Small

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 9

May 4, 2009

Volume 5, Issue 9

Pages 987–1079

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Stem cells: Small 9/2009

      Jungwoo Lee and Nicholas A. Kotov

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990043

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image shows notch ligands presenting artificial 3D thymic microenvironments that are created on inverted colloidal crystal scaffolds utilizing a layer-by-layer molecular assembly technique. A multicomponent layer-by-layer film substitutes the function of thymic stromal cells and successfully supports ex vivo T-cell differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells. For more information, please read the Communication “Notch Ligand Presenting Acellular 3D Microenvironments for ex vivo Human Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Culture made by Layer-By-Layer Assembly” by J. Lee and N. A. Kotov, beginning on page 1008.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Gold nanoparticles: Small 9/2009

      Daniel Aydin, Marco Schwieder, Ilia Louban, Stefan Knoppe, Jens Ulmer, Tobias L. Haas, Henning Walczak and Joachim P. Spatz

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture illustrates hierarchical nanostructures. Hexagonally ordered gold nanoparticle arrays with an interparticle distance of tens to hundreds of nanometers are micropatterned by conventional UV or electron-beam lithography. In the next step, gold nanoparticles are used as anchor-points to attach recombinant proteins allowing for the control of protein presentation at two different length scales. For more information, please read the Communication “Micro-Nanostructured Protein Arrays: A Tool for Geometrically Controlled Ligand Presentation” by J. P. Spatz et al., beginning on page 1014.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Contents: Small 9/2009 (pages 987–992)

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990045

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Biological activity

      Improving Biocompatibility of Implantable Metals by Nanoscale Modification of Surfaces: An Overview of Strategies, Fabrication Methods, and Challenges (pages 996–1006)

      Fabio Variola, Fiorenzo Vetrone, Ludovic Richert, Pawel Jedrzejowski, Ji-Hyun Yi, Sylvia Zalzal, Sylvain Clair, Andranik Sarkissian, Dmitrii F. Perepichka, James D. Wuest, Federico Rosei and Antonio Nanci

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801186

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The principal techniques adopted to yield novel nanostructured versions of familiar biomaterials, focusing particularly on metals, are reviewed. The image is a schematic representation of an optimal implant surface that is synergistically modified by nanostructuring and molecular functionalization. Cells (fluorescently labeled and not to scale) can benefit from both physico/chemical and molecular signaling to achieve better implant integration in host tissues.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Stem cells

      Notch Ligand Presenting Acellular 3D Microenvironments for ex vivo Human Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Culture made by Layer-By-Layer Assembly (pages 1008–1013)

      Jungwoo Lee and Nicholas A. Kotov

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801242

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Notch ligands presenting artificial 3D thymic microenvironments are created on ICC scaffolds utilizing a layer-by-layer molecular assembly technique (see image). A multicomponent LBL film substitutes the function of thymic stromal cells and successfully supports ex vivo T-cell differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    2. Gold nanoparticles

      Micro-Nanostructured Protein Arrays: A Tool for Geometrically Controlled Ligand Presentation (pages 1014–1018)

      Daniel Aydin, Marco Schwieder, Ilia Louban, Stefan Knoppe, Jens Ulmer, Tobias L. Haas, Henning Walczak and Joachim P. Spatz

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel approach for the rapid fabrication of extended areas of micrometer-scaled patches of quasi-hexagonally ordered gold nanoparticle arrays (see image) is presented. The resulting substrates serve as templates for the site-specific immobilization of proteins to gold nanoparticles enabling nanoscopically and microscopically controlled protein deposition.

    3. CNT/polymer composites

      Lyotropic Liquid-Crystalline Solutions of High-Concentration Dispersions of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polymers (pages 1019–1024)

      Hang Woo Lee, Wei You, Soumendra Barman, Sondra Hellstrom, Melburne C. LeMieux, Joon Hak Oh, Shuhong Liu, Takenori Fujiwara, Wechung Maria Wang, Bin Chen, Yong Wan Jin, Jong Min Kim and Zhenan Bao

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200800640

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Line up! Aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) films are formed from a lyotropic liquid-crystalline high-concentration SWNT/polymer composite (≈2 mg mL−1) dispersion. Birefringence from cross-polarized microscopy is demonstrated as a uniaxial alignment of SWNTs (see images).

    4. Nanowire arrays

      Catalytic Growth of Single-Crystalline V2O5 Nanowire Arrays (pages 1025–1029)

      Jesus M. Velazquez and Sarbajit Banerjee

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801278

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arrays of V2O5 nanowires are grown on silicon substrates by a catalytic vapor–solid mechanism (see image). The obtained nanowires are single-crystalline and highly oriented with their lengths and substrate coverage controlled by the duration of the reaction, reaction temperature, and flow velocity. The growth of these nanowire arrays paves the way for the fabrication of novel battery architectures based on the charging/discharging of individual nanowires.

    5. Nanoparticle targeting

      Destruction and Control of Toxoplasmagondii Tachyzoites Using Gold Nanosphere/Antibody Conjugates (pages 1030–1034)

      Dakrong Pissuwan, Stella M. Valenzuela, Catherine M. Miller, Murray C. Killingsworth and Michael B. Cortie

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The protozoan parasiteToxoplasma gondii can be selectively targeted and photothermally destroyed by gold nanosphere/antibody conjugates (see image). The optical response of the nanospheres within the “tissue window” is shifted and enhanced by aggregation. Attachment of the conjugates alone, even without plasmonic heating, lowers the infectivity of the organism.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Bioconjugates

      An Intrinsically Fluorescent Recognition Ligand Scaffold Based on Chaperonin Protein and Semiconductor Quantum-Dot Conjugates (pages 1036–1042)

      Hongzhi Xie, Yi-Fen Li, Hiromi K. Kagawa, Jonathan D. Trent, Kumara Mudalige, Mircea Cotlet and Basil I. Swanson

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mutant chaperonin originating from S. Shibatae is genetically engineered to bind water-soluble semiconductor quantum dots, forming a bioconjugate characterized by high stability, controlled stoichiometry, enhanced photostability, and brightness of the bound quantum dots (see image). This bioconjugate becomes a highly specific biosensor for biological targets when ligands are inserted at the protein solvent exposed side.

    2. Etching

      Simultaneous Fabrication of Very High Aspect Ratio Positive Nano- to Milliscale Structures (pages 1043–1050)

      Long Qing Chen, Mary B. Chan-Park, Qing Zhang, Peng Chen, Chang Ming Li and Sai Li

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple technique is developed for the simultaneous fabrication of positive very high aspect ratio nanostructures together with micro-or millistructures. The combined technique involves the residual pattern of thin-film over-etching technique, thermal oxidation, and HF etching. As a demonstration, a simple positive Si nanofluidic master mold with feature dimensions varying continuously from 1 mm to 200 nm (aspect ratio 6.75) is fabricated (see image).

    3. Inkjet printing

      Inkjet-Printed Multicolor Arrays of Highly Luminescent Nanocrystal-Based Nanocomposites (pages 1051–1057)

      Joo Yeon Kim, Chiara Ingrosso, Vahid Fakhfouri, Marinella Striccoli, Angela Agostiano, M. Lucia Curri and Jurgen Brugger

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801315

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single- and multicolor pixel arrays made of CHCl3 inks based on polystyrene (PS) functionalized with differently sized CdSe@ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) are inkjet-printed (see image). The dispersibility of the highly luminescent colloidal NCs into CHCl3 allows the selection of a solvent as a carrier for highly processable nanocomposite inks, which preserve the optical properties and processability of NCs and PS, thus providing reliable dispensing.

    4. Memristive behavior

      Coupled Ionic and Electronic Transport Model of Thin-Film Semiconductor Memristive Behavior (pages 1058–1063)

      Dmitri B. Strukov, Julien L. Borghetti and R. Stanley Williams

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801323

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A physical model of memristive behavior in semiconductor thin films is presented. The model is based on numerical solutions of coupled drift-diffusion equations for electrons and ions with appropriate boundary conditions. Mobile ion distributions and current–voltage characteristics of the device for both steady-state bias conditions and for dynamical switching are examined to obtain physical insight into the transport processes (see image).

    5. Electron-beam lithography

      A Simple Top-Down/Bottom-Up Approach to Sectored, Ordered Arrays of Nanoscopic Elements Using Block Copolymers (pages 1064–1069)

      Soojin Park, Ozgur Yavuzcetin, Bokyung Kim, Mark T. Tuominen and Thomas P. Russell

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801573

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A top-down electron-beam lithography approach is combined with a bottom-up solvent annealing process to show that micellar arrays of polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) block copolymers with a high degree of lateral order can be produced on a surface where sectoring is defined by the electron-beam patterning (see image).

    6. Membrane protein arrays

      A Microwell Array Platform for Picoliter Membrane Protein Assays (pages 1070–1077)

      Andreas Binkert, Philipp Studer and Janos Vörös

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200801289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A microwell array on a planar waveguide is designed to investigate protein–lipid membrane interactions (see image). Wells are treated with lipid vesicles and proteins using a pin and ring spotter capable of reaching picoliter precision. Deposition of stable lipid bilayers and assaying of annexin V, a model protein that binds in a calcium-dependent manner, is demonstrated in subnanoliter wells.

  7. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. You have free access to this content
      Imaging Viral Behaviors in Mammalian Cells with Self-Assembled Capsid–Quantum-Dot Hybrid Particles

      F. Li, Z.-P. Zhang, J. Peng, Z.-Q. Cui, D.-W. Pang, K. Li, H.-P. Wei, Y.-F. Zhou, J.-K. Wen and X.-E. Zhang

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990046

      This article corrects:
  8. Keywords

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Keywords Index Small 9/2009 (page 1078)

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990041

  9. Authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Keywords
    10. Authors
    1. Authors Index Small 9/2009 (page 1079)

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200990042

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