Small

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 24

December 21, 2012

Volume 8, Issue 24

Pages 3701–3856

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Upconversion: NIR-Triggered Release of Caged Nitric Oxide using Upconverting Nanostructured Materials (Small 24/2012) (page 3701)

      John V. Garcia, Jianping Yang, Dengke Shen, Chi Yao, Xiaoming Li, Rui Wang, Galen D. Stucky, Dongyuan Zhao, Peter C. Ford and Fan Zhang

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      NO is a key vasodilator in mammalian cardiovascular systems and has been shown to sensitize tissue to γ-radiation. However, photochemical NO precursors that can be activated by these NIR wavelengths are extremely limited. G. D. Stucky, D. Zhao, P. C. Ford, F. Zhang and co-workers have addressed this issue by utilizing the known NIR to visible upconversion properties of lanthanide-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals. This result, described on page 3800, is a potential game changer in multiphoton excitation-based therapeutic delivery of NO and other small molecule bioregulators to physiological targets.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. 3D Nanofabrication: 3D Nanofabrication of Fluidic Components by Corner Lithography (Small 24/2012) (page 3702)

      Erwin J. W. Berenschot, Narges Burouni, Bart Schurink, Joost W. van Honschoten, Remco G. P. Sanders, Roman Truckenmuller, Henri V. Jansen, Miko C. Elwenspoek, Aart A. van Apeldoorn and Niels R. Tas

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A pyramid microarray comprising microsized nanowires made by 3D corner lithography is presented by N. R. Tas and co-workers on page 3823. The arrays are integrated into a cell-seeding device for the entrapment of single cells. Polystyrene microspheres are shown efficiently captured from a suspension of homogeneously shaped spheres. The same procedure is done with a suspension of primary bovine chondrocytes, after which their phenotype is studied over 48 h. The magnified electron micrograph shows the efficient entrapment of 1 cell per pyramid after 2 h of cell culture. Cells maintain their native round morphology during entrapment, while the onset of protein deposition starts between these confined cells.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Serrs: Plasmonic Nanostructures for SERRS Multiplexed Identification of Tumor-Associated Antigens (Small 24/2012) (page 3860)

      Moreno Meneghetti, Alessia Scarsi, Lucio Litti, Gabriele Marcolongo, Vincenzo Amendola, Marina Gobbo, Marzia Di Chio, Anita Boscaini, Giulio Fracasso and Marco Colombatti

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290138

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold nanostructures, obtained by centrifugal aggregation of nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in solution, are functionalized with different SERRS reporters and with different associated antibodies by M. Meneghetti, M. Colombatti and co-workers on page 3733. Prostatic cancer cells expressing one of two antigens (PSMA or PSCA) or both are targeted by specific antibodies and are easily recognized in SERRS spectra of the reporters associated to the antibodies. The presence of both antigens is recognized on the same cell with only one spectrum, realizing SERRS multiplexing.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Small 24/2012)

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290139

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 24/2012) (pages 3703–3710)

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290133

  6. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Goes Solid (pages 3711–3713)

      Qichun Zhang and Xiaogang Liu

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201759

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Conventional dye-sensitized solar cells could potentially replace high-cost silicon-based solar cells, but the liquid electrolyte makes manufacture challenging. CsSnI3-based dye cells, constructed in solid-state form, pose a compelling solution.

  7. Correspondences

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Stripy Nanoparticles Revisited (pages 3714–3719)

      Yann Cesbron, Chris P. Shaw, James P. Birchall, Paul Free and Raphaël Lévy

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201001465

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stripes on gold nanoparticles were previously reported [Nature Materials, 3, 2004]. In subsequent articles, unusual physicochemical and biological properties were attributed to these particles. Here, the evidence supporting the existence of the stripy nanoparticles is critically revisited. Using simple geometrical arguments, fast-Fourier transform and experimental investigations, we conclude that the observed stripes are an imaging artifact.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Response to “Stripy Nanoparticles Revisited” (pages 3720–3726)

      Miao Yu and Francesco Stellacci

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202322

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a paper entitled “Stripy Nanoparticles Revisited”, Lévy and co-workers contest the interpretation of scanning tunneling microscopy images of monolayer protected gold nanoparticles that our group has presented. We show that the two arguments they use are based on flawed assumptions and contradict each other. We also show new evidence for the existence of stripe-like domains on mixed monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Graphene: Growing Suspended Graphene on C60 Molecules (Small 24/2012) (page 3727)

