Small

Cover image for Small

September 20, 2010

Volume 6, Issue 18

Pages 1947–2064

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Statistical nanopatterning: Vertical Nanowire Architectures: Statistical Processing of Porous Templates Towards Discrete Nanochannel Integration (Small 18/2010)

      Alexandru Vlad, Sorin Melinte, Mária Mátéfi-Tempfli, Luc Piraux and Stefan Mátéfi-Tempfli

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090059

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      How one can devise micro- and nanoporous templates with single-pore resolution? The cover pictures features how a statistical approach provides rigorous selection rules for locating definite sets of objects into random and ordered lattices. The statistical selection method is scalable, and it can be generalized to any type of porous templates for ultimate resolution structuring. Intriguingly, a unified micro- and nanotechnology processing protocol for vertical nanowire crossbar latches in porous alumina templates reduces to a gambling interpretation, following a straightforward, analytical formalism pondered in terms of surface and packing optimization. For more information, please read the Communication “Vertical Nanowire Architectures: Statistical Processing of Porous Templates towards Discrete Nanochannel Integration” by S. Melinte and co-workers, beginning on page 1974.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Carbon nanotube characterization: Optical Visualization of Carbon Nanotubes—a Unifying Linkage Between Microscopic and Spectroscopic Characterization Techniques (Small 18/2010)

      Claudia Backes, Jan M. Englert, Nicolas Bernhard, Frank Hauke and Andreas Hirsch

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows an optical dark-field microscopy image under normal white light illumination of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on Si/SiO2 substrates spin-casted from an aqueous detergent solution. The opaque bilayered substrate enables the visualization of the 1D nanoscaled objects, revealing the structure of the SWCNT bundles and providing an easily accessible tool for the localization and retrieval of the SWCNTs. This allows convenient characterization by other spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Optical bright- and darkand bright-field visualization techniques are thus greatly facilitating and improving nanotube characterization, as spectroscopic and microscopic information can be directly correlated on the same sample area. For more information, please read the Communication “Optical Visualization of Carbon Nanotubes–A Unifying Linkage between Microscopic and Spectroscopic Characterization Techniques” by A. Hirsch and co-workers, beginning on page 1968.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 18/2010) (pages 1947–1951)

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090061

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Intracellular Controlled Drug Delivery (pages 1952–1967)

      Juan L. Vivero-Escoto, Igor I. Slowing, Brian G. Trewyn and Victor S.-Y. Lin

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200901789

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      Recent applications of inorganic nanomaterials in the field of drug delivery have attracted a lot of attention in the last decade. One of the most promising candidates for this matter is mesoporous silica nanoparticles. This review highlights the latest progress in terms of the application of mesoporous silica nanoparticles for intracellular drug delivery.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Optical Visualization of Carbon Nanotubes—a Unifying Linkage Between Microscopic and Spectroscopic Characterization Techniques (pages 1968–1973)

      Claudia Backes, Jan M. Englert, Nicolas Bernhard, Frank Hauke and Andreas Hirsch

      Version of Record online: 30 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201001019

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The optical bright- and dark-field visualization (see image) of single-walled carbon nanotubes spin-casted onto Si/SiO2 substrates with a 300-nm-thick oxide coating is reported. This novel procedure gives access to a low-cost correlation of Raman spectroscopy with microscopic techniques (atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy) greatly facilitating nanotube characterization.

    2. Vertical Nanowire Architectures: Statistical Processing of Porous Templates Towards Discrete Nanochannel Integration (pages 1974–1980)

      Alexandru Vlad, Sorin Melinte, Mária Mátéfi-Tempfli, Luc Piraux and Stefan Mátéfi-Tempfli

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000723

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanowires and statistics: A statistical process for reading ultradense arrays of nanostructured materials is presented (see image). The experimental realization is achieved through selective nanowire growth using porous alumina templates. The statistical patterning approach is found to provide rigorous selection rules for measuring well-defined numbers of nanowires located into nanoporous templates, and provides a conceptual framework for the fabrication of nanowire-based crossbar latches.

    3. Antireflection Behavior of Multidimensional Nanostructures Patterned Using a Conformable Elastomeric Phase Mask in a Single Exposure Step (pages 1981–1985)

      Junyong Park, Sanghoon Yoon, Kisuk Kang and Seokwoo Jeon

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000275

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      Multidimensional nanostructures that are fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning offer a platform to measure antireflection behavior. Transmittance or opaqueness are gradually changed by controlling the thickness of 3D nanostructures.

    4. Inhibition of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticle-Induced Osteogenic Activity in Skeletal Cells by Adsorption of Serum Proteins (pages 1986–1991)

      Lauren A. Hails, Jodie C. Babister, Stefanie Inglis, Sean A. Davis, Richard O. C. Oreffo and Stephen Mann

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000939

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      Stimulation of osteogenesis in human bone marrow stromal cells by surface attachment and endocytosis of arginine-functionalized hydroxyapatite nanoparticles is enhanced when serum proteins are omitted from the culture medium for an initial 24 hour period. This effect, which is related to nanoparticle binding of the serum proteins, could be an important consideration in nanoparticle-induced bioactivity and nanotoxicity in general.

    5. Strategy for the Assembly of Carbon Nanotube–Metal Nanoparticle Hybrids Using Biointerfaces (pages 1992–1995)

      Sang N. Kim, Joseph M. Slocik and Rajesh R. Naik

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000755

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      Gold-plated: Single-wall carbon nanotube–gold nanoparticle (SWNT-AuNP) hybrids are assembled using a combination of nucleic acid (DNA) and a small peptide to drive the self-assembly process. The functionalization of SWNTs with AuNP is efficient and reversible. These SWNT-AuNP hybrids could be potentially used in sensing applications.

    6. Modeling Size and Shape Effects on the Order–Disorder Phase-Transition Temperature of CoPt Nanoparticles (pages 1996–1999)

      Weihong Qi, Yejun Li, Shiyun Xiong and Shuit-Tong Lee

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000274

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The order–disorder transition temperature of CoPt nanoparticles depends on particle size and morphology. The predictions given by the bond-energy model are consistent with recently published experiments in the literature, suggesting that the order–disorder transition of CoPt nanoparticles is a surface-dominant phenomenon.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin-Directed Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals: Tailoring the Plasmon Coupling Through Controllable Gap Distances

      Li Zhang, Huanjun Chen, Jianfang Wang, Yuan Fang Li, Jian Wang, You Sang, Sai Jin Xiao, Lei Zhan and Cheng Zhi Huang

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Linear chains of Au nanorods (NRs) or bifurcated junctions of NRs/nanospheres are fabricated via the crosslinking of H-type tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS) aggregates in solution. The interparticle gap distances and thus plasmon coupling are tuned by varying the porphyrin concentration. A biological procedure using a dark-field light scattering technique is employed to confirm the assembly mechanism.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin-Directed Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals: Tailoring the Plasmon Coupling Through Controllable Gap Distances (pages 2001–2009)

      Li Zhang, Huanjun Chen, Jianfang Wang, Yuan Fang Li, Jian Wang, You Sang, Sai Jin Xiao, Lei Zhan and Cheng Zhi Huang

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000354

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Linear chains of Au nanorods (NRs) or bifurcated junctions of NRs/nanospheres are fabricated via the crosslinking of H-type tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS) aggregates in solution. The interparticle gap distances and thus plasmon coupling are tuned by varying the porphyrin concentration. A biological procedure using a dark-field light scattering technique is employed to confirm the assembly mechanism.

    2. Fabrication of Carbon Nanoscrolls from Monolayer Graphene (pages 2010–2019)

      Dan Xia, Qingzhong Xue, Jie Xie, Huijuan Chen, Cheng Lv, Flemming Besenbacher and Mingdong Dong

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000646

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple way of synthesizing carbon nanoscrolls is demonstrated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations show that graphene sheets can fully self-scroll around carbon nanotubes when the nanotube radius is larger than ≈10 Å, forming a core/shell structure. This method could lead to the development of a broad new class of carbon/carbon core/shell-composite structures with enhanced properties.

    3. First-Layer Effect in Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 2020–2025)

      Xi Ling and Jin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000918

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) technique is used to fabricate mono- and multilayers and different molecular configurations on graphene (e.g., protoporphyrin IX, PPP). Raman measurements show that the first-layer LB film and groups in contact with graphene have a larger contribution to the Raman enhancement, and indicate that graphene-enhanced Raman scattering obeys a chemical-enhanced mechanism.

    4. Alkyl Passivation and Amphiphilic Polymer Coating of Silicon Nanocrystals for Diagnostic Imaging (pages 2026–2034)

      Colin M. Hessel, Michael R. Rasch, Jose L. Hueso, Brian W. Goodfellow, Vahid A. Akhavan, Priyaveena Puvanakrishnan, James W. Tunnel and Brian A. Korgel

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000825

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Luminescent silicon (Si) nanocrystals are formed from the thermolysis of hydrogen silsesquioxane and passivated with a dodecane monolayer via thermal hydrosilylation. The nanocrystals are rendered hydrophilic for biological imaging by coating with an amphiphilic polymer. The polymer-coated nanocrystals are imaged in biological tissue, highlighting the potential of Si nanocrystals for in vivo diagnostic imaging.

    5. Photocatalytic Activity of Protein-Conjugated CdS Nanoparticles (pages 2035–2040)

      Vidyalakshmi Rajendran, Anna König, Kersten S. Rabe and Christof M. Niemeyer

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000690

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Coating with proteins strongly affects the photocatalytic properties of CdS colloids. This observation is used to generate CdS–tobacco etch virus protease nanohybrids, which act as photocatalytic mediators to produce hydrogen peroxide to enable fatty acid hydroxylation by the enzyme CYP152A1.

    6. A Light-Activated Theranostic Nanoagent for Targeted Macrophage Ablation in Inflammatory Atherosclerosis (pages 2041–2049)

      Jason R. McCarthy, Ethan Korngold, Ralph Weissleder and Farouc A. Jaffer

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000596

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis and utility of a light-activated theranostic nanoagent for the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular disease is reported. These particles localize to inflammatory macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions and allow for the optical determination of agent uptake and subsequent phototoxic activation at spectrally distinct wavelengths.

    7. Transistors Formed from a Single Lithography Step Using Information Encoded in Topography (pages 2050–2057)

      Michael D. Dickey, Kasey J. Russell, Darren J. Lipomi, Venkatesh Narayanamurti and George M. Whitesides

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000554

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One-step electronics: This paper describes the use of a single layer of patterned resist, combined with shadow evaporation, to fabricate field-effect transistors. Ordinarily, lithography produces patterns derived from the 2D openings in the resist. The described approach uses the 3D topography of the film, combined with a series of angle-dependent, thin-film depositions, to define the components of transistors and the connections between transistors. This simple approach to fabrication proceeds without registration.

    8. Measurement of Local Si-Nanowire Growth Kinetics Using In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of Heated Cantilevers (pages 2058–2064)

      Christian Kallesøe, Cheng-Yen Wen, Kristian Mølhave, Peter Bøggild and Frances M. Ross

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902187

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Epitaxial nanowires can be nucleated and grown controllably on locally heated microcantilevers (see image) using in situ TEM. Measurements of the nanowire growth rates enable calibration of the cantilever-heater parameters used in finite-element models of cantilever heating profiles, useful for optimization of the design of devices requiring local growth.

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