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Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 15

August 6, 2012

Volume 8, Issue 15

Pages 2289–2444

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Affinity Separation: M13 Bacteriophage-Activated Superparamagnetic Beads for Affinity Separation (Small 15/2012) (page 2289)

      Julien Muzard, Mark Platt and Gil U. Lee

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      M13 bacteriophage virons are immobilized on superparamagnetic beads by G. U. Lee and co-workers, either through the pIII proteins on the ends of the phages or by the pVIII proteins on the sides of the phages. These two immobilization schemes, shown in detail on page 2403, result in an end-on phage–superparamagnetic bead assembly or a monolayer of phage covering the superparamagnetic beads in a side-on orientation, respectively.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Fluorescence: Fluorescence in Nanobiotechnology: Sophisticated Fluorophores for Novel Applications (Small 15/2012) (page 2290)

      Benjamin Hötzer, Igor L. Medintz and Niko Hildebrandt

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290084

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows semiconductor quantum dots engaged in Förster resonance energy transfer with fluorophore-functionalized biomolecules. Multiple-color lifetime analysis of sophisticated systems and nanometer spatial resolution are some of the important advantages of fluorescence in nanobiotechnology, report N. Hildebrandt and co-workers. Have a look at this colorful world on page 2297 and discover the secrets of fluorescence in nanobiotechnology!

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. DNA–Gold Conjugates: Formation of 1D and 2D Gold Nanoparticle Arrays by Divalent DNA–Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates (Small 15/2012) (page 2445)

      Yuichi Ohya, Nozomi Miyoshi, Mirai Hashizume, Takuya Tamaki, Takeaki Uehara, Shoso Shingubara and Akinori Kuzuya

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tetragonal lattice-like 2D gold nanoparticle (AuNP) arrays are constructed by an assortment of Holliday junction-forming divalent DNA–AuNP conjugates by Y. Ohya and co-workers on page 2335. The divalent DNA–AuNP conjugate with a single-stranded DNA attached at diametrically opposed polar positions is prepared utilizing high replacement reactivity of the polar singularities of an AuNP coated with a self-assembled monolayer consisting of a binary mixture of hydrophilic thiol compounds.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Small 15/2012)

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290086

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 15/2012) (pages 2291–2296)

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290080

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Fluorescence in Nanobiotechnology: Sophisticated Fluorophores for Novel Applications (pages 2297–2326)

      Benjamin Hötzer, Igor L. Medintz and Niko Hildebrandt

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The analysis of sophisticated biomolecular systems and their use in artificial signal transduction networks requires multiplexing capability, extremely high sensitivity, and nanometric spatial resolution. All these requirements are fulfilled by choosing the adequate fluorophore from the versatile fluorescent toolbox. Have a look at this colorful world and discover the secrets of fluorescence in nanobiotechnology!

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Bioresponse to Nanotubes: Surface Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes Impacts the Growth and Expression of Water Channel Protein in Tomato Plants (Small 15/2012) (page 2327)

      Hector Villagarcia, Enkeleda Dervishi, Kanishka de Silva, Alexandru S. Biris and Mariya V. Khodakovskaya

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A tomato plant grows on medium supplemented with multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The correlations between the level of aggregation, the type of functional group on the surface of applied carbon nanotubes, plant growth performance and the expression of tomato water channel protein in the cell membranes of roots exposed to multi-walled carbon nanotubes are documented and discussed by A. S. Biris, M. V. Khodakovskaya, and co-workers.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Surface Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes Impacts the Growth and Expression of Water Channel Protein in Tomato Plants (pages 2328–2334)

      Hector Villagarcia, Enkeleda Dervishi, Kanishka de Silva, Alexandru S. Biris and Mariya V. Khodakovskaya

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102661

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Specific properties of carbon nanotubes, such as their level of agglomeration in the medium and their surface characteristics, can be critical for the physiological response of plants upon application of carbon nanotubes. The correlations among the level of aggregation, the type of functional group on the surface of the carbon nanotubes, and the growth performance of tomato plants are documented.

    2. Formation of 1D and 2D Gold Nanoparticle Arrays by Divalent DNA–Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates (pages 2335–2340)

      Yuichi Ohya, Nozomi Miyoshi, Mirai Hashizume, Takuya Tamaki, Takeaki Uehara, Shoso Shingubara and Akinori Kuzuya

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200092

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Divalent DNA–AuNP (gold nanoparticle) conjugates comprising two DNA strands at diametrically opposed positions are prepared. Highly linear 1D and tetragonal lattice-like 2D AuNP arrays are constructed using the conjugates and DNA assemblies based on T- and double-crossover motifs and the Holliday junction.

    3. Direct Binding of a Redox Protein for Single-Molecule Electron Transfer Measurements (pages 2341–2344)

      Eduardo A. Della Pia, J. Emyr Macdonald, Martin Elliott and D. Dafydd Jones

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102416

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      An electron transfer protein is engineered with two thiol groups introduced at different positions in the molecular structure to allow robust binding to two gold electrodes. Atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy single-molecule studies show that the engineered proteins: (1) bind to a gold electrode in defined orientation dictated by the thiol-pair utilised, and (2) have a higher conductance than the wild-type proteins indicating a more efficient electron transmission due to the strong gold–thiol contacts.

    4. Flake-Shell Capsules: Adjustable Inorganic Structures (pages 2345–2349)

      Qingmin Ji, Chunyan Guo, Xiaoyan Yu, Christopher J. Ochs, Jonathan P. Hill, Frank Caruso, Hiromoto Nakazawa and Katsuhiko Ariga

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200317

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      Structure-adjustable capsules are fabricated from inorganic components by using a self-template dissolution–regrowth mechanism to give flake-shell silica microcapsules. The capsules shrink under thermal stimulus and their structures can be adjusted by treatment at different pH values. Tuning of shell pore diameters leads to tailored drug release over prolonged periods.

    5. Nanostructuring of Thermoelectric Mg2Si via a Nonequilibrium Intermediate State (pages 2350–2355)

      Teruyuki Ikeda, Laura Haviez, Youli Li and G. Jeffrey Snyder

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200386

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      A new route to self-assembled nanocomposite thermoelectric materials is proposed. High-energy mechanical alloying brings materials into a nonequilibrium intermediate state, such as a solid solution with an extended solubility. The large driving force for the transformation to the equilibrium state leads to nanometer-scale microstructure formation, which is ideal for reducing lattice thermal conductivity.

    6. Fabrication of Microgel Particles with Complex Shape via Selective Polymerization of Aqueous Two-Phase Systems (pages 2356–2360)

      Shaohua Ma, Julian Thiele, Xin Liu, Yunpeng Bai, Chris Abell and Wilhelm T. S. Huck

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102715

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      Microgel particles are formed from aqueous-two-phase-system (ATPS) droplets in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices. The droplets consist of a dextran core and a photopolymerizable poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) shell. Upon UV exposure, the ATPS droplets undergo a shape-transformation yielding PEGDA microgel particles containing a socket.

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      Size and Shape of Nanoclusters: Single-Shot Imaging Approach (pages 2361–2364)

      Y. Han, D. S. He, Y. Liu, S. Xie, T. Tsukuda and Z. Y. Li

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102710

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A method of single-shot imaging via aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with high angle annular dark-field detector (STEM-HAADF) has been applied to size-selected gold model catalysts (Au25 and Au39) on hydroxyapatite. Through quantitative intensity analysis, the size, in terms of number of atoms as well as 3D shape of the clusters are obtained.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Physical Virology: Direct Measurement of Phage phi29 Stiffness Provides Evidence of Internal Pressure (Small 15/2012) (page 2365)

      Mercedes Hernando-Pérez, Roberto Miranda, María Aznar, José L. Carrascosa, Iwan A. T. Schaap, David Reguera and Pedro J. de Pablo

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290082

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A 3D AFM topography rendition of a phage phi29 (red) adsorbed on mica (blue) is shown by P. J. de Pablo and coworkers, where part of the viral DNA (yellow) has been ejected through the tail. The phi29 bacteriophage translocates part of its DNA into the host by releasing the elastic energy arising from the internal pressure created during the DNA-packing process. Pushing with the AFM tip on the phage enables the direct measurement of the stiffness to estimate its internal pressure, just as a tyre may be pressed with fingers.

  10. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Direct Measurement of Phage phi29 Stiffness Provides Evidence of Internal Pressure (pages 2366–2370)

      Mercedes Hernando-Pérez, Roberto Miranda, María Aznar, José L. Carrascosa, Iwan A. T. Schaap, David Reguera and Pedro J. de Pablo

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200664

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using AFM nanoindentation experiments, DNA-full phi29 phage capsids are shown to be stiffer than when empty. The presence of counterions softens full viruses in a reversible manner, indicating that pressure originates from the confined DNA. A finite element analysis of the experiments provides an estimate of the pressure of ∼40 atm inside the capsid, which is similar to theoretical predictions.

  11. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. The Effect of Thermal Oxidation on the Luminescence Properties of Nanostructured Silicon (pages 2371–2380)

      Lijia Liu and Tsun-Kong Sham

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200175

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      Luminescence properties of thermally oxidized silicon nanowires made via electroless chemical etching of lightly doped and heavily doped Si wafers and porous Si are investigated systematically. X-ray absorption spectroscopy, in combination with X-ray excited optical luminescence, reveals oxidized silicon nanostructures have three luminescence channels which belong to different defect centers formed during oxidation, and the luminescence can be controlled by alternating sample porosity and oxidation temperature.

    2. Merging High Doxorubicin Loading with Pronounced Magnetic Response and Bio-repellent Properties in Hybrid Drug Nanocarriers (pages 2381–2393)

      Aristides Bakandritsos, Aristeidis Papagiannopoulos, Eleni N. Anagnostou, Konstantinos Avgoustakis, Radek Zboril, Stergios Pispas, Jiri Tucek, Vasyl Ryukhtin, Nikolaos Bouropoulos, Argiris Kolokithas-Ntoukas, Theodore A. Steriotis, Uwe Keiderling and Frank Winnefeld

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102525

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      Hybrid drug nanocarriers simultaneously exhibit bio-repellent properties, pronounced magnetic response, high loading capacity of the potent anticancer drug doxorubicin, in a manner that has not been attained before. The nanocarriers are based on a magnetic core and a two-layer bi-functional polymeric corona constituted from a polycarboxylate backbone and poly(ethylene glycol) branches.

    3. Dimension-Controlled Synthesis of CdS Nanocrystals: From 0D Quantum Dots to 2D Nanoplates (pages 2394–2402)

      Jae Sung Son, Kunsu Park, Soon Gu Kwon, Jiwoong Yang, Moon Kee Choi, Junhyeong Kim, Jung Ho Yu, Jin Joo and Taeghwan Hyeon

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200506

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      Zero-, one-, and two-dimensional CdS nanocrystals are selectively synthesized via low-temperature reactions using alkylamines as surface-capping ligands. The 2D nanoplates have a uniform thickness as low as 1.2 nm. 2D nanostructures are generated by the 2D assembly of magic-sized CdS clusters formed at the nucleation stage, and subsequent attachment of the clusters.

    4. M13 Bacteriophage-Activated Superparamagnetic Beads for Affinity Separation (pages 2403–2411)

      Julien Muzard, Mark Platt and Gil U. Lee

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200099

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The M13 bacteriophage is assembled on superparamagnetic beads through the pIII proteins on the end of the viron or the pVIII proteins on the sides of the viron.

    5. A General Strategy for Self-Assembly of Nanosized Building Blocks on Liquid/Liquid Interfaces (pages 2412–2420)

      Jian-Wei Liu, Shao-Yi Zhang, Hao Qi, Wu-Cheng Wen and Shu-Hong Yu

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200172

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      A family of water/oil interfaces is introduced that provides effective platforms for rapid fabrication at room temperature of large-area self-assembled nanofilms composed of various nanosized building blocks, including nanoparticles, nanocubes, nanowires, and nanosheets. As a general interfacial assembly method, nanowires and nanoparticles can be co-assembled at the liquid/liquid interface.

    6. Conjugated Polymer and Gold Nanoparticle Co-loaded PLGA Nanocomposites with Eccentric Internal Nanostructure for Dual-modal Targeted Cellular Imaging (pages 2421–2429)

      Junlong Geng, Kai Li, Kan-Yi Pu, Dan Ding and Bin Liu

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102353

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      A one-step synthesis of an integrated nanocomposite with surface functional folic acid groups, as well as eccentrically loaded gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and conjugated polymer PFVBT, is reported. The nanocomposite shows far-red fluorescence from PFVBT and scattering signal from Au NPs, which allows for fluorescence and dark-field dual-modal targeted cellular imaging.

    7. A General Route to Efficient Functionalization of Silicon Quantum Dots for High-Performance Fluorescent Probes (pages 2430–2435)

      Jing Wang, Yuexian Liu, Fei Peng, Chunying Chen, Yonghong He, Hui Ma, Lixin Cao and Shuqing Sun

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102627

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) with different surface functionalities are efficiently prepared using a microwave-initiated hydrosilylation process. The as-prepared SiQDs are highly luminescent and show excellent dispersibility in selected solvents depending on the terminal group of the capping molecules, thus allowing wide applications including cell imaging.

    8. Resistive Pulse Sensing of Analyte-Induced Multicomponent Rod Aggregation Using Tunable Pores (pages 2436–2444)

      Mark Platt, Geoff R. Willmott and Gil U. Lee

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200058

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tunable nanopores are used to monitor individual and aggregated rod-shaped nanoparticles as they move through a membrane opening. By controlling the surface chemistry and the location of the capture ligand, rods are made to form either long end-on-end or wide side-on aggregates upon the addition of an analyte. The potential of the assay is demonstrated for platelet-derived growth factor at sensitivities down to femtomolar levels.

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