Small

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 2

February 1, 2008

Volume 4, Issue 2

Pages 165–299

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Kinetically Controlled, Shape-Directed Assembly of Nanorods (Small 2/2008) (page 165)

      Jacob W. Ciszek, Ling Huang, Yuhuang Wang and Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows various superstructures generated using kinetically controlled assembly. These scanning electron microscopy images are overlaid on an image of the building blocks—two part gold/polypyrrole nanorods—that constitute each structure. Templating orients and spaces the nanorods such that they form discrete structures. Photolithography preselects rods to assemble into a given structure, thereby dictating the resulting shape. This kinetic control allows for designer assemblies that incorporate more than 106 building blocks. For more information, please read the Communication by C. Mirkin et al., beginning on page 206.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Small 2/2008 (pages 167–172)

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890004

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
  4. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Organic Molecular Nanotechnology (pages 176–181)

      Manuela Schiek, Frank Balzer, Katharina Al-Shamery, Jonathan R. Brewer, Arne Lützen and Horst-Günter Rubahn

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700483

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic molecular nanotechnology allows for the generation of mutually aligned, morphologically well-defined light-emitting organic nanofibers from functionalized molecules. Electrically contacted, individual nanofibers are stamped onto a banknote to form a blue-light-emitting triangle (see image). Extraordinary flexibility in the design of their optoelectronic properties makes these nanofibers key components in next-generation nanophotonic devices.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Optical Lithography with Printed Metal Mask and a Simple Superhydrophobic Surface (pages 182–185)

      Tae-il Kim, Chang hoon Baek, Kahp Y. Suh, Soon-min Seo and Hong H. Lee

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700882

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanolithographic optical patterning technique is presented. A metal pattern on a mold is transferred onto a photoresist on a substrate, then the resist with the printed metal mask is flood illuminated. The light passes through only the resist lenses that are formed in the transfer process. Focusing by these lenses results in a significant reduction in the feature size.

    2. High-Contrast Paramagnetic Fluorescent Mesoporous Silica Nanorods as a Multifunctional Cell-Imaging Probe (pages 186–191)

      Chih-Pin Tsai, Yann Hung, Yi-Hsin Chou, Dong-Ming Huang, Jong-Kai Hsiao, Chen Chang, Yao-Chang Chen and Chung-Yuan Mou

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700457

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A real contrast: Multifunctional fluorescent and paramagnetic mesoporous silica nanorods can be used to label both phagocytic and nonphagocytotic cells. The cells can be detected simultaneously by a fluorescence technique and the T1- or T2-weighted modes of magnetic resonance imaging (see picture).

    3. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Photothermally Controlled Drug Delivery and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Enhancement (pages 192–196)

      Huiyul Park, Jaemoon Yang, Sungbaek Seo, Kyujung Kim, Jinsuk Suh, Donghyun Kim, Seungjoo Haam and Kyung-Hwa Yoo

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700807

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Core–multishell nanoparticles: Near-IR-resonant rhodamine-encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)–Mn/Au half-shell nanoparticles (NPs; see figure) are developed by depositing metal multilayers on PLGA NPs. These NPs can be used for photothermally controlled drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Upon NIR irradiation, the release rate of rhodamine from the PLGA NPs is about twice as great as that without NIR irradiation, indicating photothermally controlled drug delivery possibilities.

    4. Detection and Titer Estimation of Escherichia coli Using Aptamer-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors (pages 197–201)

      Hye-Mi So, Dong-Won Park, Eun-Kyoung Jeon, Yo-Han Kim, Beom Soo Kim, Chong-Kyo Lee, Sun Young Choi, Sung Chun Kim, Hyunju Chang and Jeong-O Lee

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700664

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bug detectors: Multiple arrays of aptamer-functionalized single-walled carbon-nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs) can be combined with the most probable number method as a simple, fast screening platform for the detection of microorganisms. The picture indicates the binding events of Escherichia coli on such SWNT-FET arrays, which showed a conductance decrease of more than 50% after binding.

    5. Plasmonic Au/Co/Au Nanosandwiches with Enhanced Magneto-optical Activity (pages 202–205)

      Juan B. González-Díaz, Antonio García-Martín, José M. García-Martín, Alfonso Cebollada, Gaspar Armelles, Borja Sepúlveda, Yury Alaverdyan and Mikael Käll

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700594

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanostructure composed of Au/Co/Au nanodisks is fabricated. The behaviour of this system is completely different to that of a continuous Au/Co/Au layer. There is a relative enhancement of the Kerr rotation and ellipticity, as well as a strong dependence on the particle size. The origin of these properties is the plasmonlike structure that is supported by the nanosandwiches.

    6. Kinetically Controlled, Shape-Directed Assembly of Nanorods (pages 206–210)

      Jacob W. Ciszek, Ling Huang, Yuhuang Wang and Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700840

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Building materials: Identical building blocks (two-segment polypyrrole/gold nanorods) can be assembled into different 3D superstructures through kinetic control of the assembly process (see picture). The number and location of the rods are controlled by photolithography, and their orientation and spacing are controlled via an anodic aluminum oxide template.

    7. A One-Step Route to a Perfectly Ordered Wafer-Scale Microbowl Array for Size-Dependent Superhydrophobicity (pages 211–216)

      Xing-Jiu Huang, Joo-Hyung Lee, Jong-Won Lee, Jun-Bo Yoon and Yang-Kyu Choi

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700881

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An easy, inexpensive, high-throughput, and scalable one-step microlithography technique to construct a superhydrophobic surface is introduced. The resulting surface can be very precisely designed to have specific dimensions. The dependence of the hydrophobic behavior on the surface dimensions is analytically investigated and modeled.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. Iridium-Complex-Functionalized Fe3O4/SiO2 Core/Shell Nanoparticles: A Facile Three-in-One System in Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Luminescence Imaging, and Photodynamic Therapy (pages 218–224)

      Chih-Wei Lai, Yu-Hsiu Wang, Cheng-Hsuan Lai, Meng-Ju Yang, Chun-Yen Chen, Pi-Tai Chou, Chi-Shun Chan, Yun Chi, Yu-Chun Chen and Jong-Kai Hsiao

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700283

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Core content: Highly uniform Fe3O4/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles are functionalized by phosphorescent iridium complexes (see picture). The magnetic core provides the capability for magnetic resonance imaging. Enhancement of the spin–orbit coupling in the iridium complex is well suited for phosphorescent labeling, while generation of singlet oxygen induces apoptosis.

    2. Linking Proteins with Anionic Nanoparticles via Protamine: Ultrasmall Protein-Coupled Probes for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Apoptosis (pages 225–230)

      Eyk Schellenberger, Jörg Schnorr, Chris Reutelingsperger, Liset Ungethüm, Wolfdietrich Meyer, Matthias Taupitz and Bernd Hamm

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700847

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Peptide–protein linkages: Protamine (blue area of model in figure) is a natural peptide that facilitates coupling of annexin A5 proteins (green) to ultrasmall, electrostatically stabilized anionic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (gray) to yield protein-coupled probes for molecular MRI. Phantom experiments show that these particles specifically recognize apoptotic cells.

    3. Direct Coprecipitation Route to Monodisperse Dual-Functionalized Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanocrystals Without Size Selection (pages 231–239)

      Zhen Li, Bien Tan, Mathieu Allix, Andrew I. Cooper and Matthew J. Rosseinsky

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700575

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Monodisperse superparamagnetic dual-functionalized Fe3O4 nanocrystals (see figure) are prepared without size selection by a coprecipitation route in the presence of a trithiol-terminated poly(methacrylic acid), PMAA-PTTM. The dual-functionalized surfaces confer both water solubility and redispersability, and permit the synthesis of fluorescent magnetic nanocrystals via simple conjugation reactions.

    4. Carbon Nanotubes with High Bone-Tissue Compatibility and Bone-Formation Acceleration Effects (pages 240–246)

      Yuki Usui, Kaoru Aoki, Nobuyo Narita, Narumichi Murakami, Isao Nakamura, Koichi Nakamura, Norio Ishigaki, Hiroshi Yamazaki, Hiroshi Horiuchi, Hiroyuki Kato, Seiichi Taruta, Yoong Ahm Kim, Morinobu Endo and Naoto Saito

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700670

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotubes instead of crutches! It is found that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) adjoining bone induce little local inflammatory reaction, show high bone-tissue compatibility, permit bone repair, become integrated into new bone (see figure), and accelerate bone formation stimulated by the recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. This study provides an initial basis for use of CNTs in biomaterials placed adjacent to bone, including the promotion of bone regeneration.

    5. Discovery of New Hexagonal Supramolecular Nanostructures Formed by Squalenoylation of an Anticancer Nucleoside Analogue (pages 247–253)

      Patrick Couvreur, L. Harivardhan Reddy, Stéphanie Mangenot, Jacques H. Poupaert, Didier Desmaële, Sinda Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Barbara Pili, Claudie Bourgaux, H. Amenitsch and Michel Ollivon

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700731

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Squalenoylation for more potent anticancer treatment: Covalent coupling of squalene to the anticancer agent gemcitabine results in a nanometer-scale medicinal material. These nanoassemblies display hexagonal supramolecular organization, with an internal structure made of reticular planes surrounded by an external shell (see figure). The squalenoyl gemcitabine nanoassemblies exhibit impressively greater anticancer activity against a solid subcutaneously grafted tumour in mice compared with its parent drug.

    6. Signatures of Clustering in Superparamagnetic Colloidal Nanocomposites of an Inorganic and Hybrid Nature (pages 254–261)

      Aldo F. Rebolledo, Antonio B. Fuertes, Teresita Gonzalez-Carreño, Marta Sevilla, Teresa Valdes-Solis and Pedro Tartaj

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700515

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An attractive choice: The individual and co-operative properties of inorganic and hybrid (carbon, silica, polymers) superparamagnetic colloidal nanocomposites that satisfy all the requirements of magnetic carriers in the bioscience and/or catalysis fields are studied. The selection of suitable synthetic routes (aerosol and nanocasting) allows the preparation of nanometer-sized iron oxide spinels with different matrix characteristics (see picture).

    7. An Adenoviral Platform for Selective Self-Assembly and Targeted Delivery of Nanoparticles (pages 262–269)

      Vaibhav Saini, Dmitri V. Martyshkin, Sergei B. Mirov, Alex Perez, Guy Perkins, Mark H. Ellisman, Victoria D. Towner, Hongju Wu, Larisa Pereboeva, Anton Borovjagin, David T. Curiel and Maaike Everts

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700403

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On target: Selective assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the surface of adenoviral (Ad) vectors allows a combination of gene therapy and nanotechnology for the treatment of diseases (see picture; Ni-NTA=nickel nitrilotriacetic acid). The specific coupling of NPs does not impede the ability of the virus to bind to target cells and deliver its transgene.

    8. Magnetic Force Microscopy of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles (pages 270–278)

      Sharon Schreiber, Mayur Savla, Denis V. Pelekhov, Daniel F. Iscru, Camelia Selcu, P. Chris Hammel and Gunjan Agarwal

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Detecting nanomagnets: By using external magnetic fields and magnetic atomic force microscopy (MFM) tips, it is possible to identify the dipolar nature of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in ambient air (see figure). These approaches could help localize magnetic deposits in diseased tissues.

    9. Exploiting Enzymatic (Reversed) Hydrolysis in Directed Self-Assembly of Peptide Nanostructures (pages 279–287)

      Apurba K. Das, Richard Collins and Rein V. Ulijn

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700889

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanostructures with specific morphology and dimensions are fabricated. The route to self-assembly and the chemical nature of the building blocks can both influence the nanostructures that form. Self-assembly is driven by hydrogen-bonding interactions forming β-sheet structures combined with π–π interactions of aromatic fluorenyl groups, which are confirmed by FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively.

    10. Nanoscale Detection of Ionizing Radiation Damage to DNA by Atomic Force Microscopy (pages 288–294)

      Changhong Ke, Yong Jiang, Piotr A. Mieczkowski, Garrett G. Muramoto, John P. Chute and Piotr E. Marszalek

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700527

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Damage to DNA by ionizing radiation on a single-molecule level is detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Combining a supercoiled plasmid relaxation assay with AFM imaging leads to direct and quantitative detection of gamma-ray-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA. Three conformations (supercoiled (S); circular (C), and linear (L)) of irradiated pNEBR-R1 plasmids are observed on the APS-mica surface (see figure).

  7. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Concept
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Small 3/2008 (page 299)

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200890005

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION