Small

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 15

August 2 2010

Volume 6, Issue 15

Pages 1571–1692

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Cell imaging: Albumin Nanoshell Encapsulation of Near-Infrared-Excitable Rare-Earth Nanoparticles Enhances Biocompatibility and Enables Targeted Cell Imaging (Small 15/2010)

      Dominik J. Naczynski, Tamar Andelman, David Pal, Suzie Chen, Richard E. Riman, Charles M. Roth and Prabhas V. Moghe

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image illustrates cell-targetable, albumin nanoshells encapsulating rare-earth-doped nanoparticles ((RE)ANSs) that are capable of generating upconversion fluorescence after near-infrared irradiation. The formation of (RE)ANSs creates water-dispersible composite particles that can be subsequently functionalized with tumor-targeting peptides, which can then preferentially bind to integrin receptors expressed on U87 human glioblastoma cells. The yellow signal seen in the tumor-targeting image represents colocalization of the autofluorescent albumin nanoshell (green) and the encapsulated rare-earth nanoparticles (red). These findings highlight the promise of (RE)ANSs for imaging cancer in vitro and the potential for targeting imaging of cancer sites in vivo. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Albumin Nanoshell Encapsulation of Near-Infrared-Excitable Rare-Earth Nanoparticles Enhances Biocompatibility and Enables Targeted Cell Imaging” by P. V. Moghe and co-workers, beginning on page 1631.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Nanocircuits: Fabrication of a 3D Nanoscale Crossbar Circuit by Nanotransfer-Printing Lithography (Small 15/2010)

      Colin Stuart, Hee-Kun Park and Yong Chen

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the structure and a scanning electron microscopy image of a 3D nanoscale crossbar circuit fabricated by nanotransfer printing lithography. An array of parallel Au nanowires of 100 nm width and 100 nm spacing are printed onto an electrically switchable polymer layer, and the printing process can be repeated to fabricate a 3D circuit with multiple layers of the polymers and nanowires aligned along different directions. The conductance of the polymer sandwiched between each pair of nanowires can be modified by applying voltage biases on the nanowires. The 3D architectures can significantly increase the device density and complexity in electronic circuits, generate photonic crystals or plasmonic structures with novel optical properties, and mimic 3D neural networks with field configurable plasticity. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Fabrication of a 3D Nanoscale Crossbar Circuit by Nanotransfer-Printing Lithography” by Y. Chen and co-workers, beginning on page 1663.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Contents: Small 15/2010 (pages 1571–1576)

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090049

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. White light-emitting diodes

      Semiconductor-Nanocrystals-Based White Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 1577–1588)

      Quanqin Dai, Chad E. Duty and Michael Z. Hu

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000144

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In response to the ever-growing demands for energy, solid-state lighting, for example, using white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs), is considered to be the promising source. In this review, the recent progress in semiconductor-nanocrystals-based WLEDs is highlighted, different approaches for generating white light are compared, and the benefits and challenges of solid-state lighting technology are discussed.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Protein imaging

      Direct CdTe Quantum-Dot-Based Fluorescence Imaging of Human Serum Proteins (pages 1589–1592)

      Na Na, Lu Liu, Youri E. C. Taes, Canli Zhang, Bingrong Huang, Yueli Liu, Lin Ma and Jin Ouyang

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000684

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Direct detection of human serum proteins after gel electrophoresis is achieved by a CdTe quantum dot (QD)-based fluorescence imaging technique. Compared with staining methods, it offers higher sensitivity and resolution, and is resistant to photobleaching and photo- or chemical degradation.

    2. Biofuel cells

      Plugging into Enzymes with Light: Photonic “Wiring” of Enzymes with Electrodes for Photobiofuel Cells (pages 1593–1597)

      Ran Tel-Vered, Huseyin Bekir Yildiz, Yi-Ming Yan and Itamar Willner

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The photonic electrical wiring of glucose oxidase (GOx) with an electrode support is demonstrated. The wired GOx electrode is used as the anode in a photobiofuel cell, with a bis-aniline-crosslinked Pt-nanoparticle-functionalized electrode as the H2-generating cathode.

    3. Magnetic susceptibility

      Facile Synthesis of Vanadium Metal–Organic Frameworks and their Magnetic Properties (pages 1598–1602)

      Andrea Centrone, Takuya Harada, Scott Speakman and T. Alan Hatton

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000773

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The facile microwave syntheses of MIL-47 and six new vanadium-metal–organic-framework (V-MOF) materials are described. Small changes in the material crystal structure or removal of guest molecules affects the interactions between the V ions and, consequently, the magnetic properties of the MOF (see image).

    4. Hollow nanostructures

      Controlled Positioning of Large Interfacial Nanocavities via Stress-Engineered Void Localization (pages 1603–1607)

      Firat Güder, Yang Yang, Silvana Goetze, Andreas Berger, Niranjan Ramgir, Dietrich Hesse and Margit Zacharias

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000561

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effect of stress on void nucleation during solid–solid reaction of ZnO/Al2O3 core–shell nanowires and multilayer structures through the nanoscale Kirkendall effect is investigated. A flexible stress-mediated approach is suggested to spatially define the localization of large Kirkendall voids in these systems. New nanostructures with positioned interfacial nanocavities are fabricated. This void engineering strategy can be further extended to other thermal diffusion couples.

    5. Biomaterials

      Light-Sensitive Polypeptide Hydrogel and Nanorod Composites (pages 1608–1611)

      Manoj B. Charati, Ian Lee, Kolin C. Hribar and Jason A. Burdick

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polypeptide hydrogels are combined with light-sensitive gold nanorods (NRs) to produce NIR-triggered hydrogel dissociation (see image). This transition is used for molecule delivery in a triggered or stepwise manner.

    6. Electrospinning

      Superhigh-Throughput Needleless Electrospinning Using a Rotary Cone as Spinneret (pages 1612–1616)

      Bingan Lu, Yajiang Wang, Yanxia Liu, Huigao Duan, Jinyuan Zhou, Zhenxing Zhang, Youqing Wang, Xiaodong Li, Wei Wang, Wei Lan and Erqing Xie

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000454

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An electriferous rotating cone is used as spinneret for the production of nanofibers (see image). It is demonstrated that the production rate by this novel approach is several thousand times higher than that by the single-needle electrospinning technique. This novel technique may attract interest for other applications such as recycling expanded polystyrene, textiles, and filtration meshes.

    7. Nanogap field-effect transistor

      Fullerene-Derivative-Embedded Nanogap Field-Effect-Transistor and Its Nonvolatile Memory Application (pages 1617–1621)

      Seong-Wan Ryu, Chung-Jin Kim, Sungho Kim, Myungsoo Seo, Changhun Yun, Seunghyup Yoo and Yang-Kyu Choi

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902410

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanogap field-effect transistor with PCBM, a C60 derivative, is demonstrated, and evidence for nanogap filling is provided. The transistor serves as a charge-based detector to identify the imbibitions of the nanoscale capillary channel originating from the high-electron receptivity of the PCBM. In an extended application, a 2-bit-per-cell nonvolatile memory operation is performed, and the transistor is verified as a promising candidate without interference from adjacent memory cells.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Polymeric materials: Polymer Carpets (Small 15/2010)

      Ihsan Amin, Marin Steenackers, Ning Zhang, André Beyer, Xianghui Zhang, Tobias Pirzer, Thorsten Hugel, Rainer Jordan and Armin Gölzhäuser

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The frontispiece shows a new class of polymeric material, “polymer carpets,” in which a polymer brush is grown by surface-initiated polymerization of vinyl monomers from a crosslinked 1 nm thick monolayer (nanosheet). Because the polymer brush is attached to a flexible nanosheet, the carpet can display significant morphological changes such as buckling. The main image displays a true-to-scale 3D representation of an AFM scan of a buckled polystyrene carpet. The solid-supported as well as freestanding polymer carpets are found to be mechanically robust, and react towards external stimuli by instantaneous and reversible changes of their shape. The carpet mechanics and the dramatic changes of the film properties (optical, wetting) upon chemical stimuli are investigated in detail as they allow the development of completely new integrated micro-/nanotechnological devices. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Polymer Carpets” by R. Jordan, A. Gölzhäuser, and co-workers, beginning on page 1622.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Polymers

      Polymer Carpets (pages 1623–1630)

      Ihsan Amin, Marin Steenackers, Ning Zhang, André Beyer, Xianghui Zhang, Tobias Pirzer, Thorsten Hugel, Rainer Jordan and Armin Gölzhäuser

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000448

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The preparation of a new class of polymer material, the so-called “polymer carpets,” is reported. A polymer carpet is a freestanding polymer brush grown by surface-initiated polymerization (see image) on a crosslinked 1-nm-thick self-assembled monolayer (nanosheet).

