Small

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 16

August 17, 2009

Volume 5, Issue 16

Pages 1807–1912

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Near-field nanopatterning: Small 16/2009

      P. Kühler, F. J. García de Abajo, J. Solis, M. Mosbacher, P. Leiderer, C.N. Afonso and J. Siegel

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image illustrates the concept of nanoscale optical patterning by near-field interference. It shows the optical intensity pattern produced upon scattering of a single 800-nm femtosecond laser pulse incident on a ≈5-µm silica sphere supported on a thin chalcogenide film. The complex 2D near-field pattern is imprinted onto the photosensitive film producing optical, electrical, and topographical contrast. Control over the resulting patterns is achieved by playing with the illumination conditions and the size and arrangement of the particles. This work constitutes a proof-of-concept of a new lithography and imaging technique that is directly applicable to a variety of scattering particles of different size, shape, and composition, and that will be an inexpensive and highly versatile method for producing complex, erasable patterns to be used in high-density data storage, nanopatterning, and massive parallel sensing. For more information, please read the Communication “Imprinting the Optical Near Field of Microstructures with Nanometer Resolution” by J. Siegel et al., beginning on page 1825.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Bioassays: Small 16/2009

      Amanda Carroll-Portillo, Marlene Bachand, Adrienne C. Greene and George D. Bachand

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture illustrates the transport of quantum dot (QD) “sandwiches” along surface-bound microtubule filaments by kinesin biomolecular motors. “Nanoharvesters” are assembled through the co-localization of kinesin motors and antibodies on red-emitting QDs, and form a double-antibody sandwich with antibody-coated green QDs when the antigen is present. For more information, please read the Communication “In vitro Capture, Transport, and Detection of Protein Analytes Using Kinesin-Based Nanoharvesters” by G. D. Bachand et al., beginning on page 1835.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Contents: Small 16/2009 (pages 1807–1812)

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990082

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanocomposites

      Deformation Measurements on Thin Clay Tactoids (pages 1816–1820)

      Daniel A. Kunz, Eva Max, Richard Weinkamer, Thomas Lunkenbein, Josef Breu and Andreas Fery

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801710

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Applying a synthetic fluorohectorite that shows giant lateral extensions, a microscopic bending test is performed using atomic force microscopy (see image). Due to the significantly weaker bonding strength between neighboring lamellae along the stacking direction, the C33 elastic constant of synthetic Na0.5-fluorohectorite is found to be lower than those reported for micas, which falls within the expected trend.

    2. Silicon nanowires

      Enhancement-Mode Silicon Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors on Plastic Substrates (pages 1821–1824)

      Eun-Ae Chung, Jamin Koo, Myeongwon Lee, Dong-Young Jeong and Sangsig Kim

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900302

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Top-gate field-effect transistors (FETs) with n-channels consisting of n+–p–n+ doped Si nanowires are constructed on plastic substrates via the conventional top-down approach. These top-gate FETs show excellent enhancement-mode characteristics (see image).

    3. Near-field nanopatterning

      You have free access to this content
      Imprinting the Optical Near Field of Microstructures with Nanometer Resolution (pages 1825–1829)

      P. Kühler, F. J. García de Abajo, J. Solis, M. Mosbacher, P. Leiderer, C.N. Afonso and J. Siegel

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900393

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The imaging of complex 2D near-field patterns imprinted on photosensitive films resulting from interference between laser light and light scattered by dielectric microspheres is demonstrated (see image). Using chalcogenide films, the imprint produces optical, electrical, and topographical contrast and allows the writing of erasable features as small as 10 nm. The technique is directly applicable to any type of scattering particle (size, shape, and material)

    4. Shape transitions

      Light-Induced Temperature Transitions in Biodegradable Polymer and Nanorod Composites (pages 1830–1834)

      Kolin C. Hribar, Robert B. Metter, Jamie L. Ifkovits, Thomas Troxler and Jason A. Burdick

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900395

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biodegradable polymer and nanorod (<1% by volume) composites are formulated that heat when exposed to infrared light and undergo shape transitions (see image). The heating is repeatable and tunable based on nanorod concentration and light intensity.

    5. Bioassays

      In vitro Capture, Transport, and Detection of Protein Analytes Using Kinesin-Based Nanoharvesters (pages 1835–1840)

      Amanda Carroll-Portillo, Marlene Bachand, Adrienne C. Greene and George D. Bachand

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900491

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Kinesin biomolecular motors and quantum dots (QDs) are used to capture, transport, and detect target protein analytes (see image). Nanoharvesters (QDs + kinesin + antibodies) provide a novel means for performing microfluidic diagnostic assays that do not rely on mechanical pumping or electrokinetic flow of analytes.

    6. Graphene production

      Liquid-Phase Exfoliation of Graphite Towards Solubilized Graphenes (pages 1841–1845)

      Athanasios B. Bourlinos, Vasilios Georgakilas, Radek Zboril, Theodore A. Steriotis and Athanasios K. Stubos

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900242

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colloidal graphene: Treatment of graphite powder with a series of certain aromatic solvents under sonication leads to the homologous set of colloidal dispersions containing solubilized graphenes (see image).

    7. Pharmaceutical materials

      Facile Preparation of Monodisperse Pharmaceutical Colloidal Spheres of Atorvastatin Calcium via Self-Assembly (pages 1846–1849)

      Hai-Xia Zhang, Hong Zhao, Jie-Xin Wang, Jian-Feng Chen, Yun-Feng Lu and Jimmy Yun

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colloidal spheres of atorvastatin calcium (see picture) with tunable size and enhanced dissolution rate are obtained by a solvation-driven molecular assembly method. This technique enables the large-scale synthesis of monodisperse pharmaceutical spheres, to facilitate their delivery and maximize their therapeutic effectiveness.

    8. Dip-pen nanolithography

      Generation of Metal Photomasks by Dip-Pen Nanolithography (pages 1850–1853)

      Jae-Won Jang, Raymond G. Sanedrin, Andrew J. Senesi, Zijian Zheng, Xiaodong Chen, Seongpil Hwang, Ling Huang and Chad A. Mirkin

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801837

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Positive- and negative-type metal photomasks are fabricated by dip-pen nanolithography (see picture). Positive-type photomasks are generated with a multiple-pen array at a rate rivaling electron-beam lithography. For the negative-type photomasks, a poly(ethylene glycol) ink is used as the resist and lift-off material.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanowire networks: Small 16/2009

      Ie-Hong Hong, Shang-Chieh Yen and Fu-Shiang Lin

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The frontispiece shows a scanning tunneling microscopy image of a well-ordered Au silicide nanowire network self-organized on a 16×2 superstructure of a Si(110) surface by post-deposition annealing at 1100 K. This nanomesh consists of two crossed arrays of parallel-aligned Au silicide nanowires with distinctly different sizes and conductivities. The ability to form a perfectly ordered 2D nanomesh on a Si(110) nanotemplate represents a step towards the nanofabrication of integrated 2D crossbar nanocircuits in a very straightforward, fast, cost-effective, and high-throughput process. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Two-Dimensional Self-Organization of an Ordered Au Silicide Nanowire Network on a Si(110) 16×2 Surface” by I.-H. Hong et al., beginning on page 1855.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanowire networks

      Two-Dimensional Self-Organization of an Ordered Au Silicide Nanowire Network on a Si(110)-16 × 2 Surface (pages 1855–1861)

      Ie-Hong Hong, Shang-Chieh Yen and Fu-Shiang Lin

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900286

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A network comprising two crossed arrays of parallel-aligned Au silicide nanowires is self-organized on a Si(110)-16×2 nanopatterned surface by the direct-current heating of about 1.5 monolayers of Au on the surface at 1100 K. The regular crossbar nanomesh exhibits long-range spatial order and high integration density over a mesoscopic area.

    2. Nanoparticles

      Drug/Dye-Loaded, Multifunctional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Combined Targeted Cancer Therapy and Dual Optical/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 1862–1868)

      Santimukul Santra, Charalambos Kaittanis, Jan Grimm and J. Manuel Perez

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900389

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biocompatible, multimodal, and theranostic functional iron oxide nanoparticles (see image) are synthesized using a novel water-based method and exert excellent properties for targeted cancer therapy, and optical and magnetic resonance imaging. A facile, modified solvent diffusion method is used for the co-encapsulation of both an anticancer drug and near-infrared dyes. The resulting nanoparticles could allow for targeted imaging and killing of folate-expressing cancer cells.

    3. Nanoelectrocatalysts

      Polyaniline/Pt Hybrid Nanofibers: High-Efficiency Nanoelectrocatalysts for Electrochemical Devices (pages 1869–1876)

      Shaojun Guo, Shaojun Dong and Erkang Wang

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900190

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts based on PANI nanofiber-supported supra-high density Pt nanoparticles (NPs) or Pt/Pd hybrid NPs (see image) without prior PANI nanofiber functionalization are obtained by mixing the PANI nanofiber, metal precursor, HCOOH, and water at room temperature. The present hybrid-nanofiber-modified electrode exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity towards diverse molecules and is a promising nanoelectrocatalyst for constructing electrochemical devices with high performance.

    4. Single-molecule imaging

      Polarization Portraits of Single Multichromophoric Systems: Visualizing Conformation and Energy Transfer (pages 1877–1888)

      Oleg Mirzov, Robbert Bloem, Peter Ralph Hania, Daniel Thomsson, Hongzhen Lin and Ivan G. Scheblykin

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801168

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel technique, 2D polarization single-molecule imaging, is presented. It allows recording of all steady-state photoluminescence polarization properties of individual molecules or nanoparticles, as well as characterization of excitation energy transfer in these systems (see picture). The technique is applied to single chains and chain aggregates of a π-conjugated polymer.

    5. Plasmonic arrays

      Biosensing by Densely Packed and Optically Coupled Plasmonic Particle Arrays (pages 1889–1896)

      Takumi Sannomiya, Pratap K. Sahoo, Davut I. Mahcicek, Harun H. Solak, Christian Hafner, Dorothee Grieshaber and Janos Vörös

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900284

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Densely packed plasmonic particle arrays (see image) are investigated for biosensing applications. Such particle arrays exhibit interparticle optical coupling creating a strong field between the particles, which is useful for sensing purposes. Their optical and sensor properties are investigated with the aid of a multiple multipole program. The sensitivity limit to detect streptavidin within 3000 s is estimated to be less than 150 pm.

    6. Toxicity

      Toxicity Assessments of Multisized Gold and Silver Nanoparticles in Zebrafish Embryos (pages 1897–1910)

      Ofek Bar-Ilan, Ralph M. Albrecht, Valerie E. Fako and Darin Y. Furgeson

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801716

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Representative micrographs of zebrafish embryos are exposed to control media, 250 μM 10-nm gold nanoparticles (cAu10), or 250 μM 10-nm silver nanoparticles (cAg10). Although the particles are of the same size, the embryo exposed to cAg10 shows various morphological malformations (see image; Scale bar = 0.5 mm) indicating that chemical composition of the nanoparticle is important in inducing toxicity.

  8. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. You have free access to this content
      Keywords Index Small 16/2009 (page 1911)

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990084

  9. Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Authors Index Small 16/2009 (page 1912)

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990085

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION