Small

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 14

July 17, 2009

Volume 5, Issue 14

Pages 1591–1694

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Nanoparticle delivery: Small 14/2009

      Owen Loh, Robert Lam, Mark Chen, Nicolaie Moldovan, Houjin Huang, Dean Ho and Horacio D. Espinosa

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990068

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image depicts two modes of functionalized nanoparticle delivery for single-cell studies using a versatile nanofountain probe (NFP). NFPs are scanning probes with integrated microfluidics, enabling both direct-write nanopatterning and direct/in vitro/injection of functional nanoparticles. The NFP is used to pattern dot arrays of chemotherapy-drug-conjugated nanodiamonds with sub-100-nm resolution on glass substrates for subsequent cell culture and precise drug-dosing studies. The same NFP is also used to inject nanodiamond conjugates directly into live cells for further interrogation. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Nanofountain-Probe-Based High-Resolution Patterning and Single-Cell Injection of Functionalized Nanodiamonds” by D. Ho, H. D. Espinosa, et al., beginning on page 1667.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Jet propulsion: Small 14/2009

      Alexander A. Solovev, Yongfeng Mei, Esteban Bermúdez Ureña, Gaoshan Huang and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image shows strain-engineered microtubes traveling as self-propelled catalytic microjet engines along various trajectories with speeds up to ≈ 2 mm s−1 (approximately 50 body lengths per second). The motion of the microjets is generated by gas bubbles thrust out of one opening of the tube. The trajectories of various geometries can be traced by long microbubble tails. A magnetic layer is integrated into the wall of the microjet engine, which allows easy control over the direction of motion by applying external magnetic fields. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Catalytic Microtubular Jet Engines Self-Propelled by Accumulated Gas Bubbles” by Y. Mei et al., beginning on page 1688.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Contents: Small 14/2009 (pages 1591–1595)

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990070

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. News (pages 1598–1599)

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200901086

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Nanoscale interactions

      Nanoscale Forces and Their Uses in Self-Assembly (pages 1600–1630)

      Kyle J. M. Bishop, Christopher E. Wilmer, Siowling Soh and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900358

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This Review provides a critical examination of the various interparticle forces (van der Waals, electrostatic, magnetic, molecular, and entropic) that can be used in nanoscale self-assembly. The magnitudes and length scales of each force (see image) are discussed, with emphasis on characteristics unique to the nanoscale. Recent experimental systems, in which specific interaction types were used to drive nanoscopic self-assembly, accompany the theoretical discussion.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Nanoimprint lithography

      Fabrication of Polymeric Nanorods Using Bilayer Nanoimprint Lithography (pages 1632–1636)

      Fatih Buyukserin, Mukti Aryal, Jinming Gao and Wenchuang Hu

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801822

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bilayer nanoimprint lithography method is presented for the fabrication of nanorods (see image) with precisely controllable dimensions. The uniqueness of this method stems from the bilayer polymer design and development of low-cost, large-area nanoporous Si molds.

    2. Surface modification

      Functionalized Nanoparticles with Long-Term Stability in Biological Media (pages 1637–1641)

      Chen Fang, Narayan Bhattarai, Conroy Sun and Miqin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801647

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A surface-engineering approach to produce monodisperse nanoparticles functionalized for conjugations of various biomolecules is described. The oleic acid-capped nanoparticles are modified with triethoxysilylpropylsuccinic anhydride followed by reaction with aminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to render the nanoparticles hydrophilic and display amine groups at the free termini of PEG chains (see image).

    3. Nanotube mobility

      “Textured” Network Devices: Overcoming Fundamental Limitations of Nanotube/Nanowire Network-Based Devices (pages 1642–1648)

      Minbaek Lee, Meg Noah, June Park, Maeng-Je Seong, Young-Kyun Kwon and Seunghun Hong

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801500

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Textured network devices are proposed as a solution to the fundamental problems of nanotube/nanowire network-based devices (see image). Significantly, both experiment and simulation show that “textured” network channels have enhanced mobility and conductivity with reduced channel width, which makes this strategy ideal for nanoscale device applications.

    4. Nanodiamonds

      Five-Nanometer Diamond with Luminescent Nitrogen-Vacancy Defect Centers (pages 1649–1653)

      Bradley R. Smith, David W. Inglis, Bjornar Sandnes, James R. Rabeau, Andrei V. Zvyagin, Daniel Gruber, Christopher J. Noble, Robert Vogel, Eiji Ōsawa and Taras Plakhotnik

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801802

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colored diamonds: Despite concerns that photostable luminescent nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers do not exist in 5-nm diamonds, time-resolved luminescence experiments on weakly bound clusters of such diamonds show that NV centers can be embedded (see picture). The efficiency of NV formation scales as the fifth power of the crystal radius.

    5. Block copolymers

      Well-Ordered Thin-Film Nanopore Arrays Formed Using a Block-Copolymer Template (pages 1654–1659)

      Yeon Sik Jung and Caroline A. Ross

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanopores in various metallic thin films are defined using self-assembled templates from a sphere-forming block copolymer (see image). This method is versatile and can be used to form antidot arrays in a variety of metals including Ti, Pt, W, Ta, Co, and Ni, and silica, as well as Ni dot arrays.

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Phospholipid patterns: Small 14/2009

      Antoine Diguet, Maël Le Berre, Yong Chen and Damien Baigl

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The frontispiece shows that by dragging a phospholipid solution on microstructured silicon surfaces, phospholipid molecules are selectively deposited inside the microstructures to obtain regular phospholipid multilayer patterns of controlled thickness over a large scale (≈ cm2). The generated patterns are used for the preparation of giant liposomes of controlled size with a narrow size distribution, and can be of great interest for the development of novel biosensors or cell-screening procedures. The method also promises to be applicable for high-fidelity patterning of various synthetic or biological molecules, such as proteins, drugs, conductive polymers, or antibodies. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Preparation of Phospholipid Multilayer Patterns of Controlled Size and Thickness by Capillary Assembly on a Microstructured Substrate” by D. Baigl et al., beginning on page 1661.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Phospholipid patterns

      Preparation of Phospholipid Multilayer Patterns of Controlled Size and Thickness by Capillary Assembly on a Microstructured Substrate (pages 1661–1666)

      Antoine Diguet, Maël Le Berre, Yong Chen and Damien Baigl

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900368

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By dragging a phospholipid solution on microstructured silicon surfaces, phospholipid molecules are selectively deposited inside the microstructures to yield regular phospholipid multilayer patterns of controlled thickness (from 28 to 100 nm) over a large scale (∼cm2). Electroswelling of phospholipid multilayer patterns leads to the formation of giant liposomes of controlled size and narrow size distributions (see image).

    2. Nanoparticle delivery

      Nanofountain-Probe-Based High-Resolution Patterning and Single-Cell Injection of Functionalized Nanodiamonds (pages 1667–1674)

      Owen Loh, Robert Lam, Mark Chen, Nicolaie Moldovan, Houjin Huang, Dean Ho and Horacio D. Espinosa

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900361

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two modes of functionalized nanoparticle delivery for single-cell studies are demonstrated using a versatile nanofountain probe: direct-write nanopatterning of drug-coated nanoparticles with sub-100-nm resolution, and direct in vitro injection of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles (see image).

    3. Quantum dots

      Thermally Activated Photoluminescence in Lead Selenide Colloidal Quantum Dots (pages 1675–1681)

      Ariel Kigel, Maya Brumer, Georgy I. Maikov, Aldona Sashchiuk and Efrat Lifshitz

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801378

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photoluminescence in PbSe colloidal quantum dots (see image) appears as an abrupt change of the exciton emission strength and its decay time upon increasing the temperature. Acoustic phonon coupling activates a dark exciton at 1.4–7 K, and a dark–bright exciton transition occurs at 100–200 K.

    4. Photoconductivity

      Photoconductivity of Bulk-Film-Based Graphene Sheets (pages 1682–1687)

      Xin Lv, Yi Huang, Zhibo Liu, Jianguo Tian, Yan Wang, Yanfeng Ma, Jiajie Liang, Shipeng Fu, Xiangjian Wan and Yongsheng Chen

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Time-resolved photoconductivity of graphene films is detected (see image). The graphene films are prepared through the reduction of graphene oxide. Under different incident light intensities, external electric fields, photon energies, and preparation methods of the films, photocurrent generation efficiency and decay time of these graphene-based films are compared and discussed.

    5. Jet propulsion

      Catalytic Microtubular Jet Engines Self-Propelled by Accumulated Gas Bubbles (pages 1688–1692)

      Alexander A. Solovev, Yongfeng Mei, Esteban Bermúdez Ureña, Gaoshan Huang and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Strain-engineered microtubes with an inner catalytic surface serve as self-propelled catalytic microjet engines, with speeds of up to ≈2 mm s−1 (approximately 50 body lengths per second), and travel along various trajectories that are well-visualized by long microbubble tails (see image).

  9. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Keywords Index Small 14/2009 (page 1693)

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990072

  10. Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Full Papers
    10. Keywords
    11. Authors
    1. Authors Index Small 14/2009 (page 1694)

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990073

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