    2. Cell imaging

      Albumin Nanoshell Encapsulation of Near-Infrared-Excitable Rare-Earth Nanoparticles Enhances Biocompatibility and Enables Targeted Cell Imaging (pages 1631–1640)

      Dominik J. Naczynski, Tamar Andelman, David Pal, Suzie Chen, Richard E. Riman, Charles M. Roth and Prabhas V. Moghe

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902403

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanocomposite material consisting of rare-earth-doped nanoparticles capable of upconversion fluorescence encapsulated in a shell of human serum albumin is developed and characterized for use in biological imaging. Functionalization of the albumin surface with cyclic RGD allows for rapid and selective targeting of cell receptors overexpressed on cancer cells.

    3. Strain sensor

      Flexible Piezoelectric ZnO–Paper Nanocomposite Strain Sensor (pages 1641–1646)

      Hemtej Gullapalli, Venkata S. M. Vemuru, Ashavani Kumar, Andres Botello-Mendez, Robert Vajtai, Mauricio Terrones, Satish Nagarajaiah and Pulickel M. Ajayan

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000254

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A piezoelectric nanocomposite material consisting of zinc oxide nanostructures embedded in a matrix of paper (cellulose fibers) is prepared by a solvothermal method. The applicability of this material as a strain sensor is demonstrated by studying its real-time current response under both static and dynamic mechanical loading.

    4. Carbon-nanotube nanorings

      Elastic Deformation of Carbon-Nanotube Nanorings (pages 1647–1655)

      Meng Zheng and Changhong Ke

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000337

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The elastic deformation of carbon- nanotube (CNT) nanorings is characterized by a combined experimental–theoretical approach. The mechanical deformation curvatures of a CNT nanoring when it is pushed against and pulled away from a flat substrate by means of nanomanipulation are captured in situ by a high-resolution electron beam, and are theoretically predicted with a nonlinear elastica theory-based continuum model.

    5. Nanomotors

      Self-Organized Multiconstituent Catalytic Nanomotors (pages 1656–1662)

      John G. Gibbs and Yiping Zhao

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000415

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalytic nanomotors of various geometries self-organize into configurations that exhibit motion not seen by the individual components. Three structures are analyzed: two interlocked tadpole-shaped spinning structures, a structure with a magnetized sphere and a magnetized V-shaped structure (see image), and a nanomotor with a flexible joint which pivots at the point of intersection.

    6. Nanocircuits

      Fabrication of a 3D Nanoscale Crossbar Circuit by Nanotransfer-Printing Lithography (pages 1663–1668)

      Colin Stuart, Hee-Kun Park and Yong Chen

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000514

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold nanowires 100 nm in width and with 100 nm spacing are printed onto an electrically switchable polymer mixed with an epoxy. The fabrication of a four-layer nanowire crossbar circuit is achieved through optimization of the transfer conditions and the polymer/epoxy ratio.

    7. Nanoparticle uptake

      Quantitative Evaluation of Cellular Uptake and Trafficking of Plain and Polyethylene Glycol-Coated Gold Nanoparticles (pages 1669–1678)

      Christina Brandenberger, Christian Mühlfeld, Zulqurnain Ali, Anke-Gabriele Lenz, Otmar Schmid, Wolfgang J. Parak, Peter Gehr and Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000528

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The intracellular localization of gold nanoparticles (NPs), either plain or coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG), is quantitatively analyzed by stereology on transmission electron microscopy images. The NP surface coatings modulate endocytotic uptake pathways and intracellular trafficking. Nonendocytotic entry mechanisms are also involved, as indicated by a minority of PEG-coated NPs free within the cytosol.

    8. Smart materials

      Writing, Self-Healing, and Self-Erasing on Conductive Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives (pages 1679–1685)

      Ivano Alessandri

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000638

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Conductive pressure-sensitive adhesives are adapted to work as laser-writable and rewritable substrates (see image). Self-healing and self- degradation processes were exploited for controlling the lifetime of the written information, whereas protective coatings were used to achieve permanent storage.

    9. Cellular imaging

      Intracellular Imaging with a Graphene-Based Fluorescent Probe (pages 1686–1692)

      Cheng Peng, Wenbing Hu, Yuntao Zhou, Chunhai Fan and Qing Huang

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000560

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A graphene-based fluorescent probe with good biocompatibility is synthesized by fluorescein-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) bridge. The prepared fluorescein–PEG–GO conjugate exhibits excellent pH-tunable fluorescence properties and, more significantly, can be efficiently taken up by cells and serve as a fluorescent nanoprobe for intracellular imaging.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION