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Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 19

October 11, 2013

Volume 9, Issue 19

Pages 3185–3360

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Flexible Electronics: Highly Flexible and Transparent Multilayer MoS2 Transistors with Graphene Electrodes (Small 19/2013) (page 3185)

      Jongwon Yoon, Woojin Park, Ga-Yeong Bae, Yonghun Kim, Hun Soo Jang, Yujun Hyun, Sung Kwan Lim, Yung Ho Kahng, Woong-Ki Hong, Byoung Hun Lee and Heung Cho Ko

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A highly flexible and transparent transistor based on an exfoliated MoS2 channel and CVD-grown graphene electrodes is reported by W.-K. Hong, H. C. Ko, and co-workers on page 3295. Introducing 2D nanomaterials provides high mechanical flexibility (available bending radius: ± 2.2 mm), optical transmittance (74%), and high current on/off ratio (>104) with an average field effect mobility of ≈4.7 cm2 V−1 s−1, all of which cannot be achieved by other transistors consisting of a MoS2 active channel/metal electrodes or graphene channel/graphene electrodes. In particular, the MoS2/graphene interface has a low Schottky barrier of ≈22 meV, which is comparable to the MoS2/metal interface.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Nanodot Gradients: Large Dynamic Range Digital Nanodot Gradients of Biomolecules Made by Low-Cost Nanocontact Printing for Cell Haptotaxis (Small 19/2013) (page 3186)

      Sébastien G. Ricoult, Mateu Pla-Roca, Roozbeh Safavieh, G. Monserratt Lopez-Ayon, Peter Grütter, Timothy E. Kennedy and David Juncker

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370113

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      D. Juncker and co-workers report on page 3308 a rapid and low-cost lift-off nanocontact printing process to pattern proteins onto surfaces with 100-nm resolution, and using a novel algorithm, create digital nanodot gradients (DNGs) with an unprecedented dynamic range of 3.2 orders of magnitude. Cell adhesion and directed migration on DNGs are observed, indicating that they may be used for quantitative cell biological studies.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Quantum Dots: NIR-Emitting Quantum Dot-Encoded Microbeads through Membrane Emulsification for Multiplexed Immunoassays (Small 19/2013) (page 3364)

      Xiebing Wang, Gang Wang, Wanwan Li, Bingxia Zhao, Bin Xing, Yuankui Leng, Hongjing Dou, Kang Sun, Lisong Shen, Xiangliang Yuan, Jiyu Li, Kun Sun, Junsong Han, Huasheng Xiao, Yue Li, Peng Huang and Xiaoyuan Chen

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370114

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      A detection platform combining NIR emitting CdSeTe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot (QD)-encoded microbeads and flow cytometry with a 488 nm laser is described on page 3327 by W. Li, K. Sun, X. Chen, and co-workers. This platform is used to conduct a 2-plex hybridization assay for hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis Be antigen and a 3-plex hybridization assay for hepatitis B surface antibody, hepatitis Be antibody and hepatitis B core antibody, which suggests the promising application of NIR QDencoded microbeads for multiplexed immunoassays.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Small 19/2013)

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370115

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Small 19/2013) (pages 3187–3194)

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370116

  6. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Response to “Critical Growth Temperature of Aqueous CdTe Quantum Dots is Non-negligible for their Application as Nanothermometers” (pages 3198–3200)

      Laura Martinez Maestro, Carlos Jacinto, Ueslen Rocha Silva, Fiorenzo Vetrone, John A. Capobianco, Daniel Jaque and José García Solé

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300569

  7. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Opportunities in High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy (pages 3201–3211)

      Benjamin P. Brown, Loren Picco, Mervyn J. Miles and Charl F. J. Faul

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201203223

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      Developments in instrumentation for “high-speed AFM” (HSAFM) have been ongoing since the 1990s, and now nanometer resolution imaging and lithography at video rate is readily achievable. This review provides a summary of different approaches to and advances in the development of high-speed AFMs, highlights important discoveries made with new instruments, and discusses new possibilities for HSAFM in materials science.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Upconversion: Tunable Near Infrared to Ultraviolet Upconversion Luminescence Enhancement in (α-NaYF4:Yb,Tm)/CaF2 Core/Shell Nanoparticles for In situ Real-time Recorded Biocompatible Photoactivation (Small 19/2013) (page 3212)

      Jie Shen, Guanying Chen, Tymish Y. Ohulchanskyy, Samuel J. Kesseli, Steven Buchholz, Zhipeng Li, Paras N. Prasad and Gang Han

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370117

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      Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) can convert tissue-penetrable nearinfrared light into UV emission, making them promising as transducers for photoactivation in biology. However, the choice of the UV emitting UCNPs is limited and their NIR-to-UV efficiency is low. G. Han and co-workers have addressed this issue by developing a family of CaF2-coated UCNPs with tunable UV enhancement. As reported on page 3213, such design outperforms known optimal UCNPs and in situ realtime live-cell photoactivation is recorded for the first time with such nanoparticles. This result is a potential game changer in photoactivation in living systems and a new tool for other biophotonic applications.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Tunable Near Infrared to Ultraviolet Upconversion Luminescence Enhancement in (α-NaYF4:Yb,Tm)/CaF2 Core/Shell Nanoparticles for In situ Real-time Recorded Biocompatible Photoactivation (pages 3213–3217)

      Jie Shen, Guanying Chen, Tymish Y. Ohulchanskyy, Samuel J. Kesseli, Steven Buchholz, Zhipeng Li, Paras N. Prasad and Gang Han

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300234

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      A family of upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) with a tunable UV enhancement is developed via a facile approach. The design leads to a maximum 9-fold enhancement in comparison with known optimal β-phase core/shell UCNPs in water. A highly effective and rapid in situ real-time live-cell photoactivation is recorded for the first time with such nanoparticles.

    2. Bottom-up Synthesis of Nanoscale Conjugation-Interrupted Frameworks and Their Electrical Properties (pages 3218–3223)

      Yong-Zheng Chang, Qi Shao, Lin-Yi Bai, Chang-Jin Ou, Jin-Yi Lin, Ling-Hai Xie, Zheng-Dong Liu, Xiaodong Chen, Guang-Wei Zhang and Wei Huang

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300065

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      Soluble covalent organic nanoframeworks up to generation 2.5 (G2.5) are synthesized with self-similar H-shaped conformations by using a bottom-up approach including iterative C–H bond functionalization. The electrical characteristics of nanoscale thin-film semiconductors of the conjugation-interrupted frameworks can be tuned by post-modification with diazonium salt.

    3. Mechanized Silica Nanoparticles Based on Pillar[5]arenes for On-Command Cargo Release (pages 3224–3229)

      Yu-Long Sun, Ying-Wei Yang, Dai-Xiong Chen, Guan Wang, Yue Zhou, Chun-Yu Wang and J. Fraser Stoddart

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300445

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      Mechanized silica nanoparticles, equipped with pillar[5]arene-[2]pseudorotaxane nanovalves, operate in biological media to trap cargos within their nanopores, but release them when the pH is lowered or a competitive binding agent is added. Although cargo size plays an important role in cargo loading, cargo charge-type does not appear to have any significant influence on the amount of cargo loading or its release. These findings open up the possibility of using pillar[n]arene and its derivatives for the formation of robust and dynamic nanosystems that are capable of performing useful functions.

    4. A Tunable Spherical Cap Microfluidic Electrically Small Antenna (pages 3230–3234)

      Magnus Jobs, Klas Hjort, Anders Rydberg and Zhigang Wu

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300070

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      A highly efficient microfluidic 3D electrically small antenna is created using a simple fabrication technique. It is easy to construct simply by pneumatically inflating a planar microfluidic antenna into a spherical cap. It has premium performance around its hemispherical shape, combining a wide working band with high efficiency.

    5. PEGylated Upconverting Luminescent Hollow Nanospheres for Drug Delivery and In Vivo Imaging (pages 3235–3241)

      Liang Dong, Duo An, Ming Gong, Yang Lu, Huai-Ling Gao, Yun-Jun Xu and Shu-Hong Yu

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300433

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      Upconversion luminescent hollow Y2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ nanospheres can be synthesized by an etching-free process, which hold promising potential for applications such as drug delivery, angiography, and high-contrast cellular as well as tissue imaging, with no damage from radiation or toxicity.

    6. Surface Matters: Enhanced Bactericidal Property of Core–Shell Ag–Fe2O3 Nanostructures to Their Heteromer Counterparts from One-Pot Synthesis (pages 3242–3246)

      Yingjie Chen, Nan Gao and Jiang Jiang

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300543

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      A facile one-pot synthesis of Ag@Fe2O3 core–shell and Ag–Fe2O3 heteromer nanoparticles is developed, and the core–shell nanoparticles show superior antibacterial properties compared to their heteromer counterparts and plain Ag nanoparticles. The mechanism for the increased efficiency is proposed to be due to the enhanced Ag ion release from the iron oxide shell-protected pristine Ag surface.

    7. Twisted Bi-Layer Graphene: Microscopic Rainbows (pages 3247–3251)

      J. Campos-Delgado, G. Algara-Siller, C. N. Santos, U. Kaiser and J.-P. Raskin

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300050

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      Blue, pink, and yellow colorations appear from twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) when transferred to a SiO2/Si substrate (SiO2 = 100 nm-thick). Raman and electron microscope studies reveal that these colorations appear for twist angles in the 9–15° range. Optical contrast simulations confirm that the observed colorations are related to the angle-dependent electronic properties of tBLG combined with the reflection that results from the layered structure tBLG/100 nm-thick SiO2/Si.

  10. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Fluorescence Quenching: Seeing Two-Dimensional Sheets on Arbitrary Substrates by Fluorescence Quenching Microscopy (Small 19/2013) (page 3252)

      Alvin T. L. Tan, Jaemyung Kim, Jing-Kai Huang, Lain-Jong Li and Jiaxing Huang

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370118

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      Fluorescence quenching microscopy (FQM), an optical technique originally developed for imaging graphenebased sheets on arbitrary substrates is extended by J. Huang and co-workers on page 3253 to other two-dimensional materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) sheets (background image). The panels in the main image are the MoS2 flakes imaged by reflectance mode optical microscopy (left), FQM (middle), and scanning electron microscopy (right).

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Seeing Two-Dimensional Sheets on Arbitrary Substrates by Fluorescence Quenching Microscopy (pages 3253–3258)

      Alvin T. L. Tan, Jaemyung Kim, Jing-Kai Huang, Lain-Jong Li and Jiaxing Huang

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300049

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      Fluorescence quenching microscopy (FQM) is demonstrated as a low-cost and high-throughput technique for seeing graphene-like 2D sheets such as MoS2. FQM provides high contrast and layer resolution comparable to those of scanning electron microscopy, but allows the imaging of samples deposited on arbitrary substrates, including non-conductive substrates such as quartz. Solution fluorescence quenching studies suggest that FQM should be feasible for many other 2D materials such as WS2, Bi2Te3, MoSe2, NbSe2, and TaS2.

    2. Tandem Assays of Protein and Glucose with Functionalized Core/Shell Particles Based on Magnetic Separation and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 3259–3264)

      Xianming Kong, Qian Yu, Zhongpeng Lv and Xuezhong Du

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201203248

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      Tandem assays of protein and glucose in combination with mannose-functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 and Ag@SiO2 tag particles have promising potential in effective magnetic separation and highly sensitive and selective SERS assays of biomaterials. It is for the first time that tandem assay of glucose is developed using SERS based on the Con A-sandwiched microstructures between the functionalized magnetic and tag particles.

  12. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Micropatterning: Interdigitated Multicolored Bioink Micropatterns by Multiplexed Polymer Pen Lithography (Small 19/2013) (page 3265)

      Falko Brinkmann, Michael Hirtz, Alexandra M. Greiner, Markus Weschenfelder, Björn Waterkotte, Martin Bastmeyer and Harald Fuchs

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370119

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      Multi-colored micropatterns are created by M. Hirtz, H. Fuchs, and co-workers on page 3266 using multiplexed polymer pen lithography (PPL). Separated macroscopic areas on a polymer pyramid stamp are coated with different inks. Taking advantage of the spatial control and capability of precise registry in PPL, truly multiplexed micropatterns with the different inks interdigitated within each repetitive subpattern are created over large areas. Due to the mild process parameters, this technique is especially of interest for biologicallyactive substances. Artwork in main image courtesy of G. Brinkmann.

  13. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correspondence
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    13. Frontispiece
    14. Full Papers
    1. Interdigitated Multicolored Bioink Micropatterns by Multiplexed Polymer Pen Lithography (pages 3266–3275)

      Falko Brinkmann, Michael Hirtz, Alexandra M. Greiner, Markus Weschenfelder, Björn Waterkotte, Martin Bastmeyer and Harald Fuchs

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201203183

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      Truly multiplexed micropatterns of bioactive inks are produced by polymer pen lithography (PPL). A new inking and writing strategy is presented that, taking advantage of the strength of microcontact printing (μCP) combined with the spatial control and capability of precise repetition and positioning of PPL, enables multicolored printing within each repetitive subpattern.

    2. Electric-Field-Induced Alignment of Block Copolymer/Nanoparticle Blends (pages 3276–3281)

      Clemens Liedel, Kerstin A. Schindler, Mariela J. Pavan, Christian Lewin, Christian W. Pester, Markus Ruppel, Volker S. Urban, Roy Shenhar and Alexander Böker

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202380

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      Similar to neat block copolymers, nanocomposites composed of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) and gold nanoparticles can be aligned in electric fields, which leads to a striped and aligned structure of nanoparticles after removal of the polymer. The onset of domain alignment in the presence of nanosized gold particles occurs at a substantially lower field than for corresponding films in the absence of particles, and decreases with increasing nanoparticle concentration.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nanoparticle Transport in Epithelial Cells: Pathway Switching Through Bioconjugation (pages 3282–3294)

      Robyn Fowler, Driton Vllasaliu, Francisco Fernández Trillo, Martin Garnett, Cameron Alexander, Helen Horsley, Bryan Smith, Ian Whitcombe, Mike Eaton and Snow Stolnik

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202623

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      The transport pathway of vitamin B12-conjugated nanoparticles in an intestinal cell model is shown to be different to both soluble B12 and unmodified nanoparticles. Following its conjugation to nanoparticles, B12 trafficking is switched to an alternative pathway, omitting the lysosomal stage. Unlike soluble B12, the uptake of vitamin B12-bearing nanoparticles occurs by a route perturbed by caveolae-specific inhibitors.

    4. Highly Flexible and Transparent Multilayer MoS2 Transistors with Graphene Electrodes (pages 3295–3300)

      Jongwon Yoon, Woojin Park, Ga-Yeong Bae, Yonghun Kim, Hun Soo Jang, Yujun Hyun, Sung Kwan Lim, Yung Ho Kahng, Woong-Ki Hong, Byoung Hun Lee and Heung Cho Ko

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300134

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      Versatility of using multilayer MoS2 and graphene to achieve highly flexible and tranparent transistors on a plastic substrate is demonstrated by optical/electrical analyses and stability tests upon mechanical bending.

    5. Triggering and Monitoring Plasmon-Enhanced Reactions by Optical Nanoantennas Coupled to Photocatalytic Beads (pages 3301–3307)

      Marco Salmistraro, Adam Schwartzberg, Wei Bao, Laura E. Depero, Alexander Weber-Bargioni, Stefano Cabrini and Ivano Alessandri

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300211

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      Au bowtie-like nanoantennas are fabricated on SiO2/TiO2 core/shell photocatalytic beads and exploited to concentrate light in order to promote degradation reactions. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering allows direct in-situ monitoring of the reaction progress of different analytes at the same site.

    6. Large Dynamic Range Digital Nanodot Gradients of Biomolecules Made by Low-Cost Nanocontact Printing for Cell Haptotaxis (pages 3308–3313)

      Sébastien G. Ricoult, Mateu Pla-Roca, Roozbeh Safavieh, G. Monserratt Lopez-Ayon, Peter Grütter, Timothy E. Kennedy and David Juncker

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202915

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      An easy, low cost, and massively parallel nanopatterning method based on lift-off nanocontact printing using disposable polymer masters is demonstrated. Its potential is shown by simultaneously patterning 64 digital nanodot gradients (DNGs) of proteins on a glass slide with a dynamic range of up to 4400 and comprising up to 419,790 200-nm-dots. Haptotaxis studies of C2C12 cells on DNGs of proteins and peptides validate DNGs for use in biological studies.

    7. Layer Thinning and Etching of Mechanically Exfoliated MoS2 Nanosheets by Thermal Annealing in Air (pages 3314–3319)

      Jumiati Wu, Hai Li, Zongyou Yin, Hong Li, Juqing Liu, Xiehong Cao, Qing Zhang and Hua Zhang

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201301542

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      A simple and low-cost MoS2 layer thinning method is developed. Double-layer (2L) to quadri-layer (4L) MoS2 nanosheets have been successfully thinned to single-layer (1L) MoS2 by thermal annealing in air, which show comparable properties with the pristine 1L MoS2 nanosheet. MoS2 mesh with high-density of triangular pits by thermal annealing in air is reported for the first time. The existence of MoO3 fragments on MoS2 nanosheet surface induces the hole injection, resulting in p-type MoS2 FET channel.

    8. Nanoscale Size Control of Protein Aggregates (pages 3320–3326)

      Christian Pedersen, Helen Vallhov, Håkan Engqvist, Annika Scheynius and Maria Strømme

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300149

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      Soluble protein aggregates with adjustable sub-micrometer sizes can be synthesized by mixing native and denatured proteins without using bacteria and contaminating proteins. Ovalbumin (OVA) aggregates of ∼95 nm, produced with the presented method, are more immunogenic compared to native OVA in a murine splenocyte proliferation assay. The method of engineering size-specific aggregates may constitute a route to increase the efficacy of protein vaccines.

    9. NIR-Emitting Quantum Dot-Encoded Microbeads through Membrane Emulsification for Multiplexed Immunoassays (pages 3327–3335)

      Xiebing Wang, Gang Wang, Wanwan Li, Bingxia Zhao, Bin Xing, Yuankui Leng, Hongjing Dou, Kang Sun, Lisong Shen, Xiangliang Yuan, Jiyu Li, Kun Sun, Junsong Han, Huasheng Xiao, Yue Li, Peng Huang and Xiaoyuan Chen

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201203156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A platform based on highly-fluorescent CdSeTe/CdS/ZnS NIR-emitting QD-encoded microbeads prepared by an SPG membrane emulsification technique are successfully combined with flow cytometry and a single 488 nm laser for multiplexed assays of biological samples.

    10. Cross-Linked g-C3N4/rGO Nanocomposites with Tunable Band Structure and Enhanced Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity (pages 3336–3344)

      Yibing Li, Haimin Zhang, Porun Liu, Dan Wang, Ying Li and Huijun Zhao

      Article first published online: 30 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201203135

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      Tunable optical properties of g-C3N4/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposite improve the visible light utilization, oxidation power, and electron transport property, resulting in a dramatically enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity at the appropriate rGO ratio.

    11. Direct Measurements of the Mechanical Strength of Carbon Nanotube–Poly(methyl methacrylate) Interfaces (pages 3345–3351)

      Xiaoming Chen, Meng Zheng, Cheol Park and Changhong Ke

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202771

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      The interfacial strength between individual double-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(methyl methacrylate) is characterized using an in situ nanomechanical single-tube pull-out testing scheme inside a high-resolution electron microscope. These measurements reveal the shear lag effect on the nanotube–polymer interface and demonstrate that the effective interfacial load transfer occurs only within a certain embedded length.

    12. Electrical Graphene Aptasensor for Ultra-Sensitive Detection of Anthrax Toxin with Amplified Signal Transduction (pages 3352–3360)

      Duck-Jin Kim, Hae-Chul Park, Il Yung Sohn, Jin-Heak Jung, Ok Ja Yoon, Joon-Shik Park, Moon-Young Yoon and Nae-Eung Lee

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201203245

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      A chemically derived graphene field-effect transistor (FET) with aptamer recognition molecules shows ultra-sensitivity (12 aM∼120 fM) for anthrax toxin due to the higher affinity of the aptamer probe compared to that of an Ab probe. Detection capability with a limit of detection (LOD) at the attomolar level (1.2 aM) is achieved due to the amplification of signal transduction by the additional use of the secondary aptamer-conjugated gold nanoparticles (aptamer-AuNPs).

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