      Jiong Lu, Yi Zheng, Anastassia Sorkin and Kian Ping Loh

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290134

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The bending rigidity of graphene and inplane strain can de-pin the graphene from a substrate when it is grown over nanosized obstacles. Using high-temperature scanning tunneling microcopy, K. P. Loh and co-workers have made the unique discovery that C60 molecules absorbed on a Ru metal surface can at once act as growth precursors to graphene and suspension struts for the growing quasi-freestanding graphene on C60 molecules. The electronic structure of the C60-lifted graphene is distinct from that of the graphene attached to the metal substrate.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Growing Suspended Graphene on C60 Molecules (pages 3728–3732)

      Jiong Lu, Yi Zheng, Anastassia Sorkin and Kian Ping Loh

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201113

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The coverage- and temperature-dependent phases of C60 film on Ru are studied using STM. The slow decomposition of C60 molecules into carbon clusters overlaps with the fast crystallization of the clusters to form graphene, giving rise to a unique graphene-on-C60 structure. With further thermal activation, the decomposition of the buried C60 molecules transforms the intercalated structure into a bilayer graphene sheet.

    2. Plasmonic Nanostructures for SERRS Multiplexed Identification of Tumor-Associated Antigens (pages 3733–3738)

      Moreno Meneghetti, Alessia Scarsi, Lucio Litti, Gabriele Marcolongo, Vincenzo Amendola, Marina Gobbo, Marzia Di Chio, Anita Boscaini, Giulio Fracasso and Marco Colombatti

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201196

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold nanostructures obtained by laser ablation in solution are functionalized with antibodies for two tumor-associated antigens (PSMA and PSCA) overexpressed by prostate cancer cells and are incubated with cancer cells expressing one of the antigens, both or none. SERRS multiplexing measurements allow their identification and show a great targeting specificity.

    3. Field Emission from an Individual Freestanding Graphene Edge (pages 3739–3745)

      Jeff T. H. Tsai, Timothy Y. E. Chu, Jia-Yuan Shiu and Chu-Shou Yang

      Version of Record online: 21 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200880

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A freestanding graphene field emitter is prepared by quenching hot HOPG in a cold suspension, then manually loaded graphene on a metal probe. This single-layer graphene edge emits electrons from few atoms. Hence, this graphene probe (GP) is suitable for scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The GP (left) performs higher resolution than that of a conventional STM probe (right).

    4. High-Throughput Arrays for Rapid Characterization of Solution-Processable Transparent Conducting Electrodes (pages 3746–3751)

      Stephen Kustra, Haosheng Wu, Saurav Basu, Gustavo K. Rohde and Christopher J. Bettinger

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201330

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-throughput fabrication and characterization of nanomaterials represents an opportunity to discover optimal processing conditions for desired application-specific properties. Microfluidic devices used in combination with thermal annealing gradients produce high-throughput arrays of silver nanowire networks for screening optimal parameters in transparent conducting electrodes. A complementary technique to parallel characterization of nanowire network topology is also introduced.

    5. Room-Temperature Intercalation–Deintercalation Strategy Towards VO2(B) Single Layers with Atomic Thickness (pages 3752–3756)

      Liang Liu, Tao Yao, Xiaogang Tan, Qinghua Liu, Zhiqiang Wang, Dacheng Shen, Zhihu Sun, Shiqiang Wei and Yi Xie

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201552

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Exfoliation of layered bulk VO2(B) with strong covalent bonding by a convenient room-temperature intercalation-deintercalation strategy is proposed to obtain ultrathin sheets with atomic thickness of ∼0.62 nm. This VO2(B) single layer possesses a more symmetric atomic structure with slight lattice expansion that widens the band gap Energy by ΔEg = 0.19 eV, providing more possibilities for energy-level engineering in photovoltaics.

    6. Enhancing the Charge Transfer of the Counter Electrode in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using Periodically Aligned Platinum Nanocups (pages 3757–3761)

      Huisu Jeong, Yusin Pak, Youngkyu Hwang, Hui Song, Kwang Ho Lee, Heung Cho Ko and Gun Young Jung

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A periodically aligned Pt nanocup array is employed as a counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The Pt nanocup array enhances the catalytic area, which results in a greater fill factor (FF) and higher short-circuit current (Jsc). A higher density of nanocups is preferable for the performance of DSSCs.

    7. Directed Self-Assembly with Sub-100 Degrees Celsius Processing Temperature, Sub-10 Nanometer Resolution, and Sub-1 Minute Assembly Time (pages 3762–3768)

      Woon Ik Park, Kyungho Kim, Hyun-Ik Jang, Jae Won Jeong, Jong Min Kim, Jaesuk Choi, Jae Hong Park and Yeon Sik Jung

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201407

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synergetic combination of low-temperature thermal assistance with solvent annealing for the self-assembly of block copolymers with a large Flory-Huggins interaction parameter simultaneously achieves sub-10 nm resolution and sub-1 minute annealing time. It is shown that this method is applicable to different geometries of patterns such as nanoscale dots, lines, and holes.

    8. Protein-Protected Au Clusters as a New Class of Nanoscale Biosensor for Label-Free Fluorescence Detection of Proteases (pages 3769–3773)

      Yucai Wang, Yi Wang, Fengbo Zhou, Paul Kim and Younan Xia

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201983

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Destruction for detection: Protein-protected Au clusters are exploited as nanoscale sensors for label-free fluorescence detection of proteases with high sensitivity. The detection mechanism is based on degradation of the protein shell by a protease, allowing the O2 from ambient air to penetrate through and quench the fluorescence from the Au cluster.

  10. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Vapor Sensing: Organic Vapor Sensing Based on the Light Scattering Effect of Condensed Microdroplets (Small 24/2012) (page 3774)

      Haijuan Zhang, Xiaobo Wang and Jianmin Wu

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image illustrates a natural phenomenon of droplet formation caused by the condensation of vapor on a nonwettable surface at temperature below the dew point. Real-time observing the light scattered from the droplets may lead to a new mechanism for vapor sensing. However, the dew point of organic vapor in an air sample is usually far below room temperature. The problem has been solved by J. Wu and co-workers using porous silicon infiltrated with ionic liquids, on which the organic vapor can be condensed into microdroplets at a temperature far above the dew point. This finding, described on page 3775, leads to the creation of novel optical vapor sensor, which combines the light scattering effect of droplets with the sharp spectral features of pSi photonic crystal.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Organic Vapor Sensing Based on the Light Scattering Effect of Condensed Microdroplets (pages 3775–3780)

      Haijuan Zhang, Xiaobo Wang and Jianmin Wu

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significantly enhanced vapor condensation and formation of microdroplets occur on porous silicon (pSi) infiltrated with a high amount of ionic liquid. The resonant light reflected from the pSi rugate filter is scattered by the condensed microdroplets. Real-time vapor sensing is achieved by monitoring the decrease in the reflectance peak intensity with a fiber miniature spectrometer.

    2. Mechanical Frequency and Amplitude Modulation of a Quantum Cascade Laser Integrated with a Plasmonic Nanoantenna (pages 3781–3785)

      John Kohoutek, Dibyendu Dey, Alireza Bonakdar, Ryan Gelfand, Vala Fathipour, Omer Gokalp Memis and Hooman Mohseni

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200800

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antenna-integrated quantum cascade lasers are extremely attractive as a compact method to couple the vibrational resonances in the mid-infrared to nanometer-sized biomolecules in an integrated form. The high sensitivity of such devices to extreme sub-diffraction objects is demonstrated with a volume that is five orders of magnitude smaller than the cubic wavelength (λ3). This suggests a new method to sense objects with extreme sub-diffraction dimensions.

    3. Nanoporous Gold Channel with Attached DNA Nanolock for Drug Screening (pages 3786–3790)

      Jiandong Feng and Jianmin Wu

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201591

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Soft matter, easily deformed by weak interactions, can act as a sensing element based on stimuli-responsive conformational change. When combined with solid-state nanomaterials, the mechanical actuation is transformed into an optical or electrical signal. DNA molecules can control the pore accessibility of nanoporous gold, acting as a smart nanolock. Application in the screening of anticancer drugs is demonstrated.

    4. Parallel Dip-Pen Nanolithography using Spore- and Colloid-Terminated Cantilevers (pages 3791–3794)

      Marcus A. Kramer and Albena Ivanisevic

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200378

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Parallel dip-pen nanolithography is used to generate micrometer-scale patterns with protein and lipid dyes on both a glass surface and spore layer. Spore- and colloid-based tips are used to facilitate parallel patterning.

    5. Charge Stabilization of Superparamagnetic Colloids for High-Performance Responsive Photonic Structures (pages 3795–3799)

      Yongxing Hu, Le He and Yadong Yin

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201320

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By securing charged polymer ligands on the surface of superparamagnetic colloids with a layer of porous silica, a strong electrostatic interparticle repulsion with long-term stability can be established to balance the magnetically induced attraction and create 1D periodic chains that show magnetically responsive diffraction in the visible spectrum.

    6. NIR-Triggered Release of Caged Nitric Oxide using Upconverting Nanostructured Materials (pages 3800–3805)

      John V. Garcia, Jianping Yang, Dengke Shen, Chi Yao, Xiaoming Li, Rui Wang, Galen D. Stucky, Dongyuan Zhao, Peter C. Ford and Fan Zhang

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201213

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) mediate nitric oxide uncaging from Roussin's black salt anion Fe4S3(NO)7 using NIR light from a simple diode laser operating continuously at 980 nm. This result offers a new paradigm for applications of multi-photon absorption in the therapeutic delivery of NO.

    7. From Bare Metal Powders to Colloidally Stable TCO Dispersions and Transparent Nanoporous Conducting Metal Oxide Thin Films (pages 3806–3809)

      Engelbert Redel, Chen Huai, Ömer Dag, Srebri Petrov, Paul G. O'Brien, Michael G. Helander, Jacek Mlynarski and Geoffrey A. Ozin

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200864

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple, green, robust, widely applicable, multi-gram and cost-effective ‘one-pot’ synthesis of aqueous dispersions of colloidally stable 3–6 nm TCO NPs using bare metal powder precursors is described, and their utilization for making TCO high surface area nanoporous films is also demonstrated, which speaks well for their usage in a wide range of possible processes and devices.

    8. The Identification of Inner Tube Defects in Double-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (pages 3810–3815)

      Christopher S. Allen, Alex W. Robertson, Angus I. Kirkland and Jamie H. Warner

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201625

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with processing in Fourier space, images of the inner and outer tubes of double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are analysed. The chiral indices and relative atomic correlation of the component tubes of non-commensurate DWCNTs are determined and a defect in the inner tube of a (6, 6)@(18, 2) DWCNT is revealed.

  12. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Highlight
    8. Correspondences
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Full Papers
    1. Pd Nanosheet-Covered Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as a Platform for the Chemo-Photothermal Treatment of Cancer Cells (pages 3816–3822)

      Weijun Fang, Shaoheng Tang, Pengxin Liu, Xiaoliang Fang, Jiawei Gong and Nanfeng Zheng

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200962

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A smart Pd nanosheet-covered hollow mesoporous silica nanocomposite is developed for the combination of chemotherapy and phototherapy to cancer cells. The novel Pd nanosheets/mesoporous silica nanocomposites are demonstrated to be more effective in cancer treatment than chemotherapy or photothermal therapy alone, and exhibit a synergistic effect.

    2. 3D Nanofabrication of Fluidic Components by Corner Lithography (pages 3823–3831)

      Erwin J. W. Berenschot, Narges Burouni, Bart Schurink, Joost W. van Honschoten, Remco G. P. Sanders, Roman Truckenmuller, Henri V. Jansen, Miko C. Elwenspoek, Aart A. van Apeldoorn and Niels R. Tas

      Version of Record online: 21 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201446

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new technique for 3D nanofabrication is introduced and its application to the manufacturing of functional fluidic components is shown. One of the components is a 3D cell trapping device shown in the figure. The array of silicon nitride nanowire frames is created by conformal deposition and subsequent isotropic etching of silicon nitride in a mold containing sharp concave corners. This procedure is named corner lithography.

    3. Three-Dimensional Gold Nanoparticle Clusters with Tunable Cores Templated by a Viral Protein Scaffold (pages 3832–3838)

      Feng Li, Huiling Chen, Yejun Zhang, Zhong Chen, Zhi-Ping Zhang, Xian-En Zhang and Qiangbin Wang

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three-dimensional clusters of gold nanoparticles with a core nanoparticle at the center is assembled with the virus-based nanoparticle of simian virus 40 (SV40) as a template. The nanoparticle species in the core and the density of the gold nanoparticles on the shell can be easily tuned. The 3D hybrid nanoarchitectures provide interesting models for nanoparticle interaction studies and open new opportunities for integration of various functionalities in complex nanoarchitectures.

    4. Multi-Reservoir Bioadhesive Microdevices for Independent Rate-Controlled Delivery of Multiple Drugs (pages 3839–3846)

      Hariharasudhan D. Chirra and Tejal A. Desai

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201367

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photolithography and reactive ion etching is used to fabricate microdevices with multiple reservoirs for oral drug delivery. Results show that the asymmetric shape of the device enhances the permeation of drugs across the epithelial layer via unidirectional release. The multiple reservoirs prove advantageous for releasing the multiple drugs independently. Bioadhesion is provided by surface-functionalized lectin.

    5. Layer-by-Layer Coated Gold Nanoparticles: Size-Dependent Delivery of DNA into Cells (pages 3847–3856)

      Asmaa Elbakry, Eva-Christina Wurster, Alaa Zaky, Renate Liebl, Edith Schindler, Petra Bauer-Kreisel, Torsten Blunk, Reinhard Rachel, Achim Goepferich and Miriam Breunig

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles coated with poly(ethylene imine) and DNA in a layer-by-layer approach is explored. By tuning the size of the gold core, the number of nanoparticles and DNA molecules per cell can be controlled. Cytotoxicity studies show that poly(ethylene imine) can be applied at significantly higher concentration than its IC50 when bound to the nanoparticle surface.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION