Small

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 8

April 23 2010

Volume 6, Issue 8

Pages 891–973

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Nanolithography: Small 8/2010

      Tae Hee Han, Taedong Ok, Jangbae Kim, Dong Ok Shin, Hyotcherl Ihee, Hee-Seung Lee and Sang Ouk Kim

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows an aromatic self-assembling peptide, N-Boc-protected triphenylalanine (Boc-FFF), inspired by a structural motif for the β-amyloid associated with Alzheimer's disease, spontaneously assembled into a highly crystalline and thermally stable hexagonal bionanosphere array during solvent evaporation. Taking advantage of the highly stable monolayer bionanosphere array masks, hexagonal metal nanoparticle arrays or embossed Si nanoposts are readily created by selective deposition or selective etching. This novel approach of “bionanosphere lithography” demonstrates a straightforward biomaterial-based nanolithography compatible with conventional device fabrication processes. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Bionanosphere Lithography via Hierarchical Peptide Self-Assembly of Aromatic Triphenylalanine” by H. S. Lee, S. O. Kim, et al., beginning on page 945.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Nanoparticles: Small 8/2010

      Anastasia Delattre, Stéphanie Pouget, Jean-François Jacquot, Yves Samson and Peter Reiss

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a Z-contrast high-resolution STEM image of a 16-nm FePt nanoparticle, acquired with a probe Cs-corrected FEI Titan on the Minatec nanocharacterization platform. Individual alternating Fe and Pt planes are visible, which are characteristic of the chemically ordered L10 phase presenting high magnetocrystalline anisotropy. In order to obtain this phase, the FePt nanoparticles – in the disordered fcc phase of low anisotropy after chemical synthesis – are subjected to thermal annealing. While coalescence is prevented by a matrix of micrometric salt particles during the heat treatment, the nanoparticles' surface ligands are destroyed. The addition of an aqueous solution of the amino acid cysteine to the crude salt/nanoparticle mixture enables the simultaneous dissolution of the salt particles and the colloidal stabilization of the annealed FePt nanoparticle trough electrostatic repulsion. For more information, please read the Communication “Stable Colloidal Solutions of High-Temperature-Annealed L10 FePt Nanoparticles” by P. Reiss et al., beginning on page 932. Image credits: A. Zarafshar, T. Leong, N. Bassik, J. Cho, and D. Gracias.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Contents: Small 8/2010 (pages 891–894)

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201090025

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Bacterial nanotubes

      Bacterial Nanofluidic Structures for Medicine and Engineering (pages 895–909)

      William R. Hesse, Kevin J. Freedman, Dong Kee Yi, Chi Won Ahn and MinJun Kim

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200901576

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bacteria provide scientists and engineers with a multitude of nanoscale structures that may be engineered, adapted, or used for inspiration to create new medical diagnostic techniques or therapies. This Review highlights recent advances in both nanopore technologies and emerging technologies that make use of bacterial nanotubes. In addition, synthetic techniques that have striking similarity to bacterial nanofluidics are discussed.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Helical nanotubes

      Preparation and Elastic Properties of Helical Nanotubes Obtained by Atomic Layer Deposition with Carbon Nanocoils as Templates (pages 910–914)

      Yong Qin, Yunseok Kim, Lianbing Zhang, Seung-Mo Lee, Ren Bin Yang, AnLian Pan, Klaus Mathwig, Marin Alexe, Ulrich Gösele and Mato Knez

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902159

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Helical oxide nanotubes prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) replicate the helical morphology of the carbonnanocoil templates. ALD is superior to other coating technologies for the high-curvature surfaces of the nanostructures in terms of conformality and thickness control. The helical nanotubes have much better elasticity than straight nanotubes.

    2. Nanocrystals

      Size-Tunable UV-Luminescent Silicon Nanocrystals (pages 915–921)

      Naoto Shirahata, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, Yoshio Sakka and Tohru Tsuruoka

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902236

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silicon quantum dots that emit light in the wavelength range of 300 to 450 nm are fabricated. Size-tunable UV luminescence is achieved by precise control of the diameter of the nanocrystals and complete surface passivation with alkoxy monolayers.

    3. Quantum dots

      CdTe, CdSe, and CdS Nanocrystals for Highly Efficient Regeneration of Nicotinamide Cofactor Under Visible Light (pages 922–926)

      Dong Heon Nam, Sahng Ha Lee and Chan Beum Park

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201000077

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      CdTe, CdSe, and CdS nanocrystals have a high capability to drive in situ photochemical regeneration of NADH under visible light (λ > 420 nm). In particular, CdTe nanocrystals exhibit a superior turnover frequency and number for NADH regeneration compared to other inorganic photosensitizers. This work shows that quantum dots are excellent candidates as light harvesting components that can photochemically boost enzymatic synthesis reactions critically requiring cofactors.

    4. Mechanical buckling

      In situ Nanomechanical Characterization of Single-Crystalline Boron Nanowires by Buckling (pages 927–931)

      Chia-Hung Lin, Hai Ni, Xinnan Wang, Ming Chang, Yuh J. Chao, Juti Rani Deka and Xiaodong Li

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902087

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanomechanical characterization of single-crystalline boron nanowires is carried out by buckling individual nanowires with a nanomanipulator inside a scanning electron microscope in situ. The buckling behavior is studied and the applied load curves analyzed. A general calibration procedure for precisely measuring the mechanical properties of nanowires is established.

    5. Nanoparticles

      Stable Colloidal Solutions of High-Temperature-Annealed L10 FePt Nanoparticles (pages 932–936)

      Anastasia Delattre, Stéphanie Pouget, Jean-François Jacquot, Yves Samson and Peter Reiss

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200901805

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stable colloidal solutions of NaCl-annealed FePt nanoparticles, showing room-temperature ferromagnetism, are obtained by adding an aqueous solution of cysteine molecules. The latter bind to the nanoparticles' surface during the salt dissolution and provide stabilization of the colloids by electrostatic repulsion

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Tissue engineering

      Interface-Directed Self-Assembly of Cell-Laden Microgels (pages 937–944)

      Behnam Zamanian, Mahdokht Masaeli, Jason W. Nichol, Masoud Khabiry, Matthew J. Hancock, Hojae Bae and Ali Khademhosseini

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902326

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Centimeter-scale cell-laden hydrogel sheets are created by the directed assembly of shape-controlled microgels followed by UV polymerization. A hierarchical assembly technique creates complex multigel building blocks, which are then assembled into gel sheets with precise spatial control over the cell distribution.

    2. Nanolithography

      Bionanosphere Lithography via Hierarchical Peptide Self-Assembly of Aromatic Triphenylalanine (pages 945–951)

      Tae Hee Han, Taedong Ok, Jangbae Kim, Dong Ok Shin, Hyotcherl Ihee, Hee-Seung Lee and Sang Ouk Kim

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bionanosphere lithography method based on hierarchical peptide self-assembly is presented. The N-(t-Boc)-terminated triphenylalanine is designed for spherical nanoassembly. This peptide hierarchically assembles into a hexagonal monolayer of bionanospheres upon solvent evaporation. Highly crystalline, thermally stable triphenylalanine assembly is successfully employed as lithographic mask for metal or silicon nanopatterning.

    3. Liposomes

      Liposome Destabilization by a 2,7-Diazapyrenium Derivative Through Formation of Transient Pores in the Lipid Bilayer (pages 952–959)

      Romina Zappacosta, Monica Semeraro, Massimo Baroncini, Serena Silvi, Massimiliano Aschi, Alberto Credi and Antonella Fontana

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902306

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Experimental and computational data indicate that DM-DAP2+, a fluorescent DNA intercalator that integrates hydrophobic and hydrophilic features, can destabilize the membrane of liposomes owing to its tendency to drag along water molecules, thereby favoring the formation of transient pores across the bilayer.

    4. Hybrid materials

      Co-operative Formation of Monolithic Tungsten Oxide–Polybenzylene Hybrids via Polymerization of Benzyl Alcohol and Study of the Catalytic Activity of the Tungsten Oxide Nanoparticles (pages 960–966)

      Inga Olliges-Stadler, Marta D. Rossell and Markus Niederberger

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Monolithic tungsten oxide–polybenzylene nanohybrids are obtained in one step from tungsten isopropoxide and benzyl alcohol. The tungsten oxide nanonanowires are not only able to quantitatively transform benzyl alcohol into polybenzylene but also to generally catalyze the polymerization of alcohols with an aryl methanol group.

    5. Electrokinetics

      Label-Free Attomolar Detection of Proteins Using Integrated Nanoelectronic and Electrokinetic Devices (pages 967–973)

      Jian-Ru Gong

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.200902132

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Streaming dielectrophoresis and the corresponding electrostatic contribution to binding affinity after application of an AC electric field pushes the detection limit of an integrated nanoelectronic and electrokinetic device down to the attomolar level. The mechanism works for devices modified with an antibody for antigen detection and with cellular receptors for toxin screening.

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