Small

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 6

March 20, 2009

Volume 5, Issue 6

Pages 635–759

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanoparticle growth: Small 6/2009

      Steven T. Christensen, Jeffrey W. Elam, Federico A. Rabuffetti, Qing Ma, Steven J. Weigand, Byeongdu Lee, Soenke Seifert, Peter C. Stair, Kenneth R. Poeppelmeier, Mark C. Hersam and Michael J. Bedzyk

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image shows a scanning electron microscopy image of platinum nanoparticles grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the {001} faces of strontium titinate nanocubes. The SrTiO3 single-crystal cubes are grown by hydrothermal methods to have 60-nm-long edges. Precise control over the Pt particle size, dispersion, and chemical state is achieved by controlling the number of ALD cycles. This is demonstrated by X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of the early stages of particle nucleation and growth. Coupling ALD to hydrothermal synthesis enables a flexible and scalable method for the rational design of oxide-supported, uniform noble metal clusters, with atomic-level control over the composite composition and surface structure. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanoparticles on Strontium Titanate Nanocubes by Atomic Layer Deposition” by M. J. Bedzyk et al. beginning on page 750.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Virus imaging: Small 6/2009

      Feng Li, Zhi-Ping Zhang, Jun Peng, Zong-Qiang Cui, Dai-Wen Pang, Ke Li, Hong-Ping Wei, Ya-Feng Zhou, Ji-Kai Wen and Xian-En Zhang

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a fluorescence image of a living Vero cell being “infected” by capsid–quantum-dot (QD) hybrid nanoparticles through caveolae-mediated endocytosis. The hybrid nanoparticles are constructed by self-assembly of the major capsid protein of simian virus 40 (SV40) in the presence of QDs. When incubated with living cells, they are found to mimic the early infection steps of wild-type SV40, which confirms the feasibility of tracing viruses with encapsidated QDs in living cells. QD encapsidation may serve as a new strategy for ultrasensitive intracellular or in vivo imaging of viral behaviors and targeted nanoparticle delivery as well. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Imaging Viral Behaviors in Mammalian Cells with Self-Assembled Capsid–Quantum-Dot Hybrid Particles” by X.-E. Zhang et al. beginning on page 718.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Contents: Small 6/2009 (pages 635–640)

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990028

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. News (pages 644–645)

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900339

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Nanoprisms

      Colloidal Gold and Silver Triangular Nanoprisms (pages 646–664)

      Jill E. Millstone, Sarah J. Hurst, Gabriella S. Métraux, Joshua I. Cutler and Chad A. Mirkin

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801480

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoprisms, such as the Au prisms in the image (scale bar: 83 nm), exhibit unique chemical and optical features, promising for applications ranging from catalysis to therapeutics. This Review focuses on the wide variety of synthetic methods for preparing nanoprism structures and not only highlights some of the most effective approaches but also examines what these methods have uncovered about the underlying principles of colloidal anisotropic nanoparticle growth.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Stem cells

      TiO2 Nanotube Surfaces: 15 nm—An Optimal Length Scale of Surface Topography for Cell Adhesion and Differentiation (pages 666–671)

      Jung Park, Sebastian Bauer, Karl Andreas Schlegel, Friedrich W. Neukam, Klaus von der Mark and Patrik Schmuki

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801476

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using aligned TiO2 nanotubes with different diameters in the range between 15 and 100 nm synthesized on titanium by an electrochemical approach, it is shown that 15 nm is a universal surface geometric constant that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of different cell types (such as mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells; see image).

    2. Nanocrystals

      DNA Aptamer-Passivated Nanocrystal Synthesis: A Facile Approach for Nanoparticle-Based Cancer Cell Growth Inhibition (pages 672–675)

      Jong Hyun Choi, Kok Hao Chen, Jae-Hee Han, Amanda M. Chaffee and Michael S. Strano

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801821

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A class of DNA aptamers, recognizing and therapeutically targeting cancer cells, remains functional while forming stable colloidal PbS and Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The aptamer-passivated nanocrystals (see image) are non-cytotoxic to normal cells, whereas MCF-7 human breast cancer cells incorporated with these particles have significantly reduced proliferation. The nanoparticle-aptamer systems provide a platform for novel nanoparticle therapeutics.

    3. Fluorescence

      Optical Detection of Glucose by Means of Metal Nanoparticles or Semiconductor Quantum Dots (pages 676–680)

      Lily Bahshi, Ronit Freeman, Ron Gill and Itamar Willner

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801403

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The glucose dehydrogenase biocatalyzed generation of NADH by the oxidation of glucose enables the fluorescence detection of glucose by methylene-blue-functionalized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and the colorimetric determination of glucose by the NADH-mediated growth of Au nanoparticles (see image).

    4. Triangular nanocrystals

      Triangular CdS Nanocrystals: Rational Solvothermal Synthesis and Optical Studies (pages 681–684)

      Wei Chen, Kebi Chen, Qing Peng and Yadong Li

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801359

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Triangular wurtzite CdS nanocrystals (see image) with good stability and photoluminescence can be synthesized through a rational solvothermal route. The as-prepared triangles are ideal building blocks for the construction of 3D superlattices to explore novel optical properties.

    5. Colloidosomes

      Stable Magnetic Colloidosomes via Click-Mediated Crosslinking of Nanoparticles at Water–Oil Interfaces (pages 685–688)

      Bappaditya Samanta, Debabrata Patra, Chandramouleeswaran Subramani, Yuval Ofir, Gulen Yesilbag, Amitav Sanyal and Vincent M. Rotello

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801659

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alkyne- and azide-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are co-assembled at the water–oil interface and covalently linked using click chemistry under ambient conditions to create magnetic colloidosomes (see image). These colloidosomes possess high stability, size-selective permeability, and are responsive toward external magnetic stimuli.

    6. Patterning engineered peptides

      Nanopatterning Peptides as Bifunctional Inks for Templated Assembly (pages 689–693)

      Joseph H. Wei, Turgay Kacar, Candan Tamerler, Mehmet Sarikaya and David S. Ginger

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801911

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Peptides selected via cell-surface or phage display for their ability to bind inorganic surfaces can be used as inks in dip-pen nanolithography with sub-100-nm resolution (see image). Two different biotinylated peptides are chosen because they exhibit preferential binding to either gold or silica surfaces and can be used as bifunctional linkers to direct the site-specific assembly of fluorescently-labeled streptavidin.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Magnetic nanoworms

      Systematic Surface Engineering of Magnetic Nanoworms for In vivo Tumor Targeting (pages 694–700)

      Ji-Ho Park, Geoffrey von Maltzahn, Lianglin Zhang, Austin M. Derfus, Dmitri Simberg, Todd J. Harris, Erkki Ruoslahti, Sangeeta N. Bhatia and Michael J. Sailor

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801789

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mouse tumors are targeted with superparamagnetic iron oxide as a model nanoparticle system. Magnetic nanoworms are engineered to optimize their in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency. The type of targeting peptide, the surface coverage of the peptide, its attachment chemistry, and the shape of the nanomaterial (elongated versus spherical) are varied (see picture).

    2. Gold nanorods

      Cellular Uptake and Cytotoxicity of Gold Nanorods: Molecular Origin of Cytotoxicity and Surface Effects (pages 701–708)

      Alaaldin M. Alkilany, Pratik K. Nagaria, Cole R. Hexel, Timothy J. Shaw, Catherine J. Murphy and Michael D. Wyatt

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801546

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold nanorods with different surface charges are prepared using a wet-chemical method combined with layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte coating approaches (see image, scale bar = 100 nm). Toxicity studies using a human colon carcinoma cell line indicate similar toxicity profiles for both positively and negatively coated gold nanorods. Serum proteins from cell growth media adsorb onto nanorods, regardless of initial nanorod surface charge.

    3. Drug delivery

      Dual-Functional Alginic Acid Hybrid Nanospheres for Cell Imaging and Drug Delivery (pages 709–717)

      Rui Guo, Rutian Li, Xiaolin Li, Leyang Zhang, Xiqun Jiang and Baorui Liu

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801375

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alginic acid-poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] monodisperse hybrid nanospheres (ALG–PDEA–Au) are effectively synthesized by using ALG–PDEA nanospheres as nanoreactors and utilizing the particle-interior chemistry (see image). The obtained hybrid nanospheres can simultaneously serve as drug-delivery carriers to load doxorubicin (DOX) and novel optical contrast reagents in cell imaging due to the unique optical properties endowed by embedded gold nanoparticles.

