Small

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 8

April 23, 2012

Volume 8, Issue 8

Pages 1121–1284

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Membranes: Direct Evidence of Lipid Rafts by in situ Atomic Force Microscopy (Small 8/2012) (page 1121)

      Mingjun Cai, Weidong Zhao, Xin Shang, Junguang Jiang, Hongbin Ji, Zhiyong Tang and Hongda Wang

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover image shows lipid rafts (green) in cell membranes (blue) as visualized by in situ atomic force microscopy. The lipid rafts from human erythrocytes are studied under physiological conditions at room temperature. The results indicate several important aspects of lipid rafts. Most of the lipid rafts are of irregular shapes in the size range of 100–300 nm. The detergent-resistant membranes consist of cholesterol microdomains, and are not likely the same as lipid rafts. Cholesterol contributes significantly to the formation and stability of protein domains, and Band III is determined to be an important protein of lipid rafts in erythrocyte membranes. This work provides direct evidence for the presence, size, and main constitutive protein of lipid rafts with a resolution down to a few nanometers. For more information, please read the Full Paper “Direct Evidence of Lipid Rafts by in situ Atomic Force Microscopy” by Z. Tang, H. Wang, and co-workers, beginning on page 1243.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Carbon Nanomaterials: Carbon Nanomaterials for Advanced Energy Conversion and Storage (Small 8/2012) (page 1122)

      Liming Dai, Dong Wook Chang, Jong-Beom Baek and Wen Lu

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture features carbon nanomaterials–carbon nanotubes and graphene–for applications in energy conversion and storage devices. Compared to conventional materials used for energy applications, carbon nanomaterials possess unique electrical and surface properties useful for efficient energy conversion and storage. Considerable efforts have been made to utilize carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, as energy materials, and tremendous progress has been achieved in developing high-performance energy conversion (e.g., solar cells and fuel cells) and storage (e.g., supercapacitors and batteries) devices. For more information please read the Review “Carbon Nanomaterials for Advanced Energy Conversion and Storage” by L. Dai, W. Lu, and co-workers, beginning on page 1130. The Review covers the progress from the last two decades in the research and development of carbon nanomaterials for advanced energy conversion and storage and discusses challenges and perspectives of this exciting field.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Small 8/2012)

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290049

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 8/2012) (pages 1123–1128)

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201290046

  5. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      A Novel Assay for Quantifying the Number of Plasmids Encapsulated by Polymer Nanoparticles (page 1129)

      Nupura S. Bhise, Ron B. Shmueli, Jose Gonzalez and Jordan J. Green*

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200500

      This article corrects:

      A Novel Assay for Quantifying the Number of Plasmids Encapsulated by Polymer Nanoparticles

      Vol. 8, Issue 3, 367–373, Article first published online: 5 DEC 2011

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Carbon Nanomaterials for Advanced Energy Conversion and Storage (pages 1130–1166)

      Liming Dai, Dong Wook Chang, Jong-Beom Baek and Wen Lu

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101594

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Progress in the research and development of carbon nanomaterials during the past twenty years or so is reviewed with reference to their use in advanced energy conversion and storage applications. Some discussion of the challenges and perspectives in this exciting field is also presented.

  7. Full Paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. One-Pot Synthesis of (Au Nanorod)–(Metal Sulfide) Core–Shell Nanostructures with Enhanced Gas-Sensing Property (pages 1167–1172)

      Haihua Wang, Zhenhua Sun, Qiuhong Lu, Fanwu Zeng and Dangsheng Su

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102287

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      (Au nanorod)–(metal sulfide) core–shell structures are synthesized by employing Au nanorods as the starting reactants and metal thiobenzoates as the metal sulfide precursors in the presence of Ag+ ions. The gas-sensing property of the prepared (Au nanorod)–CdS sensor exhibit a significantly enhanced response and higher sensitivity in comparison with a CdS sensor.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Uni-molecular Hollow Micelles from Amphiphilic Homopolymer Poly(2-(4-vinylphenyl)pyridine) (pages 1173–1179)

      Mohammad Changez, Nam-Goo Kang and Jae-Suk Lee

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102569

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Amphiphilic homopolymer poly(2-(4-vinylphenyl)pyridine) (PVPPy) forms hollow micelles with uni-molecular thickness in a tetrahydrofuran/water (95/5 v/v) azeotropic solvent. Depending on the pH of the media, the micelles may be transformed to vesicles.

    2. High-Efficiency and Room-Temperature Reduction of Graphene Oxide: A Facile Green Approach Towards Flexible Graphene Films (pages 1180–1184)

      Minghui Liang, Jie Wang, Bin Luo, Tengfei Qiu and Linjie Zhi

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101968

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel, green, and highly efficient strategy for room-temperature reduction of solid-state graphene oxide films has been successfully developed using hydrogen-involved reduction with the assistance of a small amount of Pd catalyst. Based on this approach, flexible reduced graphene oxide films with high conductivity can be achieved and a roll-to-roll technique is expected

      .

    3. Highly Permeable and Selective Pore-Spanning Biomimetic Membrane Embedded with Aquaporin Z (pages 1185–1190)

      Honglei Wang, Tai-Shung Chung, Yen Wah Tong, Kandiah Jeyaseelan, Arunmozhiarasi Armugam, Zaichun Chen, Minghui Hong and Wolfgang Meier

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102120

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A highly permeable yet highly selective pore-spanning biomimetic membrane embedded with aquaporin Z is molecularly designed and constructed via a combination of pressure-assisted vesicle adsorption and covalent-conjugation-driven vesicle fusion on a porous support. This approach represents a significant breakthrough in the architecture of biomimetic membranes embedded with aquaporin in a planar form.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Highly Permeable and Selective Pore-Spanning Biomimetic Membrane Embedded with Aquaporin Z

      Vol. 8, Issue 13, 1969, Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012

    4. Oriented Polythiophene Nanofibers Grown from CdTe Quantum Dot Surfaces (pages 1191–1196)

      Veronica Strong, Fernando J. Uribe-Romo, Micah Battson and Richard Kaner

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101983

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly crystalline, doped polythiophene is grown from the surfaces of CdTe quantum dots by ligand exchange of 3-thenoic acid followed by an oxidant-initiated polymerization. The facile synthesis generates a composite of highly ordered fibers, which exhibit efficient charge transfer between the polythiophene and the inorganic CdTe quantum dots.

    5. Characterization and Modeling of Breaking-Induced Spontaneous Nanoscale Periodic Stripes in Metallic Glasses (pages 1197–1203)

      Xing Xiang Xia and Wei Hua Wang

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101785

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stripes with a period of 87 nm appear in the mirror region of the fracture surface of metallic glasses. Two competing failure mechanisms of immediate meniscus instability and cavitation mechanism near the crack tip control the fracture process of metallic glasses and the formation process of nanostripes.

    6. ZnO Coaxial Nanorod Homojunction UV Light-Emitting Diodes Prepared by Aqueous Solution Method (pages 1204–1208)

      Xuan Sang Nguyen, Chuan Beng Tay, Eugene A. Fitzgerald and Soo Jin Chua

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102369

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The fabrication of a p-shell/n-core coaxial nanorod ZnO homojunction light-emitting diode by inexpensive solution method is demonstrated. The p-type conductivity of the ZnO shell arises from the incorporation of potassium while the n-type conductivity of the core is due to unintentional doping.

    7. Cell Alignment using Patterned Biocompatible Gold Nanoparticle Templates (pages 1209–1213)

      Chandramouleeswaran Subramani, Krishnendu Saha, Brian Creran, Avinash Bajaj, Daniel F. Moyano, Hao Wang and Vincent M. Rotello

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102405

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biocompatible structures are produced for cellular patterning. The biocompatible surfaces are generated to provide protein nonfouling patterns, offering direct communication to the cells for controlling cell adhesion and proliferation. These biofunctional surfaces provide a platform for aligning the cells in the direction of patterns, indicating potential application in the field of tissue engineering.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Microwave Absorption Enhancement of Multifunctional Composite Microspheres with Spinel Fe3O4 Cores and Anatase TiO2 Shells (pages 1214–1221)

      Jiwei Liu, Renchao Che, Huajun Chen, Fan Zhang, Feng Xia, Qingsong Wu and Min Wang

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102245

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microspheres with spinel Fe3O4 cores and anatase TiO2 shells are synthesized with different core sizes and shell thickneses. The as-synthesized microspheres have a unique morphology, uniform size, good crystallinity, favorable superparamagnetism, and high magnetization. The Fe3O4@TiO2 microspheres possess lower reflection loss and wider absorption frequency range than pure Fe3O4.

    2. Interactions of Gold Nanoparticles with the Interior of Hollow Graphitized Carbon Nanofibers (pages 1222–1228)

      Alessandro La Torre, Michael W. Fay, Graham A. Rance, Maria del Carmen Gimenez-Lopez, William A. Solomonsz, Paul D. Brown and Andrei N. Khlobystov

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Interactions of gold nanoparticles and hollow graphitized nanofibers reveal the first example of the controlled arrangement of nanoparticles inside carbon nano-containers. The ordering is directed by the graphitic step-edges in the nanofibers.

    3. Zipping Effect on Omniphobic Surfaces for Controlled Deposition of Minute Amounts of Fluid or Colloids (pages 1229–1236)

      Renaud Dufour, Philippe Brunet, Maxime Harnois, Rabah Boukherroub, Vincent Thomy and Vincent Senez

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101895

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Controlled deposition of picoliter-sized volumes is achieved using the receding motion of droplets on microstructured super-omniphobic surfaces. Zipping phenomena occurring along the receding contact-line rules the volume of these deposits. Beyond self-cleaning effects, this mechanism opens new perspectives for liquid-repellent surfaces, enabling passive, accurate, and targeted delivery of picoliter-sized samples for chemical or biological assays.

    4. Highly Efficient and Ultra-small Volume Separation by Pressure-Driven Liquid Chromatography in Extended Nanochannels (pages 1237–1242)

      Ryo Ishibashi, Kazuma Mawatari and Takehiko Kitamori

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102420

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pressure-driven liquid chromatography in a 200 nm deep, open-column channel enables separation of atto- to femtoliter sample volume, with a high separation efficiency of 440 000 plates/m within a few seconds. This high efficiency is due to the small and controlled size of the separation channel where the diffusion through the channel depth direction is fast enough to be neglected.

    5. Direct Evidence of Lipid Rafts by in situ Atomic Force Microscopy (pages 1243–1250)

      Mingjun Cai, Weidong Zhao, Xin Shang, Junguang Jiang, Hongbin Ji, Zhiyong Tang and Hongda Wang

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102183

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lipid rafts in human erythrocyte membranes are studied using high-resolution in situ atomic force microscopy. The results directly confirm the existence of lipid rafts in cell membranes. Most of the lipid rafts are in the size range of 100–300 nm and have irregular shapes.

    6. Hemocompatibility and Macrophage Response of Pristine and Functionalized Graphene (pages 1251–1263)

      Abhilash Sasidharan, Leela S. Panchakarla, Aparna R. Sadanandan, Anusha Ashokan, Parwathy Chandran, Chundayil Madathil Girish, Deepthy Menon, Shantikumar V. Nair, C. N. R. Rao and Manzoor Koyakutty

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201102393

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface functionalization reduces the toxicity of pristine graphene towards macrophage cells in vitro. Macrophages show relatively high intracellular uptake of functionalized, hydrophilic graphene compared to hydrophobic pristine graphene. The excellent compatibility of both types of graphene with human blood components is demonstrated.

    7. Multifrequency Imaging in the Intermittent Contact Mode of Atomic Force Microscopy: Beyond Phase Imaging (pages 1264–1269)

      Senli Guo, Santiago D. Solares, Vadym Mochalin, Ioannis Neitzel, Yury Gogotsi, Sergei V. Kalinin and Stephen Jesse

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101648

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Resonance frequency mapping of nanodiamond particles functionalized with octadecylamine on a mica substrate is carried out by generalized phase scanning probe microscopy (GP-SPM). The method is based on broad band detection and multi-eigenmode operation. Information on tip–surface interactions can be acquired by separating the response amplitude, instant resonance frequency, and quality factor.

    8. Toxicity and Cellular Uptake of Gold Nanorods in Vascular Endothelium and Smooth Muscles of Isolated Rat Blood Vessel: Importance of Surface Modification (pages 1270–1278)

      Alaaldin M. Alkilany, Alia Shatanawi, Timothy Kurtz, Ruth B. Caldwell and R. William Caldwell

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101948

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intravascular injection is the main route of nanoparticle administration. Little is known about the potential adverse effects of nanoparticles on blood vessels. Using gold nanorods with different surface chemistry and isolated rat aortic rings, the adverse effects of nanoparticles on blood vessels are evaluated as a function of their surface chemistry.

    9. Evidence for a Crucial Role Played by Oxygen Vacancies in LaMnO3 Resistive Switching Memories (pages 1279–1284)

      Zhong-tang Xu, Kui-juan Jin, Lin Gu, Yu-ling Jin, Chen Ge, Can Wang, Hai-zhong Guo, Hui-bin Lu, Rui-qiang Zhao and Guo-zhen Yang

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201101796

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aberration-corrected annular-bright-field imaging technique is employed to directly observe oxygen vacancies in LaMnO3 (LMO) films fabricated under various oxygen pressures. In combination with a numerical model, it is confirmed that the migration of oxygen vacancies at the Pt/LMO interface in Pt/LMO/SrTiO3:Nb (SNTO) devices dominates the resistive switching characteristics.

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