Small

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 19

October 4, 2010

Volume 6, Issue 19

Pages 2071–2190

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Nanoparticle patterning: High-Resolution, Parallel Patterning of Nanoparticles via an Ion-Induced Focusing Mask (Small 19/2010)

      Sukbeom You, Kyuhee Han, Hyoungchul Kim, Heechul Lee, Chang Gyu Woo, Changui Jeong, Woongsik Nam and Mansoo Choi

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090063

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image shows a novel concept for high-resolution, parallel patterning of nanoparticles via an ion-induced focusing mask. Under the simultaneous injection of ions (yellow +'s) and charged nano-aerosols (white spheres with +'s), the ions deposit first on the dielectric surface of the mask due to their higher mobility, which generates an invisible electrostatic lens around each opening. Through this lens, the charged nanoparticles are convergently guided and deposited in a parallel fashion on the substrate with a feature much smaller than the opening due to the focusing capability. In addition to patterning material-independent nanoparticles (e.g., proteins) at high resolution into an ordered array on any surface regardless of its conductivity and fl exibility, this method is also capable of further increasing array density. For more information, please read the Full Paper “High-Resolution, Parallel Patterning of Nanoparticles via an Ion-Induced Focusing Mask” by M. Choi and coworkers, beginning on page 2146.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Nanoparticle “inks”: Rewritable and pH-Sensitive Micropatterns Based on Nanoparticle “Inks” (Small 19/2010)

      Dawei Wang, István Lagzi, Paul J. Wesson and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090064

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture features the wet stamping (WETS) technique, which uses metal nanoparticles as “dynamic inks” to print colored micropatterns. Color changes are due to the aggregation and dispersion of the particles and the electrodynamic coupling between their metal cores. The patterns can be erased by chemical means and can also act as pH sensors. For more information, please read the Communication “Rewritable and pH-Sensitive Micropatterns Based on Nanoparticle ‘Inks’” by B. A. Grzybowski and co-workers, beginning on page 2114.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 19/2010) (pages 2071–2076)

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090065

  4. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Nanosensors: Does Crystal Shape Matter? (pages 2077–2079)

      Aleksander Gurlo

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000680

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crystal morphology changes the gas sensing activity! A recent study by X. G. Han et al. evidences the crystal morphology influence on the sensing activity of metal oxides. The sensor response of SnO2 nanocrystals increases symbatly with increasing ratio of the high-energy {221} facets.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Group IV Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Properties, and Biological Applications (pages 2080–2098)

      Jiyang Fan and Paul K. Chu

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000543

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis, properties, and biological applications of group IV nanoparticles including silicon, diamond, silicon carbide, and germanium are summarized. They have superior innate biocompatibility, robust fluorescence with high quantum yield and without photobleaching or even without blinking, as well as unique mechanical, chemical, and physical properties that make them very promising novel toolkits for bioimaging and drug delivery.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. A Polymer-Based Nanopore-Integrated Microfluidic Device for Generating Stable Bilayer Lipid Membranes

      Ryuji Kawano, Toshihisa Osaki, Hirotaka Sasaki and Shoji Takeuchi

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A parylene nanpore was built into multichannel microfluidic devices and a single protein channel was reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) on the pore. Although BLMs on micropores used for channel recordings are usually too unstable for the exchange of solutions between the upper and lower sides, the BLMs formed in our nano­pores were stable enough to permit solution exchange.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. A Polymer-Based Nanopore-Integrated Microfluidic Device for Generating Stable Bilayer Lipid Membranes (pages 2100–2104)

      Ryuji Kawano, Toshihisa Osaki, Hirotaka Sasaki and Shoji Takeuchi

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000997

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A parylene nanpore was built into multichannel microfluidic devices and a single protein channel was reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) on the pore. Although BLMs on micropores used for channel recordings are usually too unstable for the exchange of solutions between the upper and lower sides, the BLMs formed in our nano­pores were stable enough to permit solution exchange.

    2. Lifting and Sorting of Charged Au Nanoparticles by Electrostatic Forces in Atomic Force Microscopy (pages 2105–2108)

      JiaPeng Xu, Kwang Joo Kwak, James L. Lee and Gunjan Agarwal

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000924

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new nanoparticle manipulation technique is demonstrated by application of electrostatic forces via the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. Gold nanoparticles with a specific surface charge or mass could be selectively lifted up from a substrate by controlling the potential applied to the AFM tip.

    3. Electrochemically Controlled Deconjugation and Delivery of Single Quantum Dots into the Nucleus of Living Cells (pages 2109–2113)

      Kyungsuk Yum, Ning Wang and Min-Feng Yu

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000855

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A membrane-penetrating nanoneedle (also serving as a nanoelectrode) is developed for carrying and rapidly releasing individual quantum dots into the nucleus of a living cell via an electrochemical reaction activated by an electrical pulse. Direct delivery of biological probes into the nucleus with high spatial and temporal precision offers new strategies for the study of biological activity in a living cell.

    4. Rewritable and pH-Sensitive Micropatterns Based on Nanoparticle “Inks” (pages 2114–2116)

      Dawei Wang, István Lagzi, Paul J. Wesson and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201001053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rewritable micropatterns based on nanoparticle “inks” are created in gel substrates by wet stamping. The colors of the patterns depend on pH, reflect the degree of nanoparticle aggregation, and can be written using acids and erased using bases. Micropatterns imprinted with salts are “permanent” but can change color upon pH changes; these patterns act as multiple-use pH sensors.

    5. Nanoscale Engineering and Optical Addressing of Single Spins in Diamond (pages 2117–2121)

      Sébastien Pezzagna, Dominik Wildanger, Paul Mazarov, Andreas D. Wieck, Yanko Sarov, Ivo Rangelow, Boris Naydenov, Fedor Jelezko, Stefan W. Hell and Jan Meijer

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000902

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The artificial creation of shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond with 25 nm lateral resolution is performed by collimated implantation of low-energy nitrogen ions. The electron spin associated to this defect is the most promising qubit for a scalable quantum computer working at room temperature. Individual optical addressing of two single centres separated by only 16 nm is demonstrated with stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy.

    6. Ordering and Printing Virus Arrays: A Straightforward Way to Functionalize Surfaces (pages 2122–2125)

      Anne Horn, Stephanie Hiltl, Andreas Fery and Alexander Böker

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000863

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Regular stripes of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMV) with variable line spacings (290 nm to 1 μm) are generated over large areas via printing prealigned TMVs from wrinkled poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrates onto flat substrates.

    7. Integration of a Close-Packed Quantum Dot Monolayer with a Photonic-Crystal Cavity Via Interfacial Self-Assembly and Transfer (pages 2126–2129)

      Shisheng Xiong, Xiaoyu Miao, Jeffrey Spencer, Constantine Khripin, Ting S. Luk and C. Jeffrey Brinker

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000897

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Interfacial self-assembly and transfer of a freestanding PbS/polymer superlattice monolayer is a new technique to integrate colloidal quantum dots with photonic crystal microcavities, achieving a Q factor of 8060. This technique enables large area integration of self-assembled nanostructures with inherently large area lithographically patterned substrates. The freestanding, highly ordered nanoparticle/polymer monolayer superlattices are mechanically robust, enabling transfer to arbitrary substrates, even with complex surface features. As such this general approach may be useful in integrating the burgeoning field of ‘bottom-up’ nanoparticle self-assembly with ‘top down’ lithography.

    8. Quantum-Dot-Encoded Silica Nanospheres for Nucleic Acid Hybridization (pages 2130–2134)

      Pramod P. Pillai, Stephanie Reisewitz, Hendrik Schroeder and Christof M. Niemeyer

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000949

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oligonucleotide-modified submicrometer-sized silica nanospheres that are color-encoded by embedded luminescent QDs and that can be further functionalized by DNA–protein conjugates are described. This approach provides a facile route to specifically encode and functionalize particles for biological and biomedical applications.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Intracellular Nanoparticle Coating Stability Determines Nanoparticle Diagnostics Efficacy and Cell Functionality

      Stefaan J. H. Soenen, Uwe Himmelreich, Nele Nuytten, Thomas R. Pisanic II, Aldo Ferrari and Marcel De Cuyper

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090067

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intracellular nanoparticle degradation affects cell functionality and inhibits MR signals. Four commonly used iron oxide nanoparticles show clear pH-dependent degradation, the extent of which is governed by the nature of the coating material. Lipid-coated particles provide the best resistance and display extensive intracellular clustering, which enhances MR contrast and increases the durability of the label.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Highlight
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Intracellular Nanoparticle Coating Stability Determines Nanoparticle Diagnostics Efficacy and Cell Functionality (pages 2136–2145)

      Stefaan J. H. Soenen, Uwe Himmelreich, Nele Nuytten, Thomas R. Pisanic II, Aldo Ferrari and Marcel De Cuyper

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000763

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intracellular nanoparticle degradation affects cell functionality and inhibits MR signals. Four commonly used iron oxide nanoparticles show clear pH-dependent degradation, the extent of which is governed by the nature of the coating material. Lipid-coated particles provide the best resistance and display extensive intracellular clustering, which enhances MR contrast and increases the durability of the label.

    2. High-Resolution, Parallel Patterning of Nanoparticles via an Ion-Induced Focusing Mask (pages 2146–2152)

      Sukbeom You, Kyuhee Han, Hyoungchul Kim, Heechul Lee, Chang Gyu Woo, Changui Jeong, Woongsik Nam and Mansoo Choi

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000892

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Material-independent nanoparticles including proteins can be patterned by ion-induced focusing to give an ordered array with reduced feature sizes on any surface regardless of the conductive, nonconductive, or flexible nature of the substrate. The array density can also be increased. Highly sensitive gas sensors based on nanoparticle patterns are fabricated.

    3. Spatially Controlled Amyloid Reactions Using Organic Electronics (pages 2153–2161)

      Erik O. Gabrielsson, Klas Tybrandt, Per Hammarström, Magnus Berggren and K. Peter R. Nilsson

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201001157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Amyloid aggregates are produced by delivery of H+ and Na+ to a solution containing a polypeptide using an organic electronic ion pump and detected using fluorescence microscopy and SEM. The obtained aggregates are spatially confined to the outlet of the ion pump, and their spread and morphology are controlled by the applied cation current.

    4. Capture and Culturing of Living Cells on Microstructured DNA Substrates (pages 2162–2168)

      Stephanie Reisewitz, Hendrik Schroeder, Nuria Tort, Katie A. Edwards, Antje J. Baeumner and Christof M. Niemeyer

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000776

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DNA-directed immobilization combined with a modular protein capture system enables arraying of living cells on solid substrates by static incubation and hydrodynamic flow processes. The adhered cells can be cultivated to form dense monolayers with lateral dimensions, determined by the DNA microstructure. This approach should be useful for cell biology studies, biomedical diagnostics, or drug screening.

    5. Oil Microsealing: A Robust Micro-compartmentalization Method for On-Chip Chemical and Biological Assays (pages 2169–2175)

      Ayako Yamada, Fanny Barbaud, Lucia Cinque, Li Wang, Qian Zeng, Yong Chen and Damien Baigl

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000507

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oil microsealing is a new way to distribute a sample solution into an array of independent sub-nanoliter micro-compartments that can be addressed using an external stimulus (e.g., light). This simple, robust, and cost-effective method does not involve any active elements such as pumps and valves nor the use of surfactant molecules. The method was applied for the generation of regular gene expression arrays, selective photobleaching, photopatterning of calcium concentration (see image), and cell cultures in independent microchambers.

    6. Anatase Mesoporous TiO2 Nanofibers with High Surface Area for Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 2176–2182)

      Wei Zhang, Rui Zhu, Lin Ke, Xizhe Liu, Bin Liu and Seeram Ramakrishna

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000759

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Efficiency to dye for: The fabrication of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (SDSCs) using D131 as the sensitizer, P3HT as the hole transporting material and electrospun mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers as the photoelectrode is reported. An energy conversion efficiency of 1.82% is observed for devices based on mesoporous nanofibers, which is over 3-fold improved as compared to that based on regular nanofibers.

    7. Construction of Cuprous Oxide Electrodes Composed of 2D Single-Crystalline Dendritic Nanosheets (pages 2183–2190)

      Ho Seong Jang, Suk Jun Kim and Kyoung-Shin Choi

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201001033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cu2O electrodes composed of 2D dendritic nanosheets are prepared via electrodeposition. Each sheet is a single crystal in nature and is grown parallel to {110} planes. The observed 2D growth is unusual for Cu2O with a cubic crystal structure. The anisotropic growth mechanism of these crystals is investigated along with their photoelectrochemical properties.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION