Small

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 11

June 5, 2009

Volume 5, Issue 11

Pages 1231–1350

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Surface patterning: Small 11/2009

      Ruth Diez-Ahedo, Davide Normanno, Olga Esteban, Gert-Jan Bakker, Carl G. Figdor, Alessandra Cambi and Maria F. Garcia-Parajo

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990052

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover illustration shows the use of ligand-patterned surfaces to study the spatio-temporal organization of integrins mediating cell adhesion on cells of the immune system. Micro-contact printing is used to fabricate large chemically confined areas containing the ligand ICAM-1. The dynamic organization of the integrin LFA-1 in living cells is monitored at the single-molecule level using total reflection microscopy. LFA-1 binding to its ligand ICAM-1 promotes the formation of nano- and microclustering on the cell surface that remains largely immobile. In contrast, in the absence of the ligand (free areas in the cover image), LFA-1 diffuses randomly without interaction with the cytoskeleton. This simple experimental approach allows the study of the intricate coupling between spatial organization, lateral diffusion, and conformational states of receptors orchestrating cell adhesion. For more information, please read the Communication “Dynamic Re-organization of Individual Adhesion Nanoclusters in Living Cells by Ligand-Patterned Surfaces” by M. F. Garcia-Parajo et al., beginning on page 1258.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanocrystalline materials: Small 11/2009

      Ram Sai Yelamanchili, Yan Lu, Thomas Lunkenbein, Nobuyoshi Miyajima, Li-Tang Yan, Matthias Ballauff and Josef Breu

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a hierarchical route towards structuring nanocrystalline rutile on the mesoscale. Using spherical polyelectrolyte brushes as a template and pre-synthesized electrostatically stabilized rutile nanocrystals, which carry a positive surface charge, as inorganic precursors, a crystalline polymer–rutile composite is formed. The template may be removed completely without loss of the mesostructure by a two-step calcination treatment first in argon, followed by a second treatment in air. Hence, macroporous balls with mesoporous walls consisting of rutile nanocrystals are obtained. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Shaping Colloidal Rutile into Thermally Stable and Porous Mesoscopic Titania Balls” by J. Breu et al., beginning on page 1326.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Polymersomes: Small 11/2009 (pages 1231–1236)

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990054

  4. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanochemistry

      You have free access to this content
      Nanochemistry: What Is Next? (pages 1240–1244)

      Geoffrey A. Ozin and Ludovico Cademartiri

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900113

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Where do we go from here? The authors reflect on the development and current state of maturity of nanochemistry as a field of science. Has the area delivered on its scientific and technical promises or was it another over-hyped fad? It is argued that not only has nanochemistry broken down boundaries between traditional scientific schools, but could still be instrumental in providing solutions to future scientific challenges.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanosoldering

      Joining and Interconnect Formation of Nanowires and Carbon Nanotubes for Nanoelectronics and Nanosystems (pages 1246–1257)

      Qingzhou Cui, Fan Gao, Subhadeep Mukherjee and Zhiyong Gu

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801551

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Joining and interconnect formation of nanocomponents is critical for the assembly and integration of nanoelectronics and nanosystems. Recent progress on joining and interconnect formation of nanowires and carbon nanotubes (see image) is reviewed, and the nanosoldering technique is proposed as an effective and scalable way to construct complex and/or hybrid nanoelectronics and nanosystems.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Surface patterning

      Dynamic Re-organization of Individual Adhesion Nanoclusters in Living Cells by Ligand-Patterned Surfaces (pages 1258–1263)

      Ruth Diez-Ahedo, Davide Normanno, Olga Esteban, Gert-Jan Bakker, Carl G. Figdor, Alessandra Cambi and Maria F. Garcia-Parajo

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801699

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ligand-patterned surfaces alter the spatio-temporal organization of specific receptors on the cell membrane. Chemically confined surfaces are fabricated using microcontact patterning. The dynamic re-organization of the integrin LFA-1 in living cells is monitored at the single-molecule level using total internal reflection fluorescence. The image on the left shows individual LFA-1 nanoclusters on a single cell being recruited to ligand-rich areas of the pattern.

    2. Alginate hollow fibers

      Synthesis of Cell-Laden Alginate Hollow Fibers Using Microfluidic Chips and Microvascularized Tissue-Engineering Applications (pages 1264–1268)

      Kwang Ho Lee, Su Jung Shin, Yongdoo Park and Sang-Hoon Lee

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801667

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alginate-only, cell-laden, and protein-immobilized hollow fibers are produced (see image). Cells remain alive within the hollow fibers due to the nontoxic fabrication process. Vascular tissue can be emulated by embedding endothelial cells into the alginate hollow fibers and then embedding these cell-laden fibers into smooth-muscle-cell-laden AGF hydrogels.

    3. Optical tweezers

      Optical Tweezers Study of Topoisomerase Inhibition (pages 1269–1272)

      Daniel Pla, Andy Sischka, Fernando Albericio, Mercedes Álvarez, Xavier Fernàndez-Busquets and Dario Anselmetti

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801322

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Optical tweezers force-stretching of highly nicked dsDNA, as indicated by the large hysteresis area (black and red curves). Topoisomerase activity is evidenced by a higher level plateau and a complete vanishing of the overstretching hysteresis (green curve), indicating total repair of the DNA nicks. The arrow indicates a drop in the stretching curve resulting from topoisomerase cleavage during the cycle.

    4. Gold nanoparticles

      Electrophysiological Study of Single Gold Nanoparticle/α-Hemolysin Complex Formation: A Nanotool to Slow Down ssDNA Through the α-Hemolysin Nanopore (pages 1273–1278)

      Yann Astier, Oktay Uzun and Francesco Stellacci

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801779

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles can be captured in the α-hemolysin nanopore (see image). Single-nanopore ion conductance studies of the nanoparticle/nanopore complex are described. The effect of the nanoparticle size, charge, and surface coating on ssDNA threading speed through the nanopore/nanoparticle complex is discussed.

    5. Hybrid materials

      Temperature Compensation for Hybrid Devices: Kinesin's Km is Temperature Independent (pages 1279–1282)

      Robert Tucker, Ajoy K. Saha, Parag Katira, Marlene Bachand, George D. Bachand and Henry Hess

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801510

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A biomimetic strategy to stabilize the activity of kinesin motors – a key component of molecular shuttles – against temperature changes is investigated but proves unsuccessful for this enzyme because the Km of Drosophila kinesin-1 and Thermomyces kinesin-3 is independent of temperature in the range of 19–34 °C (see image).

    6. SERS platforms

      Robust Au–PEG/PS Microbeads as Optically Stable Platforms for SERS (pages 1283–1286)

      Abdiaziz A. Farah, Juan P. Bravo-Vasquez, Ramon A. Alvarez-Puebla, Jae-Young Cho and Hicham Fenniri

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801398

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A SERS ultradetection platform assembled from a commercially available PEG/PS graft copolymer and gold ions (see image) is shown to be optically and chemically stable, highly reproducible, and scalable. The tremendous simplicity of fabrication and low cost could make these materials a valuable tool for many potential users with no prior knowledge or experience in SERS-active nanocomposite materials.

    7. Nanotechnology

      Ionic Transport Through Single Solid-State Nanopores Controlled with Thermally Nanoactuated Macromolecular Gates (pages 1287–1291)

      Basit Yameen, Mubarak Ali, Reinhard Neumann, Wolfgang Ensinger, Wolfgang Knoll and Omar Azzaroni

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801318

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single solid-state nanopores modified with poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) brushes display thermally controlled gating properties. Below the lower critical solubility temperature (LCST) NIPAM brushes are swollen and, consequently, dramatically reduce the effective cross section of the nanopores (see image). Conversely, above the LCST the brushes dehydrate and suffer a transition into a collapsed state, which promotes the widening of the nanopore and enables a substantial flow of ions.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Cancer therapy

      Cancer-Cell Targeting and Photoacoustic Therapy Using Carbon Nanotubes as “Bomb” Agents (pages 1292–1301)

      Bin Kang, Decai Yu, Yaodong Dai, Shuquan Chang, Da Chen and Yitao Ding

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801820

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotube photoacoustic “bomb” agents trigger an explosion in water and generate strong shockwaves under the irradiation of a 1064-nm millisecond pulsed laser (upper image). Based on this large photoacoustic effect, cancer cells are selectively destroyed by the strong shockwave explosion of nanotubes inside cells. The necrotic cells (bottom right) exhibit a cracked morphology and structure that differ from living cells (bottom left).

    2. Quantum dots

      Aqueous-Phase Synthesis of Highly Luminescent CdTe/ZnTe Core/Shell Quantum Dots Optimized for Targeted Bioimaging (pages 1302–1310)

      Wing-Cheung Law, Ken-Tye Yong, Indrajit Roy, Hong Ding, Rui Hu, Weiwei Zhao and Paras N. Prasad

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801555

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A one-pot synthesis approach is used to produce water-dispersible, highly luminescent CdTe/ZnTe core/shell quantum dots (QDs). The structure, optical properties, and cytotoxicity of these QDs are studied (see image). The ZnTe protective shell not only enhances the brightness of the QDs but also improves their stability in a biological environment.

    3. Sensors

      Reversible Size-Tuning of Self-Assembled Silver Nanoparticles in Phospholipid Membranes via Humidity Control (pages 1311–1317)

      Nuri Oh, Jung Hoon Kim, Sungho Jin and Chong Seung Yoon

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801536

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A monolayer of 5-nm Ag nanoparticles embedded in a liquid-crystalline lipid membrane undergoes a reversible morphological change during hydration and dehydration of the lipid membrane (see image). High mobility of the encapsulating lipid molecules, chemically bound to the Ag atoms, induces redistribution of metal to produce significant and optically detectable changes in nanoparticle morphology during the lipid phase transition.

    4. DNA nanoconjugates

      Labeling TiO2 Nanoparticles with Dyes for Optical Fluorescence Microscopy and Determination of TiO2–DNA Nanoconjugate Stability (pages 1318–1325)

      Kenneth T. Thurn, Tatjana Paunesku, Aiguo Wu, Eric M. B. Brown, Barry Lai, Stefan Vogt, Jörg Maser, Mohammed Aslam, Vinayak Dravid, Raymond Bergan and Gayle E. Woloschak

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801458

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) combined with fluorescent confocal microscopy shows a similar distribution of both components of the TiO2–DNA nanoconjugate (XFM of TiO2 nanoparticle and fluorescence of covalently bound fluorescent DNA oligonucleotide) within the same cell (see image).

    5. Nanocrystalline materials

      Shaping Colloidal Rutile into Thermally Stable and Porous Mesoscopic Titania Balls (pages 1326–1333)

      Ram Sai Yelamanchili, Yan Lu, Thomas Lunkenbein, Nobuyoshi Miyajima, Li-Tang Yan, Matthias Ballauff and Josef Breu

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801298

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The direct synthesis of crystalline polymer–metal oxide composites by structure-directing electrostatically stabilized rutile nanocrystals over spherical polyelectrolyte brush particles is presented (see image). This alternative route is not just limited to zeolite materials and it is expected that this hierarchical route to structure nanoscopic oxides at the mesoscale is generally applicable.

    6. Functionalized nanoparticles

      Surface Functionalization of Single Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 1334–1342)

      Esther Amstad, Stefan Zurcher, Alireza Mashaghi, Joyce Y. Wong, Marcus Textor and Erik Reimhult

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801328

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using quartz crystal microbalance ith dissipation monitoring it is shown that 9 ± 2-nm iron oxide cores individually stabilized with biotin-PEG(3400)-gallol/methoxy-PEG(550)-gallol can be targeted with high binding affinity and excellent specificity toward recombinant VCAM-1 chimera. Highly potent targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents are demonstrated (see image).

    7. Metallic line patterns

      Preparation of Metallic Line Patterns from Functional Block Copolymers (pages 1343–1348)

      Soojin Park, Bokyung Kim, Ali Cirpan and Thomas P. Russell

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801409

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two different strategies are used for the generation of arrays of sub-30-nm continuous metallic nanostructures from functional block copolymers (see picture). Block-copolymer templates are prepared by film reconstruction or by removal of one block of the copolymer. Metallic line patterns are obtained from the templates by electrochemical etching or metal deposition.

  8. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Keywords Index Small 11/2009 (page 1349)

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990055

  9. Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essay
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Authors Index Small 11/2009 (page 1350)

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990056

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION