacts (pages 2271–2278)

      Izhar Ron, Noga Friedman, David Cahen and Mordechai Sheves

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800524

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      Selective electroless metal deposition on sub-monolayers of Bacteriorhodopsin (see image) opens a path for tackling two main problems in interfacing biological molecules with inorganic surfaces: the ability to monitor the orientation of the protein and making an efficient and compatible electrical contact that enhances the signal from the coupled protein.

    10. Nanotube dichroism

      Polarization Dependence of the C 1s X-ray Absorption Spectra of Individual Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 2279–2285)

      Ebrahim Najafi, Daniel Hernández Cruz, Martin Obst, Adam P. Hitchcock, Bastien Douhard, Jean-Jacques Pireaux and Alexandre Felten

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800439

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      Mapping nanotube defects: X-ray linear dichroism of individual carbon nanotubes is spatially mapped for the first time. The figure displays the ratio of two C 1s[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]π* images of a multi-walled nanotube with the indicated E-vector orientations (purple—vertical (90°), yellow—tilted (+45°)). The dichroic signal provides useful feedback on the distribution of sp2 defects along an individual carbon-nanotube structure.

    11. Nanoparticle arrays

      A Hierarchically Ordered TiO2 Hemispherical Particle Array with Hexagonal-Non-Close-Packed Tops: Synthesis and Stable Superhydrophilicity Without UV Irradiation (pages 2286–2291)

      Yue Li, Takeshi Sasaki, Yoshiki Shimizu and Naoto Koshizaki

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800428

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      A hierarchically ordered TiO2 hemispherical particle array with hexagonal-non-close-packed (hncp) tops (see image) is prepared using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) with a polystyrene colloidal monolayer as a template. It exhibits stable superhydrophilicity with a water contact angle of 0° without further UV irradiation. It could be used in self-cleaning surfaces and microfluidic devices.

    12. Plasmonics

      Mie and Bragg Plasmons in Subwavelength Silver Semi-Shells (pages 2292–2299)

      Abbas I. Maaroof, Michael B. Cortie, Nadine Harris and Lech Wieczorek

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800203

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      Ordered arrays of nanoscale Ag semi-shells on polystyrene nanoparticle templates have rich and complex optical characteristics in the visible part of the spectrum, the origin of which has hitherto been somewhat uncertain. Here, it is demonstrated that the most prominent absorption phenomenon is due to rotation of incident light into the plane of the array, with the subsequent excitation of an out-of-plane dipole plasmon resonance.

  7. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      A New Bio-Inspired Route to Metal-Nanoparticle-Based Heterogeneous Catalysts

      D. P. Debecker, C. Faure, M.-E. Meyre, A. Derré and E. M. Gaigneaux

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890063

      This article corrects:

      A New Bio-Inspired Route to Metal-Nanoparticle-Based Heterogeneous Catalysts

      Vol. 4, Issue 10, 1806–1812, Article first published online: 10 OCT 2008

  8. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
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      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890062

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