Small

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 13

July 4, 2011

Volume 7, Issue 13

Pages 1721–1845

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Carbon Nanotubes: Electronic Interactions between “Pea” and “Pod”: The Case of Oligothiophenes Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes (Small 13/2011) (page 1721)

      Jia Gao, Pascal Blondeau, Patrizio Salice, Enzo Menna, Barbora Bártová, Cécile Hébert, Jens Leschner, Ute Kaiser, Matus Milko, Claudia Ambrosch-Draxl and Maria Antonietta Loi

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201190044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image shows oligothiophene molecules with different lengths (4, 5, and 6 thiophene units) diffusing inside a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). The encapsulation of a series of thiophene oligomers inside SWNTs is achieved through sublimation of the molecules at low pressure, giving rise to nanohybrids with tunable electronic structure and light emission in the visible range. The filling of the SWNTs is directly observed with aberration-corrected HRTEM, while time-dependent ACHRTEM images show the large mobility of the encapsulated molecules inside the SWNTs. The weak electronic interaction between the SWNTs and the oligothiophenes is apparent from optical spectroscopy and the elevated quantum yield. All findings are confi rmed by DFT calculations, which show how the electronic structure of the hybrid system depends on tube diameter and molecular length. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Electronic Interactions between ‘Pea’ and ‘Pod’: The Case of Oligothiophenes Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes” by E. Menna, C. Hébert, C. Ambrosch-Draxl, M. A. Loi, and co-workers, beginning on page 1807.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Hybrid Nanostructures: Dual Transport Systems Based on Hybrid Nanostructures of Microtubules and Actin Filaments (Small 13/2011) (page 1722)

      Dong Shin Choi, Kyung-Eun Byun and Seunghun Hong

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201190045

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover figure illustrates microtubule–actin filament hybrid nanostructures on either kinesin- or myosin-coated surfaces. Here, two different cytoskeletons, a microtubule and an actin filament, are conjugated together with the help of biotin–streptavidin bindings, resulting in the hybrid nanostructure, which can move on both kinesin- and myosin-coated surfaces. Although the hybrid nanostructure has a flexural rigidity value between those of microtubules and actin filaments, it moves like a microtubule when it is on kinesin and like an actin filament when on myosin. This implies that the characteristics of the hybrid nanostructure's motion are mainly determined by the underlying motor protein rather than the rigidity of the filaments. For more information, please read the Communication “Dual Transport Systems Based on Hybrid Nanostructures of Microtubules and Actin Filaments” by S. Hong and co-workers, beginning on page 1755.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 13/2011) (pages 1723–1727)

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201190046

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Fabrication of Advanced Particles and Particle-Based Materials Assisted by Droplet-Based Microfluidics (pages 1728–1754)

      Jing-Tao Wang, Juan Wang and Jun-Jie Han

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201001913

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Droplet-based microfluidic devices are powerful tools to generate emulsions and multiple-emusions, which are fine templates for fabricating advanced particles and particle-based materials. For instance, by further chemical or physical operations, multiple-emulsions can be used to synthesize microcapsules that can be applied for drug delivery systems. By evaporating the solvent, photonic crystals can be fabricated through the self-assembly of the colloidal particles suspended in the emulsion droplets.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Dual Transport Systems Based on Hybrid Nanostructures of Microtubules and Actin Filaments (pages 1755–1760)

      Dong Shin Choi, Kyung-Eun Byun and Seunghun Hong

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201002267

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microtubule–actin filament hybrid nanostructures are constructed with the help of biotin and streptavidin binding. The hybrid nanostructure exhibits motility on both kinesin- and myosin-coated surfaces. Trajectory analysis shows that the hybrid nanostructures move like microtubules when on kinesin and like actin filaments when on myosin.

    2. Lithographically Fabricated Optical Antennas with Gaps Well Below 10 nm (pages 1761–1766)

      Wenqi Zhu, Mohamad G. Banaee, Dongxing Wang, Yizhuo Chu and Kenneth B. Crozier

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100371

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pairs of nanoparticles separated by a controllable gap size that can be as small as 3 nm are fabricated via a top-down lithographic procedure. This fabrication method would be useful not only for surface-enhanced Raman scattering, where it could potentially enable single-molecule sensitivity, but also for other applications in plasmonics and nonlinear optics.

    3. Probing a Bifunctional Luminomagnetic Nanophosphor for Biological Applications: a Photoluminescence and Time-Resolved Spectroscopic Study (pages 1767–1773)

      Bipin Kumar Gupta, Vimal Rathee, Tharangattu N. Narayanan, Palanisamy Thanikaivelan, Avishek Saha, Govind, S. P. Singh, V. Shanker, Angel A. Marti and Pulickel M. Ajayan

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100441

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bifunctional luminomagnetic ≈30 nm Gd1-xEuxVO4 nanophosphor is synthesized using a facile sol–gel method. The nanophosphor is observed to produce both paramagnetic behavior and a highly efficient red emission peaking at 618 nm. Probing the luminomagnetic nanophosphor using photoluminescence, time-resolved spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, and a cytotoxicity assay reveal its suitability for biological applications, in particular, cell labeling and high-contrast imaging.

    4. CdTe Quantum Dots as Nanothermometers: Towards Highly Sensitive Thermal Imaging (pages 1774–1778)

      Laura M. Maestro, Carlos Jacinto, Ueslen R. Silva, Fiorenzo Vetrone, John A. Capobianco, Daniel Jaque and José García Solé

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201002377

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-resolution thermal sensing at the nanoscale with sensitivities below 0.25 °C is possible using ultra-small CdTe-based quantum dots with diameters close to 1 nm. The two-photon emission band of this material shows an unexpected thermally induced spectral shift.

    5. Fabrication of Hierarchically Porous Inorganic Nanofibers by a General Microemulsion Electrospinning Approach (pages 1779–1783)

      Hongyan Chen, Jiancheng Di, Nü Wang, Hua Dong, Jing Wu, Yong Zhao, Jihong Yu and Lei Jiang

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201002376

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultraporous inorganic oxide nanofibers are fabricated by a general microemulsion electrospinning approach. The stable microemulsion spinning solution comprises metal alkoxide as the consecutive phase and paraffin oil as the dispersion phase as well as pore-forming template. After calcination, inorganic nanofibers with well-controllable high porosity are obtained with a typical composite structure of mesopores and macropores.

    6. Synthesis of Periodically Structured Titania Nanotube Films and Their Potential for Photonic Applications (pages 1784–1789)

      Jia Lin, Kun Liu and Xianfeng Chen

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201002098

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Periodically structured titania nanotubes are designed and fabricated by current-pulse anodization to create 3D photonic crystal films operating at visible wavelengths, for photon manipulation. In contrast to previous studies, this method combines all the advantages of large-area, low-cost, transparent, flexible, and complete-bandgap materials.

    7. Selective Nanopatterning of Protein via Ion-Induced Focusing and its Application to Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (pages 1790–1794)

      Chang Gyu Woo, Hyuck Shin, Changui Jeong, Kimin Jun, Jungpyo Lee, Jung-Rok Lee, Heechul Lee, Sukbeom You, Youngsook Son and Mansoo Choi

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100543

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Protein micro/nanoarrays with selectivity can be fabricated in a parallel way through the ion-induced focusing of a charged aerosol form of the proteins. This method can also position protein nanoparticles onto the deep bottom surface within microchannels of a high aspect ratio. Particle trajectory calculations validate the experimental results. A new design of metal-enhanced fluorescence substrate is successfully demonstrated.

    8. DNA Origami-Templated Growth of Arbitrarily Shaped Metal Nanoparticles (pages 1795–1799)

      Robert Schreiber, Susanne Kempter, Stefan Holler, Verena Schüller, Daniel Schiffels, Stephanie S. Simmel, Philipp C. Nickels and Tim Liedl

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100465

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      3D DNA origami structures are employed to template 1.4 nm gold clusters into desired shapes. The gold clusters are further enlarged with gold ions from solution to form continuously metallized nanoparticles with controllable shapes and dimensions and narrow size distributions. This site-directed metallization constitutes a general and easy route to generate nanodonuts, nanorods, nanocuboids, and more complex structures with high yield and fidelity.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. SERS: Highly-Ordered, 3D Petal-Like Array for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (Small 13/2011) (page 1800)

      Chuang Qian, Chao Ni, Wenxuan Yu, Wengang Wu, Haiyang Mao, Yifei Wang and Jun Xu

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201190047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Despite the great potential of the application of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), the difficulty in fabricating suitable SERS substrates is still a challenge. Based on the self-assembly of silica nanoparticles, the image shows a highly ordered, 3D petallike arrayed structure that serves as a promising SERS substrate because of both its high reproducibility and enormous SERS enhancement. Such a novel structure is easily achieved by anisotropically etching a self-assembled bilayer of silica nanoparticles followed by metal deposition. The spatially average SERS enhancement factor is on the order of 5×107, and the local enhancement factor is much higher; both factors can be improved further by optimizing parameters. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Highly-Ordered, 3D Petal-Like Array for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering” by W. Wu and co-workers, beginning on page 1800.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Highly-Ordered, 3D Petal-Like Array for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 1801–1806)

      Chuang Qian, Chao Ni, Wenxuan Yu, Wengang Wu, Haiyang Mao, Yifei Wang and Jun Xu

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201002026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The enormous SERS enhancement of a novel substrate comprising a highly-ordered, 3D petal-like array is evidenced by numerical simulations and characterization experiments. The fabrication of the arrayed structure is also highly reproducible, making it a promising SERS substrate. Guidance for optimizing the structure further is also put forward.

    2. Electronic Interactions between “Pea” and “Pod”: The Case of Oligothiophenes Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes (pages 1807–1815)

      Jia Gao, Pascal Blondeau, Patrizio Salice, Enzo Menna, Barbora Bártová, Cécile Hébert, Jens Leschner, Ute Kaiser, Matus Milko, Claudia Ambrosch-Draxl and Maria Antonietta Loi

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100319

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanohybridswith tunable electronic structure and emission in the visible range are obtained by encapsulation of a series of oligothiophenes in single-walled carbon nanotubes. The electronic interaction between the oligothiophenes and the carbon-nanotube container are understood by means of several experimental techniques and density functional calculations.

    3. Synthesis of Biomolecule-Modified Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Targeted Hydrophobic Drug Delivery to Cancer Cells (pages 1816–1826)

      Daniel P. Ferris, Jie Lu, Chris Gothard, Rolando Yanes, Courtney R. Thomas, John-Carl Olsen, J. Fraser Stoddart, Fuyuhiko Tamanoi and Jeffrey I. Zink

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201002300

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluroscently labeled, biomolecule- targeted, mesoporous silica is synthesized. This material targets transferrin and RGD, and shows enhancement in hydrophobic drug delivery, allowing for an up to 10-fold increase in particle endocytosis, resulting in a large increase in cell death versus particles without modification.

    4. Ordered, Mesoporous Metal Phosphonate Materials with Microporous Crystalline Walls for Selective Separation Techniques (pages 1827–1837)

      Tian-Yi Ma, Hui Li, An-Na Tang and Zhong-Yong Yuan

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100389

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ordered hexagonal mesoporous metal (Ti, Zr, V, Al)-phosphonate materials with microporous crystalline walls are synthesized through a microwave-assisted procedure by using triblock copolymer F127 as the template. These materials are employed as the stationary phase in the open tubular capillary electrochromato­graphy technique for the separation of various substances including acidic, basic, and neutral compounds. They show good selectively and reproducibility.

    5. Water-Dependent Photonic Bandgap in Silica Artificial Opals (pages 1838–1845)

      Francisco Gallego-Gómez, Alvaro Blanco, Victor Canalejas-Tejero and Cefe López

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100184

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The photonic properties of artificial opals formed by silica spheres are directly affected by adsorbed water. The water content in a silica opal is reversibly modified by moderate heating and, by measuring the photonic bandgap changes in situ, the water distribution in the opal is inferred. This model predicts, at room temperature, a nonclose-packed fcc structure with about 50% of the interstitial water forming necks between nearest neighbor spheres, which are separated by 5% of their diameter.

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