Small

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 4

February 20, 2009

Volume 5, Issue 4

Pages 415–522

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Fluidic devices: Small 4/2009

      Sung-Wook Choi, In Woo Cheong, Jung-Hyun Kim and Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows images of uniform microspheres and their close-packed lattices. A simple fluidic device is fabricated with a PVC tube, a syringe needle, and a glass capillary tube for generating the uniform microspheres. A variety of materials, including hydrophobic poly(equation image-caprolactone) polymer (left), hydrophobic ethyle-2-cyanoacrylate monomer (center), and hydrophilic gelatin (right) are prepared as uniform microspheres using the fluidic device. Precise control over particle size is achieved by varying the polymer concentration and/or the flow rate for the continuous phase. A tapping method based on solvent evaporation on a concave glass is used for crystallizing these microspheres into close-packed lattices. For more information, please read the Communication “Preparation of Uniform Microspheres Using a Simple Fluidic Device and Their Crystallization into Close-Packed Lattices” by Y. Xia et al. beginning on page 454.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering: Small 4/2009

      Tanja Deckert-Gaudig and Volker Deckert

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent gold crystals can act as ideal substrates for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The cover picture shows the schematic setup using such gold crystals. Their typical thickness is less than 20 nm while the diameter is on the order of a few micrometers. The sample can be easily immobilized on the gold surface, which has a roughness well beyond 1 nm. The excitation light penetrates the gold plate and localized plasmons induced by the metal tip that acts as the main field-enhancing site are generated, leading to a strong and localized Raman signal. The first experiments using cystine as a sample prove the viability of the concept and indicate at least two surface conformers of cystine on gold. For more information, please read the Communication “Ultraflat Transparent Gold Nanoplates: Ideal Substrates for Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering Experiments” by T. Deckert-Gaudig and V. Deckert, beginning on page 432.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Contents: Small 4/2009 (pages 415–420)

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990018

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. News (pages 424–425)

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900159

  5. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanostructure nomenclature

      A Systematic Nomenclature for Codifying Engineered Nanostructures (pages 426–431)

      Darcy J. Gentleman and Warren C. W. Chan

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800490

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An alpha-numeric nomenclature system that specifies the size, shape, composition, surface ligand, and solubility of nanostructures is proposed. In the image, the codified names indicate that the nanostructure on the right is 6-nm large and contains a ZnS shell as compared to the 5 nm figure on the left, all other properties being the same.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering

      Ultraflat Transparent Gold Nanoplates—Ideal Substrates for Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering Experiments (pages 432–436)

      Tanja Deckert-Gaudig and Volker Deckert

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801237

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thin crystalline gold plates provide a perfect surface to immobilize biomolecules for further label-free investigations on the nanometer scale. These first tip-enhanced Raman experiments provide evidence for local variations of cystine adsorption on such ultrasmooth gold surfaces (see image).

    2. Nanowires

      Three-Dimensional Interconnected Silica Nanotubes Templated from Hyperbranched Nanowires (pages 437–439)

      Jia Zhu, Hailin Peng, Stephen T. Connor and Yi Cui

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hyperbranched silica nanotubes that are interconnected in three dimensions are prepared by templating with PbSe hyperbranched nanowires (see image). The structures show a high degree of branching, good structural regularity, and introduce interesting opportunities for the construction of novel 3D nanofluidic devices.

    3. Optics

      Aerobic Synthesis of Cu Nanoplates with Intense Plasmon Resonances (pages 440–443)

      Isabel Pastoriza-Santos, Ana Sánchez-Iglesias, Benito Rodríguez-González and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801088

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-crystalline Cu nanoplates with a prominent in-plane dipole surface plasmon band are fabricated through reduction of copper salt with hydrazine using PVP as stabilizer and no need for inert atmosphere. Due to the lower free-electron character of copper, the interband transitions overlap, and therefore damp, the out-of-plane dipole plasmon resonance (see image).

    4. Click Chemistry

      Peptide-Functionalized, Low-Biofouling Click Multilayers for Promoting Cell Adhesion and Growth (pages 444–448)

      Cameron R. Kinnane, Kim Wark, Georgina K. Such, Angus P. R. Johnston and Frank Caruso

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801012

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A universal method of assembling low-biofouling films that can be engineered to promote the specific adhesion and growth of cells onto surfaces is described (see image). Click chemistry and the layer-by-layer method are used to assemble films of poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate, which are functionalized with the adhesion-promoting peptide, arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD).

    5. Optical microscopy

      Large-Scale Ordered Plastic Nanopillars for Quantitative Live-Cell Imaging (pages 449–453)

      Kheya Sengupta, Eric Moyen, Magali Macé, Anne-Marie Benoliel, Anne Pierres, Frank Thibaudau, Laurence Masson, Laurent Limozin, Pierre Bongrand and Margrit Hanbücken

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800836

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent nanopatterned plastic substrates are prepared by molding a photopolymer inside nanoporous ordered anodic alumina and subsequently etching away the mold. The array of glass-supported, index-matched nanopillars is ordered over a large area. They can serve as a platform for studying the interaction of living cells with nanotopography (see image) using quantitative optical microscopy.

    6. Fluidic devices

      Preparation of Uniform Microspheres Using a Simple Fluidic Device and Their Crystallization into Close-Packed Lattices (pages 454–459)

      Sung-Wook Choi, In Woo Cheong, Jung-Hyun Kim and Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801498

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Uniform microspheres using a fluidic device: A simple fluidic device is demonstrated to produce uniform microspheres with sizes ranging from 30 to 250 µm (see image). A tapping method with a concave glass is also developed to crystallize these microspheres into close-packed lattices. These techniques provide a powerful strategy for the scalable and continuous production of microspheres, as well as their crystalline lattices.

    7. Coaxial nanocables

      Conducting Performance of Individual Ag@C Coaxial Nanocables: Ideal Building Blocks for Interconnects in Nanoscale Devices (pages 460–465)

      Weihong Xu and Shu-Hong Yu

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801236

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      How to connect: Individual ultralong Ag@C coaxial nanocables can be used as potential interconnects. The nanocables show excellent electrical transport properties in the temperature range of 5.76–300 K (see picture), and the room-temperature conductivity of the Ag nanowire core is almost the same as that of the bulk silver.

    8. Nanocomposites

      High-Strength, High-Toughness Composite Fibers by Swelling Kevlar in Nanotube Suspensions (pages 466–469)

      Ian O'Connor, Hugh Hayden, Jonathan N. Coleman and Yurii K. Gun'ko

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801102

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Kevlar–nanotube composite fibers of high strength and toughness are demonstrated. Commercially available Kevlar fibers are soaked in a suspension of nanotubes in the solvent N-methylpyrrolidone, resulting in swelling of the fibers, and allowing the nanotubes to diffuse into the interior of the fiber (see image). The resulting composites are stronger and tougher than the original Kevlar fibers.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Proteins

      Cytochrome c on Silica Nanoparticles: Influence of Nanoparticle Size on Protein Structure, Stability, and Activity (pages 470–476)

      Wen Shang, Joseph H. Nuffer, Virginia A. Muñiz-Papandrea, Wilfredo Colón, Richard W. Siegel and Jonathan S. Dordick

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800995

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adsorption of cytochrome c (cyt c) onto silica nanoparticle (SNP) surfaces induces changes in protein structures and properties. Cyt c on SNPs with larger sizes experiences greater changes in the global structure and stability. The local heme microenvironment within the protein structure also shows a more pronounced particle-size dependent disruption on larger SNPs than on smaller ones (see image).

    2. Nanolithography

      AFM Tip Hammering Nanolithography (pages 477–483)

      You Wang, Xiaodong Hong, Jun Zeng, Baoquan Liu, Bin Guo and Honghua Yan

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800966

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Imprinted and embossed patterns with a sub-20-nm line-width resolution (see image) are generated at low cost and high speed by using a vibrating AFM tip in tapping mode as a nanohammer to forge hex-spherical polystyrene arrays tailored in polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene/butylenes)-block-polystyrene thin films. The patterns generated by this AFM tip hammering nanolithography can be quickly erased by thermal annealing.

    3. DNA recognition

      Single-Molecule Experiments to Elucidate the Minimal Requirement for DNA Recognition by Transcription Factor Epitopes (pages 484–495)

      Katrin Wollschläger, Katharina Gaus, André Körnig, Rainer Eckel, Sven-David Wilking, Matthew McIntosh, Zsuzsanna Majer, Anke Becker, Robert Ros, Dario Anselmetti and Norbert Sewald

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800945

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molecular recognition between transcription factors and their cognate DNA sequences is crucial for living systems. Binding of epitopes derived from the transcription factor PhoB is analyzed at the single-molecule level by quantitative AFM and dynamic force spectroscopy (see picture). These experiments provide a concise picture of the contribution of epitopes or single amino acid residues to DNA binding.

    4. Ferrocene

      Field-Emission Resonances at Tip/α,ω-Mercaptoalkyl Ferrocene/Au Interfaces Studied by STM (pages 496–502)

      Lars Müller-Meskamp, Silvia Karthäuser, Harold J. W. Zandvliet, Melanie Homberger, Ulrich Simon and Rainer Waser

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800802

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Current–distance and current–voltage spectroscopy are applied on ordered domains of α,ω-mercaptoalkyl ferrocenes (see image). The results give evidence that Fowler–Nordheim tunneling is the main conduction mechanism of ferrocene and moreover Gundlach current oscillations are observed. The apparent barrier height of ferrocene is determined independently by two methods with high accuracy.

    5. Solid-state reactions

      In situ X-ray Measurements to Probe a New Solid-State Polycondensation Mechanism for the Design of Supramolecular Organo-Bridged Silsesquioxanes (pages 503–510)

      Philippe Dieudonné, Michel Wong Chi Man, Benoît P. Pichon, Luc Vellutini, Jean-Louis Bantignies, Christophe Blanc, Gaëlle Creff, Stéphanie Finet, Jean-Louis Sauvajol, Catherine Bied and Joël J. E. Moreau

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800254

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In situ SAXS/WAXS measurements are performed to follow the different steps involved in the synthetic process of a supramolecular hybrid material. A new sol–gel synthesis mechanism is proposed. The structural long-range ordering of the crosslinked material is obtained after hydrolysis of the precursor, crystallization of the hydrolyzed species (a), and polycondensation in the solid state (b) (see image).

    6. Nanoparticle toxicity

      Adverse Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Human Dermal Fibroblasts and How to Protect Cells (pages 511–520)

      Zhi Pan, Wilson Lee, Lenny Slutsky, Richard A. F. Clark, Nadine Pernodet and Miriam H. Rafailovich

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800798

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Coating saves cells: Both rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (see image) can easily penetrate through cell membranes and impair cell function, with the latter being more potent at producing damage. A dense grafted polymer brush coating on TiO2 nanoparticles prevents the particles from adhering to cell membranes and hence penetrating cells, which effectively decreases reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and protects the cells.

  8. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Keywords Index Small 4/2009 (page 521)

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990019

  9. Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. authors Index Small 4/2009 (page 522)

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990020

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION