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Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 2

January 23, 2012

Volume 8, Issue 2

Pages 165–322

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Magnetically Enhanced Fluorescence: Signal Amplification by Magnetic Force on Polydiacetylene Supramolecules for Detection of Prostate Cancer (Small 2/2012) (page 165)

      Il Kyoung Kwon, Min Sun Song, Sang Ho Won, Seung Phill Choi, Moonil Kim and Sang Jun Sim

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a method for enhanced detection of prostate cancer on polydiacetylene (PDA) vesicle chips. External stimuli, including heat, solvents, mechanical force, pH, and ligand–receptor interactions, induce the perturbation of the PDA liposome backbone, which generates red fluorescence emission. Magnetic beads (shown as black) and a permanent magnet (under the chip) are used on the PDA vesicle chip to further enhance the red fluorescence. This strategy involves amplification of the fluorescent signal by combining the primary immune reaction of the antigen–antibody, the sandwich method of the polyclonal antibody-conjugated magnetic beads, and the amplification of the fluorescent signal due to the increased external mechanical pressure due to the magnetic attraction between the magnetic beads and permanent magnet. This strategy can be applied to general antibody-based PDA vesicle chips to detect clinically important biomarkers for disease diagnosis. For further information, please read the Communication “Signal Amplification by Magnetic Force on Polydiacetylene Supramolecules for Detection of Prostate Cancer” by S. J. Sim and co-workers, beginning on page 209.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Gold-Nanoparticle Sensors: Visualizing Human Telomerase Activity with Primer-Modified Au Nanoparticles (Small 2/2012) (page 166)

      Jiasi Wang, Li Wu, Jinsong Ren and Xiaogang Qu

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture features how human telomerase activity can be visualized using primer-modified Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Telomerase is over-expressed in over 85% of all known human tumors, making the enzyme a valuable biomarker for cancer diagnosis and an important therapeutic target. The working principle in the strategy featured here is based on elongated primers conjugated to a AuNP surface, which can fold into a G-quadruplex to protect the AuNPs from aggregation. This simple and sensitive colorimetric assay can measure telomerase activity down to 1 HeLa cell μL−1. More importantly, it can be easily extended to a high-throughput and automatic format. The method does not involve polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and therefore avoids amplification-related errors, making it reliable for the evaluation of telomerase activity. It is successfully used for the initial screening of telomerase inhibitors as anticancer drug agents. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Visualizing Human Telomerase Activity with Primer-Modified Au Nanoparticles” by X. Qu and co-workers, beginning on page 259.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Small 2/2012)

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290013

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 2/2012) (pages 167–172)

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290006

  5. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: Spray Deposition of Highly Transparent, Low-Resistance Networks of Silver Nanowires over Large Areas (page 173)

      Vittorio Scardaci, Richard Coull, Philip E. Lyons, David Rickard and Jonathan N. Coleman

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290010

      This article corrects:

      Spray Deposition of Highly Transparent, Low-Resistance Networks of Silver Nanowires over Large Areas

      Vol. 7, Issue 18, 2621–2628, Article first published online: 1 AUG 2011

    2. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: New Triblock Copolymer Templates, PEO-PB-PEO, for the Synthesis of Titania Films with Controlled Mesopore Size, Wall Thickness, and Bimodal Porosity (page 173)

      Erik Ortel, Anna Fischer, Laemthong Chuenchom, Jörg Polte, Franziska Emmerling, Bernd M. Smarsly and Ralph Kraehnert

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290012

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Chemiresistive Sensing with Chemically Modified Metal and Alloy Nanoparticles (pages 174–202)

      Francisco J. Ibañez and Francis P. Zamborini

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201002232

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      A material that changes resistance in the presence of gas and liquid analytes is termed a chemiresistor. A chemiresistive film of various dimensions comprises organic-modified nanoparticles where electron hopping occurs when a voltage (V) is applied. The current of the film changes over time in the presence of analytes in the gas- or liquid-phase (blue dots).

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Nanoparticle Arrays: Biotemplated Magnetic Nanoparticle Arrays (Small 2/2012) (page 203)

      Johanna M. Galloway, Jonathan P. Bramble, Andrea E. Rawlings, Gavin Burnell, Stephen D. Evans and Sarah S. Staniland

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria (Mms6) used to control both the formation and location of magnetic nanoparticles in a patterned array. Mms6 immobilized on a patterned surface templates high-quality, crystalline magnetite particles with a narrow grainsize distribution and consistent magnetic behavior under relatively mild conditions. These particles are ferrimagnetic and may be exchange-coupled on the surface, forming multiparticle attraction/repulsion zones. The biomineralization of nanomaterials in patterned arrays on surfaces using various specific proteins and peptides with templating ability could be used as a more environmentally friendly methodology to develop micro- and nanoscale devices.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Biotemplated Magnetic Nanoparticle Arrays (pages 204–208)

      Johanna M. Galloway, Jonathan P. Bramble, Andrea E. Rawlings, Gavin Burnell, Stephen D. Evans and Sarah S. Staniland

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101627

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Immobilized biomineralizing protein Mms6 templates the formation of uniform magnetite nanoparticles in situ when selectively patterned onto a surface. Magnetic force microscopy shows that the stable magnetite particles maintain their magnetic orientation at room temperature, and may be exchange coupled. This precision-mixed biomimetic/soft-lithography methodology offers great potential for the future of nanodevice fabrication.

    2. Signal Amplification by Magnetic Force on Polydiacetylene Supramolecules for Detection of Prostate Cancer (pages 209–213)

      Il Kyoung Kwon, Min Sun Song, Sang Ho Won, Seung Phill Choi, Moonil Kim and Sang Jun Sim

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101322

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A method in which a permanent magnet is introduced onto polydiacetylene (PDA) vesicle chips is introduced for enhancement of the fluorescence of PDA vesicles. This strategy can be applied to general antibody-based PDA vesicle chips to detect clinically important biomarkers for disease diagnosis.

    3. Silica-Modified Oligonucleotide−Gold Nanoparticle Conjugate Enables Closed-Tube Colorimetric Polymerase Chain Reaction (pages 214–219)

      Jacky K. F. Wong, Shea Ping Yip and Thomas M. H. Lee

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101925

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A facile silica coating significantly enhances the thermal stability and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) compatibility of oligonucleotide−gold nanoparticle conjugates, thus enabling colorimetric detection of PCR results in a closed-tube format. This method is specific, sensitive, and generally applicable. Its simplicity, visual readout, and carryover contamination-free features hold promise for point-of-care or on-site DNA testing.

    4. Controlling the Electrical Behavior of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes via Tube Contact (pages 220–224)

      Ana Paula M. Barboza, Sabrina S. Carara, Ronaldo J. C. Batista, Helio Chacham and Bernardo R. A. Neves

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101285

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      The electromechanical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in contact with different materials is investigated by scanning probe microscopy. An anomalous diamond/semiconducting nanotube behavior is observed, which is consistent with ab initio calculations: the formation of a broken-gap heterojunction between semiconducting SWNTs and a hydrogenated diamond surface results in a metallic response for such SWNTs.

    5. A Rational Self-Sacrificing Template Route to Metal–Organic Framework Nanotubes and Reversible Vapor-Phase Detection of Nitroaromatic Explosives (pages 225–230)

      Rui Li, Yu-Peng Yuan, Ling-Guang Qiu, Wang Zhang and Jun-Fa Zhu

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101699

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal–organic framework nanotubes (MOFNTs) are achieved by a strategy in which MOF nanorods formed initially act as a self-sacrificing template for the formation of the final MOFNTs. The fluorescent MOFNTs obtained exhibit high sensitivity, significant selectivity, and a fast response rate for the reversible vapor-phase detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

    6. Enrichment and Detection of Peptides from Biological Systems Using Designed Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Microspheres (pages 231–236)

      Kun Qian, Wenyi Gu, Pei Yuan, Fang Liu, Yunhua Wang, Michael Monteiro and Chengzhong Yu

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101770

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Periodic mesoporous organosilica microspheres (PMOMs) are designed with integrated structural features, including a cubic mesostructure, hydrophobic wall composition, a uniform pore size of ≈3 nm, and a spherical morphology in micrometers, all advantageous for size-selective and highly efficient enrichment of peptides from mixtures. Consequently, PMOMs can be used to capture peptides in a range of complex biological systems.

    7. Enhanced Nanoscale Imaging of Polymer Blends by Temperature-Controlled Selective Dissolution (pages 237–240)

      Bettina Friedel, Bruno Ehrler, Sven Hüttner and Neil C. Greenham

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101860

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoscale imaging on polymer blends is vital, especially in organic electronics. By using temperature-controlled selective dissolution, the 3D structure of a thin film becomes accessible without the expensive search for adequate orthogonal solvents. The method, which takes advantage of the temperature dependence of the solubility, is demonstrated to image P3HT:PCBM and P3HT:F8TBT photovoltaic blend films using atomic force and scanning electron microscopy.

    8. Charge Trapping by Self-Assembled Monolayers as the Origin of the Threshold Voltage Shift in Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 241–245)

      Fatemeh Gholamrezaie, Anne-Marije Andringa, W. S. Christian Roelofs, Alfred Neuhold, Martijn Kemerink, Paul W. M. Blom and Dago M. de Leeuw

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101467

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The threshold voltage is an important property of organic field-effect transistors. By applying a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the gate dielectric, the value can be tuned. After electrical characterization, the semiconductor is delaminated. The surface potentials of the revealed SAM perfectly agree with the threshold voltages, which demonstrate that the shift is not due to the dipolar contribution, but due to charge trapping by the SAM.

    9. Engineering “Hot” Nanoparticles for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering by Embedding Reporter Molecules in Metal Layers (pages 246–251)

      Yuhua Feng, Yong Wang, Hong Wang, Tao Chen, Yee Yan Tay, Lin Yao, Qingyu Yan, Shuzhou Li and Hongyu Chen

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102215

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ag is deposited on the surface of Au nanoparticles functionalized with 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA). Exceptionally strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals are observed from the resulting colloid. Using SERS as a tool, evidence is obtained for the embedding of MBA inside the nanoscale metal layer.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Blinking Dynamics: Photoluminenscence Blinking Dynamics of Colloidal Quantum Dots in the Presence of Controlled External Electron Traps (Small 2/2012) (page 252)

      Zhihua Xu and Mircea Cotlet

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A single-molecule spectroscopy study on colloidal quantum dots reveals the effect of the external charge trap on the photoluminescence blinking dynamics. The study uses a series of colloidal quantum-dot-bridge-fullerene dimers with varying bridge lengths where the fullerene moiety acts as a well-defined, well-positioned external electron trap. A single external electron trap is shown to be able to switch a quantum dot from having “telegraph-like”, two-state on/off blinking behavior into exhibiting quasi- continuous, multistate blinking. Additionally, charge transfer followed by charge recombination is found to be an important mechanism in determining the blinking behavior of isolated quantum dots.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigenda
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Photoluminenscence Blinking Dynamics of Colloidal Quantum Dots in the Presence of Controlled External Electron Traps (pages 253–258)

      Zhihua Xu and Mircea Cotlet

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101643

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effect of external charge traps on the photoluminescence blinking of colloidal quantum dots is investigated by single-molecule spectroscopy using a series of colloidal quantum dot-bridge-fullerene dimers with varying bridge lengths and with the fullerene moiety acting as a well-defined, well-positioned, external charge trap.

    2. Visualizing Human Telomerase Activity with Primer-Modified Au Nanoparticles (pages 259–264)

      Jiasi Wang, Li Wu, Jinsong Ren and Xiaogang Qu

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101938

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Human telomerase activity can be visualized using primer-modified Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). The principle is based on the elongated primers conjugated to the AuNP surface, which can fold into a G-quadruplex to protect the AuNPs from the aggregation. The sensitive colorimetric assay can measure telomerase activity at low levels and can be used for initial screening of telomerase inhibitors as anticancer drug agents.

    3. A Novel and Highly Efficient Photocatalyst Based on P25–Graphdiyne Nanocomposite (pages 265–271)

      Shuo Wang, Luoxin Yi, Jonathan E. Halpert, Xiaoyong Lai, Yuanyuan Liu, Hongbin Cao, Ranbo Yu, Dan Wang and Yuliang Li

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101686

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      Graphdiyne nanosheets are chemically bonded with titania nanoparticles (P25) by a facile hydrothermal treatment. The nanocomposite has a higher photocatalytic activity than P25–graphene. In the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB), graphdiyne acts as an acceptor of the photogenerated electrons.

    4. Flexible Field Emission from Thermally Welded Chemically Doped Graphene Thin Films (pages 272–280)

      Hee Jin Jeong, Hae Deuk Jeong, Ho Young Kim, Sung Hun Kim, Jun Suk Kim, Seung Yol Jeong, Joong Tark Han and Geon-Woong Lee

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101696

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      High-performance flexible field-emission devices employing strong reduced graphene oxide (RGO) emitters are fabricated by a simple thermal welding process followed by cohesive failure of the RGO thin film on the polymeric substrate. Chemical doping with n- and p-type dopants is a reliable and convenient method for modifying the work function and field-emission characteristics of the RGO emitters.

    5. In Vivo NIR Fluorescence Imaging, Biodistribution, and Toxicology of Photoluminescent Carbon Dots Produced from Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite (pages 281–290)

      Huiquan Tao, Kai Yang, Zhen Ma, Jianmei Wan, Youjiu Zhang, Zhenhui Kang and Zhuang Liu

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101706

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nearly identical carbon dot (Cdot) products are produced from various carbon starting materials by using a mixed-acid treatment. The Cdots exhibit strong yellow fluorescence under UV irradiation and shifted emission peaks as the excitation wavelength is changed. In vivo fluorescence imaging with the Cdots is demonstrated in mouse experiments, by using varied excitation wavelengths including some in the near-infrared (NIR) region. In vivo biodistribution and toxicology studies do not reveal any signs of toxicity for Cdots, suggesting their applicability to biomedical imaging.

    6. Delayed Photoelectron Transfer in Pt-Decorated CdS Nanorods under Hydrogen Generation Conditions (pages 291–297)

      Maximilian J. Berr, Aleksandar Vaneski, Christian Mauser, Stefan Fischbach, Andrei S. Susha, Andrey L. Rogach, Frank Jäckel and Jochen Feldmann

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101317

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      Photoelectron transfer to catalytically active Pt clusters on CdS nanorods is slower under hydrogen generation conditions (i.e., in the presence of hole scavengers) than in situations without significant hydrogen production (without hole scavengers). This surprising result is explained by different degrees of delocalization of the electronic wavefunction in the presence and absence of holes on the nanorod due to electron–hole Coulomb interactions.

    7. New Triblock Copolymer Templates, PEO-PB-PEO, for the Synthesis of Titania Films with Controlled Mesopore Size, Wall Thickness, and Bimodal Porosity (pages 298–309)

      Erik Ortel, Anna Fischer, Laemthong Chuenchom, Jörg Polte, Franziska Emmerling, Bernd Smarsly and Ralph Kraehnert

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101520

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis of a series of new triblock copolymer templates, PEO-PB-PEO, is reported along with their application for mesoporous oxide coatings. Micelles of the polymers template large mesopores in crystalline TiO2 films using either molecular (TiCl4) or nanocrystalline precursors (anatase nanoparticles). Pore size and thickness of pore walls can be controlled independently.

    8. Photoinduced Silver Nanoparticles/Nanorings on Plasmid DNA Scaffolds (pages 310–316)

      Jianhua Liu, Xiaoliang Zhang, Mei Yu, Songmei Li and Jindan Zhang

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101423

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      Toroidal plasmid DNA is separated from the Bacillus host and applied as sacrificial mold for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles and nanorings based on the photoirradiation method. The plasmid serves not only as a template but also as a reductant that drives silver nucleation and deposition on the plasmid.

    9. Electron-Induced Dynamics of Heptathioether β-Cyclodextrin Molecules (pages 317–322)

      Avijit Kumar, René Heimbuch, Kim S. Wimbush, Hasan Ateşçi, Adil Acun, David N. Reinhoudt, Aldrik H. Velders and Harold J. W. Zandvliet

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101484

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy on heptathioether β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) reveals the rich dynamics of the molecular assembly upon injection of inelastically tunneling electrons. These dynamics, evoked by excitations of the molecular vibrations of the macrocyclic β-CD molecule, are temperature independent, but increase with increasing tunneling current and sample bias. The results contribute to the understanding of charge transport in SAMs.

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