    4. Virus imaging

      Imaging Viral Behavior in Mammalian Cells with Self-Assembled Capsid–Quantum-Dot Hybrid Particles (pages 718–726)

      Feng Li, Zhi-Ping Zhang, Jun Peng, Zong-Qiang Cui, Dai-Wen Pang, Ke Li, Hong-Ping Wei, Ya-Feng Zhou, Ji-Kai Wen and Xian-En Zhang

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801303

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Virus imaging: New chimeric nanostructures, quantum dots (QDs) encapsidated in virus-like particles of a mammalian virus, simian virus 40 (SV40), are constructed through molecular self-assembly. The hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) behave like the wild-type SV40 in entering host cells (see image). This is a novel type of virus tracing strategy based on NP encapsidation.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Imaging Viral Behaviors in Mammalian Cells with Self-Assembled Capsid–Quantum-Dot Hybrid Particles

      Vol. 5, Issue 9, Version of Record online: 22 APR 2009

    5. Pattern formation

      Fabrication of Nanowire Channels with Unidirectional Alignment and Controlled Length by a Simple, Gas-Blowing-Assisted, Selective-Transfer-Printing Technique (pages 727–734)

      Yong-Kwan Kim, Pil Soo Kang, Dae-Il Kim, Gunchul Shin, Gyu Tae Kim and Jeong Sook Ha

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801362

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Directional blowing of N2 gas onto patterned polymer stamps inked with randomly distributed V2O5 nanowires induces alignment of the nanowires perpendicular to the long axis of the line patterns (see picture). Subsequent transfer of the nanowires on the relief region of the patterned stamp results in the selective transfer of aligned nanowires with a controlled length.

    6. Fuel cells

      Design of an Assembly of Poly(benzimidazole), Carbon Nanotubes, and Pt Nanoparticles for a Fuel-Cell Electrocatalyst with an Ideal Interfacial Nanostructure (pages 735–740)

      Minoru Okamoto, Tsuyohiko Fujigaya and Naotoshi Nakashima

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801742

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A poly(benzimidazole) (PBI)-based electrocatalyst composed of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and Pt nanoparticles is fabricated (see image). The highly efficient and homogeneous loading of the Pt nanoparticles onto the MWNTs is realized by the PBI wrapping on the MWNTs. The obtained nanocomposites show excellent utilization efficiency due to the formation of the “ideal” triple-phase boundary nanostructure in the catalyst.

    7. Gold nanoparticles

      Facile Plasma-Enhanced Deposition of Ultrathin Crosslinked Amino Acid Films for Conformal Biometallization (pages 741–749)

      Kyle D. Anderson, Joseph M. Slocik, Michael E. McConney, Jesse O. Enlow, Rachel Jakubiak, Timothy J. Bunning, Rajesh R. Naik and Vladimir V. Tsukruk

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801843

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Caught on film: Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to modify substrates with highly crosslinked polytyrosine. The deposited film allows the reduction of gold nanoparticles from solution on the surface (see image). This method rapidly creates robust biofilms without the need for wet chemistry and allows simple patterning during the deposition process.

    8. Nanoparticle growth

      Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanoparticles on Strontium Titanate Nanocubes by Atomic Layer Deposition (pages 750–757)

      Steven T. Christensen, Jeffrey W. Elam, Federico A. Rabuffetti, Qing Ma, Steven J. Weigand, Byeongdu Lee, Soenke Seifert, Peter C. Stair, Kenneth R. Poeppelmeier, Mark C. Hersam and Michael J. Bedzyk

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801920

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Deposit account: Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has potential to control the growth of supported noble-metal nanoparticles in an efficient and scalable manner. The image shows platinum nanoparticles grown in three ALD cycles on strontium titanate nanocubes. ALD growth is characterized in terms of the Pt nanoparticle size, spacing, and chemical state.

  8. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Keywords Index Small 6/2009 (page 758)

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990029

  9. Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. authors Index Small 6/2009 (page 759)

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990030

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