Small

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 18

September 19, 2011

Volume 7, Issue 18

Pages 2541–2674

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Molecular Electronics: Large Array of Sub-10-nm Single-Grain Au Nanodots for use in Nanotechnology (Small 18/2011) (page 2541)

      Nicolas Clément, Gilles Patriarche, Kacem Smaali, François Vaurette, Katsuhiko Nishiguchi, David Troadec, Akira Fujiwara and Dominique Vuillaume

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201190065

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows an array of sub-10-nm single crystal Au nanodots fabricated by e-beam lithography and thermally annealed. Each nanodot corresponds to a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image with atomic resolution. Ferrocene molecules are assembled on top of these nanodots and observed with nanometric resolution using electron diffraction X-ray (EDX) and high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) TEM microscopy. Such an array can be used for molecular electronics or potentially for many other future applications in nanotechnology. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Large Array of Sub-10-nm Single-Grain Au Nanodots for use in Nanotechnology” by N. Clément and co-workers beginning on page 2607.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Nanoparticle-Aerogel Composites: Nanoparticle–Loaded Aerogels and Layered Aerogels Cast from Sol–Gel Mixtures (Small 18/2011) (page 2542)

      Jiwon Kim, Hideyuki Nakanishi, Johannes Pollanen, Stoyan Smoukov, William P. Halperin and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201190066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows aerogels, in which different layers are loaded with different metal nanoparticles (Au: red; Ag: orange; Pd: gray). The particles are functionalized with hydroxy-terminated alkane thiols and disperse well in sol–gel mixtures to give alcogels and, after supercritical drying, aerogels containing up to 90 wt% of nanoparticles. Layered or patterned nanoparticle–aerogel monoliths can be prepared by sequential casting or molding of the nanoparticle-containg sol–gels, and can find uses in directing multistep catalytic reactions. For more information, please read the Communication “Nanoparticle-Loaded Aerogels and Layered Aerogels Cast from Sol–Gel Mixtures” by B. A. Grzybowski and co-workers, beginning on page 2568.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 18/2011) (pages 2543–2548)

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201190067

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Engineered Multifunctional Nanocarriers for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapeutics (pages 2549–2567)

      Donglu Shi, Nicholas M. Bedford and Hoon-Sung Cho

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100436

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon-based and/or magnetic nanocarriers—multifunctional nanomaterial systems—have received much attention in early cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advances in the design and development of such nanocarriers, including in-vivo studies, are reviewed in this article. Recommendations for future research are also given.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Nanoparticle–Loaded Aerogels and Layered Aerogels Cast from Sol–Gel Mixtures (pages 2568–2572)

      Jiwon Kim, Hideyuki Nakanishi, Johannes Pollanen, Stoyan Smoukov, William P. Halperin and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100605

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag, or Pd) functionalized with hydroxy-terminated alkane thiols can be dispersed in sol–gel mixtures to give alcogels and, after supercritical drying, aerogels containing up to 90 wt% of nanoparticles. Layered or patterned nanoparticle/aerogel monoliths can be prepared by sequential casting or molding of the sol–gels.

    2. U-Shaped Switches for Optical Information Processing at the Nanoscale (pages 2573–2576)

      Ventsislav K. Valev, Alejandro V. Silhanek, Ben De Clercq, Werner Gillijns, Yogesh Jeyaram, Xuezhi Zheng, Vladimir Volskiy, Oleg A. Aktsipetrov, Guy A. E. Vandenbosch, Marcel Ameloot, Victor V. Moshchalkov and Thierry Verbiest

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100752

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Information is transmitted from a beam of light to the plasmonic outputs of U-shaped nanostructures via four distinct logical states, depending on the polarization of the incoming light. Upon coupling the output extremities of the U-shaped switches to plasmonic metamaterial waveguides, information could be channeled through an all-optical circuit.

    3. Paper-Based Piezoelectric Nanogenerators with High Thermal Stability (pages 2577–2580)

      Kwon-Ho Kim, Keun Young Lee, Ju-Seok Seo, Brijesh Kumar and Sang-Woo Kim

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100819

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Foldable and thermally stable piezoelectric nanogenerators based on cellulose paper are demonstrated. Piezoelectric ZnO nanorods were produced on cellulose paper substrates. The paper nanogenerators are shown to be electrically stable under external mechanical loads. Furthermore, they have superior charge scavenging performance even under thermally harsh conditions.

    4. Novel Fabrication of 2D and 3D Inverted Opals and their Application (pages 2581–2586)

      Jae Ah Lee, Son Tung Ha, Hong Kyoon Choi, Dong Ok Shin, Sang Ouk Kim, Sang Hyuk Im and O Ok Park

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100816

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The 2D and 3D inverted opal films constructed from 3D colloidal crystals can serve as templates for directing self-assembled nanostructures of polystyrene-block-polymethylmethacrylate (PS-b-PMMA) copolymers.

    5. Liquid–Liquid Interfacial Nanomolding (pages 2587–2592)

      Jun Haeng Lee, Yong Man Lee, Young Hun Kim, Jun Young Lee, Se-Jin Choi and Pil J. Yoo

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101043

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoscale interfaces that form between two immiscible liquids can be harnessed to create patterned nanoarray structures. Pattern formation is achieved with nanodrop effusion of an uncured prepolymer of polydimethylsiloxane by mechanically compressing the wrinkle-patterned mold, followed by UV-assisted molding of the nanodrops with a different prepolymer of poly(urethane acrylate), resulting in the formation of ordered nanohole arrays over a large area.

    6. A Novel Type of Carbon: The Synthesis of Patterned Co-block Carbon Nanofibers (pages 2593–2597)

      Ahmed Shaikjee and Neil J. Coville

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100356

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A co-block carbon nanofiber (CNF) is synthesized by using methylpropiolate and 2-pentyne. In order to achieve a patterned growth, the acetylenes are alternated, such that an A-B-A-B co-block CNF is produced. The distinct blocks are attributed to the type of acetylene used.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Graphene Metrology: Centimeter-Scale High-Resolution Metrology of Entire CVD-Grown Graphene Sheets (Small 18/2011) (page 2598)

      Jennifer Reiber Kyle, Ali Guvenc, Wei Wang, Maziar Ghazinejad, Jian Lin, Shirui Guo, Cengiz S. Ozkan and Mihrimah Ozkan

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201190068

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image shows the segmented fluorescence quenching microscopy image of a large-area graphene sample fabricated via chemical vapor deposition. This new metrology technique allows identification of graphene layers over a large area by utilizing the fact that graphene quenches fluorescence through resonant energy transfer. Fluorescence quenching is visualized by spin-coating a dye-polymer mixture over the graphene sample. Fluorescence quenching contrast is controlled by setting the dye layer thickness. For few-layer graphene characterization, a 30-nm-thick dye layer is used. Once the fluorescence image is collected, histogram-based segmentation is used to identify individual graphene layers. This metrology technique is well suited for many industrial applications.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    1. Centimeter-Scale High-Resolution Metrology of Entire CVD-Grown Graphene Sheets (pages 2599–2606)

      Jennifer Reiber Kyle, Ali Guvenc, Wei Wang, Maziar Ghazinejad, Jian Lin, Shirui Guo, Cengiz S. Ozkan and Mihrimah Ozkan

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100263

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A high-throughput metrology method for measuring the thickness and uniformity of entire large-area chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene sheets on arbitrary substrates is demonstrated. The method utilizes the quenching of fluorescence by graphene to increase the visibility of graphene on a glass substrate. Due to its repeatability and flexibility, this metrology technique is well suited to many industrial applications.

    2. Large Array of Sub-10-nm Single-Grain Au Nanodots for use in Nanotechnology (pages 2607–2613)

      Nicolas Clément, Gilles Patriarche, Kacem Smaali, François Vaurette, Katsuhiko Nishiguchi, David Troadec, Akira Fujiwara and Dominique Vuillaume

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100915

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A uniform array of single-grain Au nanodots, as small as 5–8 nm, can be formed on silicon using e-beam lithography. The as-fabricated nanodots are amorphous, and thermal annealing converts them to pure Au single crystals covered with a thin SiO2 layer. The extended uniform array of nanodots is used as a new test-bed for molecular electronic devices.

    3. One-Pot Synthesis of Near-Infrared Fluorescent Gold Clusters for Cellular Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (pages 2614–2620)

      Li Shang, Naghmeh Azadfar, Florian Stockmar, Winfried Send, Vanessa Trouillet, Michael Bruns, Dagmar Gerthsen and G. Ulrich Nienhaus

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100746

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorescent gold nanoclusters stabilized with the bidentate ligand dihydrolipoic acid have been synthesized with a facile one-pot strategy. The prepared gold clusters possess bright near-infrared fluorescence, ultrasmall size, and good biocompatibility. Moreover, their long fluorescence lifetime makes them attractive as biolabels in fluorescence lifetime imaging applications.

    4. Spray Deposition of Highly Transparent, Low-Resistance Networks of Silver Nanowires over Large Areas (pages 2621–2628)

      Vittorio Scardaci, Richard Coull, Philip E. Lyons, David Rickard and Jonathan N. Coleman

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100647

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanowire networks are promising candidates for use as transparent electrodes. Here spray casting of networks over large areas is described. When optimized, these networks display transparency of 90% for sheet resistance of 50 Ω □−1. The resistance of networks displaying 90% transparency is found to scale strongly with the network non-uniformity.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Spray Deposition of Highly Transparent, Low-Resistance Networks of Silver Nanowires over Large Areas

      Vol. 8, Issue 2, 173, Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012

    5. Ion Flow Crossing Over a Polyelectrolyte Diode on a Microfluidic Chip (pages 2629–2639)

      Ji-Hyung Han, Kwang Bok Kim, Je Hyun Bae, Beom Jin Kim, Chung Mu Kang, Hee Chan Kim and Taek Dong Chung

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100827

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The key evidences for the rectification mechanism of an aqueous ion diode based on polyelectrolytic plugs on a microfluidic chip are reported by monitoring the ion flow crossing over the junction. How hysteresis phenomena, exhibited through the nonlinear behavior of the polyelectrolyte diode, is affected by a variety of parameters (e.g., switching potential, scan rate, and electrolyte concentration) is also investigated.

    6. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Chitosan and Recombinant Biopolymers into Biomimetic Coatings with Multiple Stimuli-Responsive Properties (pages 2640–2649)

      Rui R. Costa, Catarina A. Custódio, Francisco J. Arias, José C. Rodríguez-Cabello and João F. Mano

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100875

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanostructured multilayered films of chitosan and an elastin-like recombinamer are constructed. The thin films are demonstrated to possess stimuli-responsive and cyclic wettability changes from moderately hydrophobic to superhydrophilic, accompanied by the formation of spherical “micelle-like” structures. The incorporation of arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) in the recombinamer sequence improved cell adhesion. These features make of this system a promising alternative to classical layer-by-layer films with smart nature and increased functionality.

    7. Insulin-Coated Gold Nanoparticles: A Plasmonic Device for Studying Metal–Protein Interactions (pages 2650–2660)

      Munish Chanana, Miguel A. Correa-Duarte and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100735

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Insulin-capped gold nanoparticles (Au@insulin NPs) are highly sensitive towards heavy metals. Au@insulin NPs disaggregate in the presence of various heavy metal ions, giving an optical response, which can be monitored by the naked eye. The sensitivity of the NPs towards different metal ions is dissimilar and depends on the properties of each metal ion, metal ion concentration, and time, representing a simple tool for studying fundamental metal–protein interactions.

    8. Controlled Collapse of High-Aspect-Ratio Nanostructures (pages 2661–2668)

      Huigao Duan, Joel K. W. Yang and Karl K. Berggren

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100892

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Random collapse is a common phenomenon in high-aspect-ratio (HAR) nanostructures. Methods to control such collapse by using capillary force during the evaporation–drying process are proposed. Controlled collapse is realized by introducing a slightly asymmetric cross section, curvature, and tilt to the nanostructures. With this technique, sub- 10-nm-gap arrays are fabricated from HAR structures.

    9. Functionally Decoupled Soft Lithography for Patterning Polymer Brushes (pages 2669–2674)

      Isaac W. Moran, John R. Ell and Kenneth R. Carter

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201100895

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer brushes of various functionality are grafted from initiator monolayers assembled on silicon wafers and patterned with easy soft Imprint nanolithography (ESINL) both prior to and subsequent to surface-initiated polymerization (SIP). Consequently, nanoscale patterns of functional matter can be generated by soft lithography irrespective of specific surface chemistry.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION