Small

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 10

May 21, 2012

Volume 8, Issue 10

Pages 1457–1621

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Self-Assembly: Liquid Crystal Order in Colloidal Suspensions of Spheroidal Particles by Direct Current Electric Field Assembly (Small 10/2012) (page 1457)

      Aayush A. Shah, Heekyoung Kang, Kevin L. Kohlstedt, Kyung Hyun Ahn, Sharon C. Glotzer, Charles W. Monroe and Michael J. Solomon

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290056

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture features the self-assembly of anisotropic colloidal particles, which can improve the fundamental understanding of crystallization and the glass transition as well as be applied for materials with advanced optical and mechanical properties. A DC electric field device is used to rapidly self-assemble spheroids. The main image depicts a suspension of colloidal spheroids subject to a DC electric field, which leads to the formation of a crystalline phase. The confocal microscopy (CLSM) image of one such structure is shown between the electrodes, and the upper left corner shows a 3D rendering of the assembly, as generated by image processing of CLSM results. The electric field device is overlaid on a scanning electron microscopy image of the disordered spheroids, and the background image is a larger-scale confocal microscopy image of an electric-field-induced assembly. For further information, please read the Full Paper “Liquid Crystal Order in Colloidal Suspensions of Spheroidal Particles” by M. J. Solomon and co-workers beginning on page 1551. Image credit: Benjamin Schultz, Mahesh Ganesan, and Aayush A. Shah.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Nanopatterning: Graphoepitaxy of Block-Copolymer Self-Assembly Integrated with Single-Step ZnO Nanoimprinting (Small 10/2012) (page 1458)

      Sarah Kim, Dong Ok Shin, Dae-Geun Choi, Jong-Ryul Jeong, Jeong Ho Mun, Yong-Biao Yang, Jaeup U. Kim, Sang Ouk Kim and Jun-Ho Jeong

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290057

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image features a highly efficient nanolithography technique with a minimal number of processing steps, integrating directed block-copolymer self-assembly with single-step ZnO nanoimprinting. Diverse shapes of the ZnO patterns are readily attainable by UV-assisted, single-step imprinting of sol–gel precursors. The ZnO provides high thermal stability and low line-edge roughness, both of which are crucial for further directed blockcopolymer assembly. According to the ZnO trench shape, various self-assembled nanoscale morphologies—such as surface-parallel nanocylinder arrays, hierarchical nanopatterns of surface-parallel and vertical cylinder arrays, and co-axial nano-ring arrays—can be formed in the graphoepitaxially assembled block-copolymer thin films. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Graphoepitaxy of Block-Copolymer Self-Assembly Integrated with Single-Step ZnO Nanoimprinting” by S. O. Kim, J.-H. Jeong, and co-workers, beginning on page 1563.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Small 10/2012)

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290058

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 10/2012) (pages 1459–1464)

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290055

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Structuration and Integration of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Surfaces and Devices (pages 1465–1491)

      Elena Bellido, Neus Domingo, Isaac Ojea-Jiménez and Daniel Ruiz-Molina

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101456

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      A detailed review of the experimental approaches followed for the structuration of magnetic nanoparticles on surfaces is presented. Special attention is given to understand the parameters that control self-assembly, including the use of biological templates. Finally, the implementation of all the knowledge previously gained is translated to the integration and implementation on sensors and devices.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Protein Oriented Ligation on Nanoparticles Exploiting O6-Alkylguanine-DNA Transferase (SNAP) Genetically Encoded Fusion (pages 1492–1497)

      Miriam Colombo, Serena Mazzucchelli, Josè Maria Montenegro, Elisabetta Galbiati, Fabio Corsi, Wolfgang J. Parak and Davide Prosperi

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102284

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      A bimodular genetic fusion comprising a delivery module (scFv) and a capture module (SNAP) is proposed as a novel strategy for the site-specific covalent conjugation of targeting peptides to nanoparticles. An scFv mutant selective for HER2 tumor antigen is chosen as the targeting ligand. SNAP-scFv is immobilized on magnetofluorescent nanoparticles and its targeting efficiency against HER2-positive cells is assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence.

    2. Helical and Tubular Lipid Microstructures that are Electroless-Coated with CoNiReP for Wireless Magnetic Manipulation (pages 1498–1502)

      Simone Schuerle, Salvador Pané, Eva Pellicer, Jordi Sort, Maria D. Baró and Bradley J. Nelson

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101821

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      Hybrid magnetic phospholipidic-based tubular and helical microagents are wirelessly manipulated by means of a 5-DOF electromagnetic system. Two different strategies are used to manipulate these nanostructures in simulated biologic capillaries. Tubules are pulled by applying magnetic field gradients and oriented by magnetic fields. Helices exhibit a cork-screw motion similar to the swimming strategy used by motile bacteria such as E. coli.

    3. Fano Resonance in (Gold Core)−(Dielectric Shell) Nanostructures without Symmetry Breaking (pages 1503–1509)

      Huanjun Chen, Lei Shao, Yat Cho Man, Chunmei Zhao, Jianfang Wang and Baocheng Yang

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200032

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A fano resonance is observed in highly symmetric nanostructures comprising Au nanosphere cores and dielectric shells. It arises from the interference between the narrow plasmon resonance of the Au nanosphere core and the broad scattering background of the dielectric shell. The Fano resonance behavior is dependent on the gap distance between the core and shell and the shell material.

    4. Metal Nanofibers with Highly Tunable Electrical and Magnetic Properties via Highly Loaded Water-Based Electrospinning (pages 1510–1514)

      Nathaniel S. Hansen, Daehwan Cho and Yong Lak Joo

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102087

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanofibers are synthesized by electrospinning highly loaded water-based precursor–polymer hybrid solutions followed by thermal treatment to control crystal structure. Electrical conductivity and magnetic coercivity, as shown, are tested displaying independent magnetic and electrical property control from coercive to superparamagnetic and resistive to near-bulk conductivity at room temperature.

    5. Cobalt-Doping-Induced Synthesis of Ceria Nanodisks and Their Significantly Enhanced Catalytic Activity (pages 1515–1520)

      Xiao-Hui Guo, Chao-Chao Mao, Ji Zhang, Jun Huang, Wa-Nv Wang, Yong-Hui Deng, Yao-Yu Wang, Yong Cao, Wei-Xin Huang and Shu-Hong Yu

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102179

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-quality cobalt-doped ceria nanostructures with triangular column, triangular slab, and disklike shapes are synthesized by tuning the doping amount of cobalt nitrate in a facile hydrothermal reaction. The cobalt-doped ceria nanodisks display significantly enhanced catalytic activity in CO oxidation due to exposed highly active crystal planes and the presence of numerous surface defects.

    6. 3D Nanofluidic Channels Shaped by Electron-Beam-Induced Etching (pages 1521–1526)

      John M. Perry, Zachary D. Harms and Stephen C. Jacobson

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102240

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      In-plane nanofluidic channels with 3D topography are fabricated. Nanochannel masters are written by electron beam lithography in SU-8 resist and shaped by electron-beam-induced etching (EBIE) with water as the precursor gas. Nanofunnel replicas cast from unmodified and EBIE-modified masters show that the funnel tip dimensions decrease from a 150-nm depth and 80-nm width to a 70-nm depth and 40-nm width.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Topotaxial Fabrication of Vertical AuxAg1–x Nanowire Arrays: Plasmon-Active in the Blue Region and Corrosion Resistant (pages 1527–1533)

      Hyoban Lee, Youngdong Yoo, Taejoon Kang, Juneho In, Min-Kyo Seo and Bongsoo Kim

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102576

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-crystalline AuxAg1–x nanowires (NWs) are synthesized by a topotaxial method using Ag vapor transport. Au0.5Ag0.5 NWs are more inert than Ag NWs to oxidation and have significant plasmonic activity in the blue wavelength region. They have strong surface- enhanced Raman scattering enhancement comparable to that of Ag NWs. The characteristics of Au0.5Ag0.5 NWs make them candidates for improved plasmonic devices.

    2. Incremental Growth of Short SWNT Arrays by Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (pages 1534–1542)

      Alexander A. Puretzky, David B. Geohegan, Jeremy J. Jackson, Sreekanth Pannala, Gyula Eres, Christopher M. Rouleau, Karren L. More, Norbert Thonnard and Jason D. Readle

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102173

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A pulsed CVD approach is demonstrated to grow short arrays of continuous single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in increments as small as 25 nm. The fast nucleation and growth kinetics and array height are measured in real-time within each subsecond gas pulse by time-resolved laser reflectivity.

    3. Mitochondria-Targeting Photoacoustic Therapy Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 1543–1550)

      Feifan Zhou, Shengnan Wu, Yi Yuan, Wei R. Chen and Da Xing

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101892

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mitochondria-targeting photoacoustic modality using unmodified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and pulse laser irradiation suppresses tumor growth by selectively destroying tumor tissue without causing epidermis injury, due to the higher mitochondrial transmembrane potential in cancerous cells than normal cells. A new photoacoustic method for cancer treatment is provided.

    4. Liquid Crystal Order in Colloidal Suspensions of Spheroidal Particles by Direct Current Electric Field Assembly (pages 1551–1562)

      Aayush A. Shah, Heekyoung Kang, Kevin L. Kohlstedt, Kyung Hyun Ahn, Sharon C. Glotzer, Charles W. Monroe and Michael J. Solomon

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102265

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rapid assembly of anisotropic colloidal particles is essential to create complex, uniform, and scalable crystal structures for applications. In this study, DC electric fields are used to accelerate the self-assembly process of spheroidal particles. The image shows confocal microscopy images and renderings from image processing of the field-induced 3D ordering. The assembly is shown to have high-quality orientational order and previously unobserved periodic and dense layered ordering.

    5. Graphoepitaxy of Block-Copolymer Self-Assembly Integrated with Single-Step ZnO Nanoimprinting (pages 1563–1569)

      Sarah Kim, Dong Ok Shin, Dae-Geun Choi, Jong-Ryul Jeong, Jeong Ho Mun, Yong-Biao Yang, Jaeup U. Kim, Sang Ouk Kim and Jun-Ho Jeong

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101960

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      ZnO topographic patterns with various pattern shapes formed by a single-step nanoimprinting process can serve as templates for graphoepitaxial block-copolymer assembly, generating complex hierarchical nanopatterns where surface-parallel and surface-perpendicular nanocylinder arrays are alternately arranged.

    6. Maskless Projection Lithography for the Fast and Flexible Generation of Grayscale Protein Patterns (pages 1570–1578)

      Ansgar Waldbaur, Björn Waterkotte, Katja Schmitz and Bastian E. Rapp

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A versatile device for the creation of grayscale protein patterns by photobleaching in a reproducible manner is developed. Filtered, collimated light is projected onto a digital mirror device, which is set according to a digital grayscale image. This image is demagnified and projected onto a substrate for the creation of protein patterns.

    7. In vivo Imaging and Biodistribution of Multimodal Polymeric Nanoparticles Delivered to the Optic Nerve (pages 1579–1589)

      James Harrison, Carole A. Bartlett, Gary Cowin, Philip K. Nicholls, Cameron W. Evans, Tristan D. Clemons, Bogdan Zdyrko, Igor A. Luzinov, Alan R. Harvey, K. Swaminathan Iyer, Sarah A. Dunlop and Melinda Fitzgerald

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102648

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      Whole animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence analyses demonstrate that poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) nanoparticles coated with polyethylenimine (PEI) and containing an MRI contrast agent (superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles) and fluorophore (rhodamine B), remain close to the site of injection into a partial injury of the optic nerve, which is a central nervous system white matter tract.

    8. Fabrication of Lipid Tubules with Embedded Quantum Dots by Membrane Tubulation Protein (pages 1590–1595)

      Masayoshi Tanaka, Kevin Critchley, Tadashi Matsunaga, Stephen D. Evans and Sarah S. Staniland

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102446

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      Membrane tubulation protein amphiphysin induces the assembly of 1D tubulated liposomes with functional nanoparticles, such as quantum dots, embedded within the lipid bilayer under ambient conditions. The functional lipid tubule is developed within 15 min at 37 °C, and shows high aspect ratio and stability for more than 20 h.

    9. Efficient Delivery of Antitumor Drug to the Nuclei of Tumor Cells by Amphiphilic Biodegradable Poly(L-Aspartic Acid-co-Lactic Acid)/DPPE Co-Polymer Nanoparticles (pages 1596–1606)

      Siyuan Han, Yuexian Liu, Xin Nie, Qing Xu, Fang Jiao, Wei Li, Yuliang Zhao, Yan Wu and Chunying Chen

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102280

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel amphiphilic biodegradable poly(aspartic acid (AA)-co-lactic acid (LA))/DPPE co-polymer is synthesized and used to prepare doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded nanoparticles for tumor therapy. These nanoparticles are prepared by double emulsion method and exhibit pH-responsive drug release profiles. It is of great interest that these poly(AA-co-LA)/DPPE nanoparticles can efficiently deliver a chemotherapy drug DOX into the nuclei specifically within tumor cells and show dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity.

    10. Reversible Hydrogenation and Bandgap Opening of Graphene and Graphite Surfaces Probed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (pages 1607–1613)

      Andres Castellanos-Gomez, Magdalena Wojtaszek, Arramel, Nikolaos Tombros and Bart J. van Wees

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101908

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effect of hydrogenation of graphene and graphite surfaces is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. An Ar/H2 plasma is used to chemically modify the surface of the samples, opening an energy bandgap of 0.4 eV. Moderate annealing is enough to close this bandgap and the samples can be hydrogenated again to yield a similar semiconducting behavior.

    11. Direct Gravure Printing of Silicon Nanowires Using Entropic Attraction Forces (pages 1614–1621)

      Jungmok Seo, Hyonik Lee, Seulah Lee, Tae Il Lee, Jae-Min Myoung and Taeyoon Lee

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102367

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel printing method for highly aligned nanowires that are self-assembled at pre-defined microstructures using hydrodynamic flow of solvent and entropic force fields is demonstrated. Si nanowires are successfully aligned and printed onto flexible substrate with high density and aligning accuracy without any additional treatments using direct gravure printing.

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