Small

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 7

April 6, 2009

Volume 5, Issue 7

Pages 767–867

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Keywords
    9. Authors
    1. Lithography: Small 7/2009

      Rhokyun Kwak, Hoon Eui Jeong and Kahp Y. Suh

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows how vacuum-assisted capillary force lithography allows the gap between microstructures to be bridged by partial curing and vacuum-assisted hydraulic filling. In the first step, the surface of molded microstructures is incompletely cured by exposure to ultraviolet light, owing to the high oxygen permeability of the poly(dimethyl siloxane) mold. During the curing process, oxygen inhibits crosslinking by scavenging initiator radicals in free-radical polymerization. Consequently, a small portion of the base microstructure (<4 µm) is molded to create a monolithic bridge structure by simply applying a nanoscale mold under a slight pressure (≈0.1–0.5 bar) with the impression of channels, meshes, or circles without collapse. In the second step, a low vacuum facilitates migration of the partially cured polymer into the void spaces imposed by the nanoscale mold, thereby forming a dual-scale bridge structure. For more information, please read the Communication “Fabrication of Monolithic Bridge Structures by Vacuum-Assisted Capillary-Force Lithography” by K. Y. Suh et al. beginning on page 790.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Keywords
    9. Authors
    1. Electrical conductivity: Small 7/2009

      Jong H. Kim, Yunoh Jung, Jong Won Chung, Byeong-Kwan An and Soo Young Park

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990032

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows images of highly fluorescent and semiconducting organic nanowires self-assembled from a special cyanstilbene-type aromatic molecule with trifluoromethyl substituents. Also shown are the uniformly patterned arrays of nanowires, fabricated by a simple, one-step soft-lithography method. Aligned nanowire assembly with J-type intermolecular stacking shows very high birefringence, dichroism, polarized emission, and electrical conductivity. For more information, please read the Communication by S. Y. Park et al. beginning on page 804.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Keywords
    9. Authors
    1. Contents: Small 7/2009 (pages 767–782)

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990033

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Keywords
    9. Authors
    1. Microelectrodes

      Microelectrode Arrays for Electrochemistry: Approaches to Fabrication (pages 776–788)

      Xing-Jiu Huang, Aoife M. O'Mahony and Richard G. Compton

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801593

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microelectrode arrays are critical for the development of reproducible and highly efficient electrochemical sensors. In this Review, different techniques for the fabrication of various types of array electrodes are surveyed, including planar or recessed microdisk electrode arrays, microband electrode arrays, interdigitated microelectrode arrays, linear microelectrode arrays, and 3D microelectrode arrays. Such arrays can be random or regular, as illustrated.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Keywords
    9. Authors
    1. Lithography

      Fabrication of Monolithic Bridge Structures by Vacuum-Assisted Capillary-Force Lithography (pages 790–794)

      Rhokyun Kwak, Hoon Eui Jeong and Kahp Y. Suh

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200900219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bridging the gap: Vacuum-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) allows the fabrication of monolithic, suspended bridge structures (see picture) by exploiting partial curing kinetics and vacuum-assisted hydraulic filling. A small portion of the base microstructure (<4 µm) is molded to create a bridge structure by simply applying a nanoscale mold with the impression of channels, meshes, or circles.

    2. Nanoparticle composites

      Phase-Inversion Method for Incorporation of Metal Nanoparticles into Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites (pages 795–799)

      Samuel Sánchez, Esteve Fàbregas, Hideo Iwai and Martin Pumera

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801482

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A general method for facile incorporation of water-soluble metal nanoparticles in carbon-nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites is described. Gold nanoparticle (AuNP)/CNT/polysulfone (PSf) composites are prepared by the phase-inversion method (see picture), which involves immobilization of the nanoparticles and coagulation of the soft composite at same time.

    3. Photoluminescence

      Anomalous Photoluminescence in Silica-Coated Semiconductor Nanocrystals After Heat Treatment (pages 800–803)

      Norio Murase and Ping Yang

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801302

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      When emitting semiconductor nanocrystals coated with a thin silica layer containing dispersed ions are heated, the emission efficiency is drastically increased along with a red-shift and a narrowing of the photoluminescence spectrum. Originally green-emitting CdTe nanocrystals change to red emission without a change in size (see image). This is ascribed to the formation of small clusters in the silica layer during heating.

    4. Electrical conductivity

      Fabrication of a Patterned Assembly of Semiconducting Organic Nanowires (pages 804–807)

      Jong H. Kim, Yunoh Jung, Jong Won Chung, Byeong-Kwan An and Soo Young Park

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A well-aligned semiconducting organic nanowire assembly is obtained by a simple, one-step soft lithographic method (see image). A patterned nanowire assembly that forms J-type intermolecular aggregation shows high birefringence, dichroism, polarized emission, and electrical conductivity (4.9 × 10−6 S cm−1).

    5. Semiconductor nanocrystals

      Wavefunction Mapping of Immobilized InP Semiconductor Nanocrystals (pages 808–812)

      Giuseppe Maruccio, Christian Meyer, Tomohiro Matsui, Dmitri V. Talapin, Stephen G. Hickey, Horst Weller and Roland Wiesendanger

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800900

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On the map: The electronic structure of InP nanocrystals (NCs) is studied and the symmetry of the squared wavefunctions (WFs) corresponding to the confined states in the spectral density is mapped directly (see picture). The WF maps show s- and p-type character and charging energies that decrease when higher orbitals are occupied. Coupling of the NCs with the environment influences the WF energies and symmetries.

    6. Mineralization

      Virus-Templated Silica Nanoparticles (pages 813–816)

      Nicole F. Steinmetz, Sachin N. Shah, J. Elaine Barclay, Ghanasyam Rallapalli, George P. Lomonossoff and David. J. Evans

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801348

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An engineered variant of the plant virus, Cowpea mosaic virus, can template the controlled fabrication of silica nanoparticles of ≈30-nm diameter under environmentally benign conditions at ambient temperature and in aqueous solvent. This is the first reported mineralization of the external surface of a cage-like viral bionanoparticle (see image).

    7. Nanosystems

      An Integrated Multifunctional Nanosystem from Command Nanoparticles and Enzymes (pages 817–820)

      Mikhail Motornov, Jian Zhou, Marcos Pita, Ihor Tokarev, Venkateshwarlu Gopishetty, Evgeny Katz and Sergiy Minko

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801550

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A hierarchical nanosytem combines pH-responsive Pickering emulsion and specific enzymatic reactions (see image). Multiple signals received from the surrounding environment and processed by the integrated nanosystem are used for the direct (without an external computer or energy source) regulating and turning on and off of a range of properties of the integrated system (electrical conductivity, transport of ions, water- and oil-soluble molecules)

    8. Surface patterning

      Laterally Patterned Ultraflat Surfaces (pages 821–825)

      Nicolas Vogel, Mathieu Jung, Markus Retsch, Wolfgang Knoll, Ulrich Jonas and Ingo Köper

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801583

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On the flat: Patterned surfaces without any topographic features are prepared by a modified template-stripping procedure. Their heterogeneous nature is revealed by the AFM phase contrast between gold and silicon dioxide areas (see image). Straightforward assembly of patterned, multifunctional monolayers paired with their ultralow surface roughness makes these surfaces attractive substrates for any monolayer-based device.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Keywords
    9. Authors
    1. Carbon nanotubes

      Carbon-Nanotube–Polymer Nanocomposites for Field-Emission Cathodes (pages 826–831)

      Thomas Connolly, Richard C. Smith, Yenny Hernandez, Yurii Gun'ko, Jonathan N. Coleman and J. David Carey

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801094

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Well-dispersed carbon-nanotube (CNT) composites can be produced by solution processing from which electron emission can be observed at low nanotube content (see image). The synthesis of randomly oriented nanotube–polymer composites by solution processing allows the development of CNT-based large area cathodes produced using a scalable technology.

    2. Native cell membranes

      Elasticity Mapping of Pore-Suspending Native Cell Membranes (pages 832–838)

      Bärbel Lorenz, Ingo Mey, Siegfried Steltenkamp, Tamir Fine, Christina Rommel, Martin Michael Müller, Alexander Maiwald, Joachim Wegener, Claudia Steinem and Andreas Janshoff

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800930

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Native cell membranes are prepared on microporous substrates to measure the apparent membrane stiffness using atomic force microscopy. Fluorescence (see image) and scanning electron microscopy reveal a strong correlation between the density of the actin cytoskeleton and apparent membrane spring constant values. Chemical fixation results in an increase of membrane stiffness.

    3. Virus RNA

      Sequence-Specific HCV RNA Quantification Using the Size-Dependent Nonlinear Optical Properties of Gold Nanoparticles (pages 839–845)

      Jelani Griffin, Anant Kumar Singh, Dulal Senapati, Eumin Lee, Kevin Gaylor, Jeanette Jones-Boone and Paresh Chandra Ray

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801334

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold assay : The hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS) intensity of gold nanoparticles (see picture) is used for the screening and quantification of hepatitis C virus RNA without any modification, with excellent sensitivity (60 pm) and selectivity (single base-pair mismatch).

    4. Cytotoxicity

      Size-Dependent Cytotoxicity of Monodisperse Silica Nanoparticles in Human Endothelial Cells (pages 846–853)

      Dorota Napierska, Leen C. J. Thomassen, Virginie Rabolli, Dominique Lison, Laetitia Gonzalez, Micheline Kirsch-Volders, Johan A. Martens and Peter H. Hoet

      Version of Record online: 13 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800461

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cytotoxicity of monodisperse amorphous silica particles of the same morphology and shape but different size is examined in human endothelial cells (EAHY926 cell line). The results indicate that, in human endothelial cells, exposure to silica nanoparticles causes cytotoxic damage (as determined by the tetrazolium reduction and lactate dehydrogenase assays) in a dose- and size-related manner (see image).

    5. Mesoporous materials

      Nanoparticles of Mesoporous SO3H-Functionalized Si-MCM-41 with Superior Proton Conductivity (pages 854–859)

      Roland Marschall, Inga Bannat, Armin Feldhoff, Lianzhou Wang, Gao Qing (Max) Lu and Michael Wark

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801235

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mesoporous silica particles 100 nm in diameter functionalized with sulfonic acid groups are prepared using a simple and fast in situ co-condensation procedure. The resulting SO3H-MCM-41 nanoparticles (see image) exhibit a highly ordered hexagonal pore structure and demonstrate very high proton conductivities. Superior proton conductivity values indicate a particle size dependence of the proton conductivity.

    6. Nanoparticle arrays

      Cobalt Nanoparticle Arrays made by Templated Solid-State Dewetting (pages 860–865)

      Yong-Jun Oh, Caroline A. Ross, Yeon Sik Jung, Yang Wang and Carl V. Thompson

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801433

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Keeping order: Annealing of a Co film deposited on a topographical substrate with 200-nm-period pits leads to well-ordered arrays of magnetic islands (see image). The Co nanoparticle size and uniformity are related to the initial film thickness, annealing temperature, and template geometry.

  7. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Keywords
    9. Authors
    1. Keywords Index Small 7/2009 (page 866)

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990034

  8. Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Keywords
    9. Authors
    1. authors Index Small 7/2009 (page 867)

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990035

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION