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Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 11

June 10, 2013

Volume 9, Issue 11

Pages 1869–2019

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
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      Supercapacitors: Flexible, Planar-Integrated, All-Solid-State Fiber Supercapacitors with an Enhanced Distributed-Capacitance Effect (Small 11/2013) (page 1869)

      Bin Liu, Dongsheng Tan, Xianfu Wang, Di Chen and Guozhen Shen

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      G. Z. Shen and co-workers present a novel design for a flexible planar-integrated all-solid-state fiber supercapacitor, including several ZnCo2O4 nanowire arrays/carbon fiber composite wire electrodes, a transparent/bendable PET substrate, and two Ag electrodes. The as-fabricated flexible device exhibits high efficiency, a long cycle life, and excellent electrical stability. The strategy presented on page 1998 enables highly flexible future supercapacitors with maximum functionality and minimized size, which may meet many potential applications such as wearable/stretchable displays, cardiac pacemakers, electronic paper, etc.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
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      Microfluidics: Force-Controlled Fluidic Injection into Single Cell Nuclei (Small 11/2013) (page 1870)

      Orane Guillaume-Gentil, Eva Potthoff, Dario Ossola, Pablo Dörig, Tomaso Zambelli and Julia A. Vorholt

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370061

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      Fluidic force microscopy for the injection of femtoliter volumes into single cell nuclei is described by T. Zambelli, J. A. Vorholt, and co-workers on page 1904. The pyramid of a microfluidic AFM cantilever is precisely inserted into the cell nucleus under force control, while a solution loaded in the probe is delivered to the nuclear compartment through the application of a pressure pulse. Efficient injection with simultaneous recording of cell indentation events, as well as tunable volume release, are demonstrated. Cell transformation by injection of plasmid DNA is validated by gfp expression.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
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      Masthead: (Small 11/2013)

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370062

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
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      Contents: (Small 11/2013) (pages 1871–1876)

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370063

  5. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
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      Chemical Imaging Beyond the Diffraction Limit: Experimental Validation of the PTIR Technique (page 1876)

      Basudev Lahiri, Glenn Holland and Andrea Centrone

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300884

      This article corrects:

      Chemical Imaging Beyond the Diffraction Limit: Experimental Validation of the PTIR Technique

      Vol. 9, Issue 3, 439–445, Article first published online: 4 OCT 2012

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. SnO2-Based Nanomaterials: Synthesis and Application in Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 1877–1893)

      Jun Song Chen and Xiong Wen (David) Lou

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202601

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      Tin dioxide (SnO2) is an attractive candidate as a high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries. In this review, a comprehensive discussion is provided about the synthesis of both phase-pure SnO2 and SnO2-based nanocomposites with different nanostructures ranging from 1D nanorods, to 2D nanosheets, to 3D hollow structures, and their application in high-performance lithium-ion batteries is discussed.

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
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      Surface Plasmons: Propagating and Localized Surface Plasmons in Hierarchical Metallic Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (Small 11/2013) (page 1894)

      Xinnan Wang, Yuyang Wang, Ming Cong, Haibo Li, Yuejiao Gu, John R. Lombardi, Shuping Xu and Weiqing Xu

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370064

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      A highly ordered hierarchical periodic structure with a large area is fabricated to support surface plasmon (SP) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This novel metallic submicro-nano structure described on page 1895 exhibits a complex honeycomb-like geometry, which is confirmed in experiments to support both PSPs and LSPs. Multiple modes of SPs are expected to have co-enhanced Raman scattering, heralding a further development of more sophisticated hybrid surface plasmonic nanodevices.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Propagating and Localized Surface Plasmons in Hierarchical Metallic Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 1895–1899)

      Xinnan Wang, Yuyang Wang, Ming Cong, Haibo Li, Yuejiao Gu, John R. Lombardi, Shuping Xu and Weiqing Xu

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202424

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A highly ordered hierarchical periodic structure with large area is fabricated to support surface plasmon (SP) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This novel metallic submicro-nano structure exhibits a complex honeycomb-like geometry, which is confirmed in experiments to support both PSPs and LSPs. Multiple modes of SPs are expected to have co-enhanced Raman scattering, heralding the development of more sophisticated hybrid surface plasmonic nanodevices.

    2. Electronic and Optical Vibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Transport Junctions Created by On-Wire Lithography (pages 1900–1903)

      Abrin L. Schmucker, Gokhan Barin, Keith A. Brown, Matthew Rycenga, Ali Coskun, Onur Buyukcakir, Kyle D. Osberg, J. Fraser Stoddart and Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201993

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      Raman spectroscsopy is used for studying molecular transport junctions (MTJs), but it cannot distinguish molecules participating in electrical transport from nearby inactive molecules. Here, on-wire lithography-generated nanostructures are used to study MTJs through inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy complemented by Raman spectroscopy to fingerprint the molecules participating in electrical conduction, while observation of host-guest interactions confirms their functionality.

    3. Force-Controlled Fluidic Injection into Single Cell Nuclei (pages 1904–1907)

      Orane Guillaume-Gentil, Eva Potthoff, Dario Ossola, Pablo Dörig, Tomaso Zambelli and Julia A. Vorholt

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202276

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      Surpassing the physical barriers of the cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes to deliver biomolecules directly into cell nuclei offers opportunities to investigate dynamic processes in living cells. The potential of atomic force microscopy coupled to microfluidics (FluidFM) for volume-controlled intranuclear delivery is demonstrated, whereby minimally invasive microchanneled probes are remotely driven with high spatiotemporal resolution.

    4. Multifunctional Semiconductor Nanoheterostructures via Site-Selective Silica Encapsulation (pages 1908–1915)

      Yang Xu, Jie Lian, Nimai Mishra and Yinthai Chan

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202096

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      Site-specific silica encapsulation of the CdSe core region of CdSe/CdS tetrapods is employed to allow for the fluorescence from the CdSe core to be preserved during the growth of secondary functional materials, which is exploited to achieve Ag2S-tipped SiO2-CdSe/CdS tetrapods with dual emission at visible and IR wavelengths and Au/FexOy-tipped SiO2-CdSe/CdS tetrapods which exhibits both fluorescence and a strong magnetic response.

    5. The pH Taxis of an Intelligent Catalytic Microbot (pages 1916–1920)

      Krishna Kanti Dey, Satyapriya Bhandari, Dipankar Bandyopadhyay, Saurabh Basu and Arun Chattopadhyay

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202312

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      A Pd nanoparticle-containing polymer microsphere moves with increasing speed across a pH gradient, following differential catalytic decomposition of aqueous hydrogen peroxide. The directional motion is akin to the pH taxis of living microorganisms. The artificial pH taxis exhibits random walk, translation, vertical, hopping, and pulsed motion, when the size of the motor and the imposed pH gradient are modulated.

    6. Graphene-Induced Adsorptive and Optical Artifacts During In Vitro Toxicology Assays (pages 1921–1927)

      Megan A. Creighton, J. Rene Rangel-Mendez, Jiaxing Huang, Agnes B. Kane and Robert H. Hurt

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202625

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      Graphene materials can deplete essential micronutrients from cell culture media and potentially interfere with probe dyes used during in vitro analysis of cell viability and function by (1) adsorbing dyes before they can interact with their target biomolecule, (2) quenching fluorescence after the interaction, and/or (3) absorbing or scattering light, which are issues for both colorimetric and fluorescent assays.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Upconversion: Red-Emitting Upconverting Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy in Cancer Cells Under Near-Infrared Excitation (Small 11/2013) (page 1928)

      Gan Tian, Wenlu Ren, Liang Yan, Shan Jian, Zhanjun Gu, Liangjun Zhou, Shan Jin, Wenyan Yin, Shoujian Li and Yuliang Zhao

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370065

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      A cooperative therapeutic system combining doxorubicin-induced chemotherapy and chlorine 6-triggered photodynamic therapy (PDT) based on upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) is designed on page 1929. In this system, the therapeutic efficacy is manageable since the doxorubicin release is sensitive to the environmental pH values and the PDT efficiency can be fine-tuned by the incident near-infrared irradiation. Importantly, the combinational therapeutic system exhibits a greatly enhanced efficacy relative to the individual cancer therapies.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Red-Emitting Upconverting Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy in Cancer Cells Under Near-Infrared Excitation (pages 1929–1938)

      Gan Tian, Wenlu Ren, Liang Yan, Shan Jian, Zhanjun Gu, Liangjun Zhou, Shan Jin, Wenyan Yin, Shoujian Li and Yuliang Zhao

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201437

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      Red-emitting upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) are investigated as a highly efficient 980-nm NIR photosensitizing nanoplatform for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The red emission band matches well with the efficient absorption bands of the commercial available photosensitizers, benefiting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer from UCNPs to the attached photosensitizers and thus efficiently activating them. In addition, a cooperative therapeutic UCNP-based system combining chemotherapy and PDT is constructed.

    2. Plasmonic Amplifiers: Engineering Giant Light Enhancements by Tuning Resonances in Multiscale Plasmonic Nanostructures (pages 1939–1946)

      Aiqing Chen, Ryan L. Miller, A. Eugene DePrince III, Alexandra Joshi-Imre, Elena Shevchenko, Leonidas E. Ocola, Stephen K. Gray, Ulrich Welp and Vitalii K. Vlasko-Vlasov

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202216

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      A new approach to the design of plasmonic structures is demonstrated for reliable giant light amplification based on components of different size and topology resonating at the same optical frequency. Using a silver mirror carrying surface plasmons, gratings forming distributed Bragg cavities, and gold nanoparticles supporting resonant Mie modes self-assembled in these templates, system resonances are tuned for the same wavelength and multiple enhancement of the light is achieved.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Plasmonic Amplifiers: Engineering Giant Light Enhancements by Tuning Resonances in Multiscale Plasmonic Nanostructures

      Vol. 9, Issue 22, 3734, Article first published online: 18 NOV 2013

    3. Plasmon-Mediated Synthesis of Silver Cubes with Unusual Twinning Structures Using Short Wavelength Excitation (pages 1947–1953)

      Michelle L. Personick, Mark R. Langille, Jian Zhang, Jinsong Wu, Shuyou Li and Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202451

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      A plasmon-mediated synthesis of twinned silver cubes using 450 nm excitation is reported. The cubes possess multiple twin boundaries arranged in either a parallel or intersecting orientation. In addition, the twin structure of the silver particles synthesized via this method can be controlled solely by varying the excitation wavelength to adjust reaction kinetics.

    4. Charge Transfer at Junctions of a Single Layer of Graphene and a Metallic Single Walled Carbon Nanotube (pages 1954–1963)

      Geraldine L. C. Paulus, Qing Hua Wang, Zachary W. Ulissi, Thomas P. McNicholas, Aravind Vijayaraghavan, Chih-Jen Shih, Zhong Jin and Michael S. Strano

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201034

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      A metallic single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) n-dopes a single layer of graphene that covers it, as evidenced by peak shifts in the Raman signal of both the graphene and the SWNT. The graphene directly on top of the SWNT has an additional 1.12 × 1013 electrons per cm2 compared to the graphene far away from the junction. A molecular dynamics simulation shows the SWNT being radially compressed by the graphene, however, this does not cause a shift in the SWNT Raman peaks, but rather an increase of their widths.

    5. Targeted Delivery of siRNA-Generating DNA Nanocassettes Using Multifunctional Nanoparticles (pages 1964–1973)

      Young-Seok Cho, Gee Young Lee, Hari Krishna Sajja, Weiping Qian, Zehong Cao, Weiling He, Prasanthi Karna, Xiaoyuan Chen, Hui Mao, Y. Andrew Wang and Lily Yang

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201973

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      A multifunctional siRNA delivery nanoparticle platform that combines the imaging capability of the nanoparticles with urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted delivery of siRNA-expressing DNA nanocassettes is developed. The ability to express siRNA from multiple nanocassettes conjugated to each nanoparticle following receptor-mediated internalization enhances the effect of gene silencing in tumor cells and in an animal tumor model.

    6. Mechanical Exfoliation and Characterization of Single- and Few-Layer Nanosheets of WSe2, TaS2, and TaSe2 (pages 1974–1981)

      Hai Li, Gang Lu, Yanlong Wang, Zongyou Yin, Chunxiao Cong, Qiyuan He, Lu Wang, Feng Ding, Ting Yu and Hua Zhang

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202919

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      A Raman microscope is employed to characterize 1L-5L WSe2 nanosheets and single crystals. A new peak around 308 cm−1 is observed. Red shifting of the A1g mode and the Raman peak around 308 cm−1 is observed from 1L-5L WSe2. Hexagonal- and monoclinic-structured WO3 thin films are obtained during the local oxidation of 1L-3L and 4L-5L WSe2 nanosheets.

    7. Enforcing Luminescence at Organic Nanointerfaces: Luminescence Spatial Confinement and Amplification in Molecular-Based Core–Shell Nanoparticles (pages 1982–1988)

      Elisa Campioli, Cédric Rouxel, Marco Campanini, Lucia Nasi, Mireille Blanchard-Desce and Francesca Terenziani

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202504

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      Fully organic bicomponent core–shell nanoparticles that promote efficient directional excitation energy transfer from the shell to the core are reported, with luminescence confinement at the nanointerface. A striking luminescence enhancement with respect to the corresponding single-component nanoparticles is observed and ascribed to large local electric fields generated at the nanointerface.

    8. Polyethylene Glycol and Polyethylenimine Dual-Functionalized Nano-Graphene Oxide for Photothermally Enhanced Gene Delivery (pages 1989–1997)

      Liangzhu Feng, Xianzhu Yang, Xiaoze Shi, Xiaofang Tan, Rui Peng, Jun Wang and Zhuang Liu

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202538

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      PEG and PEI dual-functionalized ultra-small graphene oxide (NGO-PEG-PEI) with excellent physiologial stability against salts and serum is explored as a gene delivery carrier, which exhibits superior gene transfection efficiency even in the presence of serum, as well as an exciting photothermally controlled gene therapy potential under mild NIR laser irradiation.

    9. Flexible, Planar-Integrated, All-Solid-State Fiber Supercapacitors with an Enhanced Distributed-Capacitance Effect (pages 1998–2004)

      Bin Liu, Dongsheng Tan, Xianfu Wang, Di Chen and Guozhen Shen

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202586

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By planar-integration of hierarchical ZnCo2O4 nanowire array/carbon fiber electrodes on a PET substrate, a new class of flexible all-solid-state planar-integrated fiber supercapacitors are designed with superior performances, including high-efficiency, enhanced capacity, and excellent electrochemical stability.

    10. High-Performance Photoelectrochemical-Type Self-Powered UV Photodetector Using Epitaxial TiO2/SnO2 Branched Heterojunction Nanostructure (pages 2005–2011)

      Xiaodong Li, Caitian Gao, Huigao Duan, Bingan Lu, Youqing Wang, Lulu Chen, Zhenxing Zhang, Xiaojun Pan and Erqing Xie

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202408

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      A TiO2/SnO2 branched heterojunction nanostructure with TiO2 branches on electrospun SnO2 nanofiber networks is synthesized, which serves as a model architecture for efficient self-powered UV photodetector based on photoelectrochemical cell. The fast response, high responsivity, and good photosensitivity linearity combined with its low cost, environmentally friendly nature, and the facile manufacturing process, make this new type of UV photodetector suitable for practical applications.

    11. Eccentric Loading of Fluorogen with Aggregation-Induced Emission in PLGA Matrix Increases Nanoparticle Fluorescence Quantum Yield for Targeted Cellular Imaging (pages 2012–2019)

      Junlong Geng, Kai Li, Wei Qin, Lin Ma, Gagik G. Gurzadyan, Ben Zhong Tang and Bin Liu

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202505

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      A simple strategy to control the location of fluorogens with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics in poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles is developed by changing the concentration of emulsifier, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The AIE fluorogens eccentrically loaded PLGA nanoparticles show a high quantum yield of 34%, good biocompatibility, and a far-red/near infrared fluorescence signature in aqueous conditions, which are ideal for cellular imaging.

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